1st time builder with progress pics and questions

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by Phrancis, Dec 23, 2009.

  1. Phrancis

    Phrancis Paddler

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    @ Tootsall - yeah, I'm gonna drop by "Next Adventure", my favorite local shop, and see what they have. I've been on a low budget for this whole project and might even pick up the same $30 nylon/neoprene Delta touring skirt that I have now - except the next bigger size of course.

    @ KathyD - Previously in my post I did want to add graphite powder (white) for the entire hull, but I had a hard time finding it locally, it was expensive, and as Dave pointed out, it doesn't actually offer UV protection. This is my first experience with marine paint and a non plastic boat in general, so I'll evaluate how things go and might attempt the graphite thing in the fall. I still have lots of epoxy left!

    @ Astoriadave -Yeah, I was pretty nervous about prematurely putting holes in her. I really thought long and hard about the padeye layout before drilling. I suppose I could have paddled it for awhile first and then saturated the insides of the holes I drilled later with varnish... I have done a good amount of paddling and camping with rented canoes and the 5 previous plastic rec and touring boats that I've owned and I've come to the conclusion that I don't like much stuff on the deck and I've never had to use a paddle float for re-entry. I also like having a map in front of me but find the diagonal bungees over it very distracting. If I liked strapping small bags and boxes I'd probably go for the "X" pattern for security. With the under deck bag and the storage volume available, I really don't expect to put much on deck. There are two left over padeyes and a bunch of shock cord left, so I could add more lines. I just hope I don't have to fill holes.

    Yeah, I'm with you, I don't expect to do any rock gardening / rough water paddling with this boat (the Chatham was designed for that), so I'm considering not doing the perimeter lines also. Well they'd probably be attached to existing hardware, so it might not be so bad just for safety's sake. I'll think about that some more...
     
  2. Phrancis

    Phrancis Paddler

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    Well I think she's done. I modified the hand toggles with bungee to be flush with the deck aiming forward and I really think the paint and varnish is as hard and cured as it's gonna get. Before the bulkheads, hatches, paint/varnish and all the deck hardware she weighed 40lbs and 45 exactly with everything. I only had a cheap bath scale, but the Chatham came out to 64lbs and that's about what Necky says it is. Hmm, I didn't put many saturation coats, none on the inside, and didn't even fiberglass the bulkhead walls. I wonder what I did to add weight above Pygmy's specs or how they claim it'll only take 70 hours of work...

    Right, Well today was the maiden voyage / shake down cruise. She went on the car just like all my other kayaks and 3 straps around the roof held her down well. I almost didn't have enough line since it's wider and much higher in volume, but I didn't even have to use the new "under hood" modified lines today - no highways speeds. Sure enough, when I got to the Sellwood park parking lot I got a couple of compliments.
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    I've never been able to carry my kayak very far or to the water without help or the portage cart, but not this time. We've had a lot of rain and the Willamette was running high. Unfortunately the waterline was well past the sandy beach and up to the rough rocky area. I made sure to float her out before getting in, but still ended up scraping some of the paint off the keel. Ehh, The first of many battle scars.
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    It was calm with a light quartering wind, but a small lean kept her straight. Those hard chines were very effective and after demoing an Ikkuma and Delta yak, that's why I choose the Arctic Tern. Well that, weight, and price. I will however have to add some hip pads and beefier thigh braces to get that locked in feel, since leaning this thing is more of an effort. I'll also need to make sure my nuts and bolts are tighter since my back rest came off out there. I went another quarter mile to the northern tip of Ross Island where it was sandy, to make repairs and take some pics while she still looks pristine.
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    It was a very calm day, but some power boat wake did send 2 foot wave over the deck. Hatches didn't leak and she felt rock solid - like a rec boat or canoe that you could fall asleep in. I did walk her out to the deep end turned her over a few times and submerged the hatches in different directions. Despite being cinched tighter, the rear hatch took on a few cups of water and the front a few ounces. I taped off those small holes in the bulkheads before testing and the foam hatch seal looks tight. I dunno, but I'll need to figure out the entry point before camping season or pool rolling sessions. I will say that operating the buckle sys isn't hindered while wearing glacier gloves, but it's just as slow and annoying.
    Yeah, those fastex buckles are sounding better and better.
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    Besides that, and some cockpit padding, I think my only other personalization will be a 2 stickers on either side of the stern. One is a shout out to my home waters back east and the other representing my new home.
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    Initial performance thoughts - well she's feels about as fast as the Chatham, but slower than my previous Shadow Sea lion. According to hydrodynamic specs she's supposed to be a tad slower than the Chatham at cruising speed. I suppose less rocker, more waterline, a sharp bow n stern, and the super smooth hull helped negate the extra 2 inches in beam because I didn't really notice. I didn't have a gps to quantify that and the specs were probably talking about a smooth FG Chatham's hull and not my fuzzy plastic one. I can say for sure that there's much less bow wake compared to the Chatham. She's also more comfy with the big back rest and thigh supports.

