Adding a day hatch

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by bertrum23, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. bertrum23

    bertrum23 New Member

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    I have a QCC700xl and would like to add a 8" day hatch (behind the cockpit, right of center). Because the back deck is slightly rounded, the day hatch plate will not sit flat. I was thinking of adding an additional gasket that would be slightly thicker on the sides and thinner in the middle. Has anyone out there had this issue and a good fix?

    Bert
     
  2. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    No matter the cross sectional shape chosen, the hatch-base cross section should most easily be made to match the hatch-lid cross section. And then in either case [flat or shaped] the gasket would be of