    Again, she carves a nice turn when leaned and so far I don't think I'll need a skeg. I am anxious to get her into some wind waves and bad chop to really see how well she resists weather cocking. I use a longish greenland paddle with a more vertical stroke and despite the extra beam and not being swede form, I didn't hit the deck at all. Again, she's got rock solid stability - I can easily dip the coaming into the water with light sculling and any camping gear would just make her settle down with the CG even lower.

    I usually see other kayakers in the area but not today. The only two I came across were these two girls that I ran into at the store yesterday, who where also shopping for a spray skirt. And amazingly, one was paddling a Pygmy Queen Charlotte and the other was sporting an Arctic Tern 14! Compliments were of course exchanged and I went on to enjoy a nice first paddle.
     
  3. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Congratulations! Looking very sweet. That boat will get a lot of attention. Should be a great tripping boat for you.
     
  4. RoyN

    RoyN Paddler

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    Nice looking boat.

    After reading an article in the current Sea Kayaker magazine, I'm going to make it a habbit to ALWAYS use a bow tie-down when transporting my kayaks. Sea Kayaker has an article about a person who didn't tie down the bow and had the kayak and rack blow off of their car. After further investigation I found the owner purchased the boat two weeks earlier and now had it in the shop to repair the broken bow. I saw the kayak and car the day this accident happened after the kayak and rack had been put back on top of the car and tied-down with a bow line. It's remarkable how much air pressure there is on the bottom of your kayak caused by the air rushing up over your windshield.
     
  5. Tootsall

    Tootsall Paddler

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    I'll add another, Roy. Make sure your boat straps also trap and hold down the cockpit "travel cover". I've had the bow blast from a semi implode and blow my cockpit cover off and only because I'd snapped the safety line onto a deck bungee did I fail to lose it completely. Now I also "trap" the back end of the cockpit cover as well: too much gear rides in the cockpit when going down the road to take a chance on losing... say... a spray skirt or paddle float or.......
     
  6. KathyD

    KathyD Paddler

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    Looks great. I like the black paint on the bottom and the white shear tape. Does it feel great to be done? I'm looking forward to that in a week or so if all goes as planned!

    Kathy
     
  7. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    Lookin' great Phrancis! You need to have someone take a picture of you, in and on the water! :D
     
  8. Phrancis

    Phrancis Paddler

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    @ RoyN and Tootsall, yeah she's buffeted by highway winds more since she's wider and lighter than past boats. I'm in the process of replacing the buckle on the car hood straps with something beefier. I wouldn't want it to fail and the strap wrapped around the front wheel n rip the bow off... I don't store gear in her while car topping, also I don't use the cockpit cover unless it rains and the pull tab is always clipped to the deck bungee.

    @ Kathy, yes! I'm very glad to finish her. With the garage use deadline and more contract work on the plate, this build was no longer a relaxing zen thing - especially the sanding part. Good luck with yours as well. Looks like you're at the "fun" part. I'd recommend a good power sander...

    Well I've added a bunch of silicone sealant around the porous hatch gaskets and on the inside surface of the covers to "fill in" the cloth texture and hopefully create a better seal. I hope that's the leaky hatch solution.


    Thank you all! (especially Astoriadave) for the comments, suggestions, and wisdom of past boat builds. The Tern was a fun project for my situation, where I had a lot of time and not a lot of $ and wanted a light high performance touring yak. Fully outfitted, she weighed a tad more than expected and took much longer to build than anticipated, but I'm sure with perfect conditions, tools, and experience the advertised 70 hours is doable. I'd have to say a heated garage, a good power sander, and quality cabinet scraper early on would have saved me a lot of time and effort. I'll know that for when I decide to build that Shearwater or one of those Yostwerks SOF's - besides, I've still got a bunch of fg cloth and about 40% of the epoxy unused. For now, a backyard water feature and fireplace mantle is next on my honey do list!

    I took tons of pics along the way with a few ending up on Picassa and a fraction of those on this forum, so here's a bunch more.
    <embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://picasaweb.google.com/s/c/bin/slideshow.swf" width="1000" height="650" flashvars="host=picasaweb.google.com&hl=en_US&feat=flashalbum&RGB=0x000000&feed=http%3A%2F%2Fpicasaweb.google.com%2Fdata%2Ffeed%2Fapi%2Fuser%2Fphrancis5%2Falbumid%2F5413107078546932993%3Falt%3Drss%26kind%3Dphoto%26hl%3Den_US" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer"></embed>
     
  9. morla2nd

    morla2nd New Member

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    Great job! Following your progress has really helped me, thanks for posting.
     
  10. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Great slide show, Phrancis. Enjoy the boat!
     
  11. Kheyashunka

    Kheyashunka Paddler

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  12. RoyN

    RoyN Paddler

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    Nice slide show.

    I noticed in the picture you were showing a cut-off wheel that appears to have exploded. When I use the type of cut-off wheel you were using with my Dremel tool, I coat the wheel with superglue before I use it. The superglue seems to make the wheel wear slower and seems less suseptable to exploding with a little side load. Make the superglue is completely cured before you install the wheel.
     
  13. Phrancis

    Phrancis Paddler

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    @ RoyN - super glue ehh? I hope the vaporized or fine dust from super glue treated cut off wheels isn't too toxic. Yeah, I bought the bigger fiber reinforced cut off wheels afterward, but I'll keep superglue in mind.


    Well after a second paddle I felt comfortable with the foam padding placement and put down some some silicone adhesive (ran out of aquaseal). I carved some small hip pads to help with edging.
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    I carved some thicker thigh pads that extend from the coaming to the deck chine. A small extension sticks out into the cockpit opening, which also serves as a comfort pad when shouldering the boat. She's not so light that I didn't get bruises on my shoulder when portaging from the parking lot.
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    As I mentioned, silicone was slathered over the foam hatch seals and the inside edge of the hatches to fill in the fg weave and any air squeezing through the porous foam. On my second leak test I thought I had actually glued my covers to the openings because I couldn't open them. Turns out that they were vacuum sealed since I still had temporary tape over the bulkhead pressure relief valves. Now I know my camping gear will be bone dry.
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    One of those little suction cup car compasses was wired to a hatch strap far enough away from the metal buckle. Not for serious navigation, but great for basic directions - small, low profile, and cheap. It's possibly against the spirit of the greenland paddle, but I have a bad habit of going out without a spare paddle and so I made a bungee leash that slides along the shaft for sliding strokes. With enough pull the bungee loop will slide right over the blade, so I won't be using it like a harpoon. It's however lighter and quieter than my coiled leash which bangs on the deck...
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  14. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    Very nice! I bet you are glad you are all finished!
    Ready to start the next one? :D
     
  15. mik976

    mik976 New Member

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    new kayak on the water!

    Great looking boat Phrancis, I haven't kept up on your progress till now and it looks very nice. Might see you on the water now that the weather is warming up.
     
  16. Phrancis

    Phrancis Paddler

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  17. Whidbey

    Whidbey Paddler

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  18. Whidbey

    Whidbey Paddler

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    I placed a fake order for the canoe kit above and got this response from CLC:

    From: John C. Harris [mailto:john@clcboats.com]
    Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:57 AM
    To: (me)
    Subject: Thanks for your order!

    We decided that the first person to order a Einbaum Canoe would
    receive a free CLC T-shirt. What's your address and size?

    Cheers,

    --
    John C. Harris
    Chesapeake Light Craft
    "The Best Boats You Can Build"
    http://www.clcboats.com
     
  19. Phrancis

    Phrancis Paddler

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    Nice! You should tell em your address is a neolithic cave.
     
  20. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    I think the shipping is pretty reasonable.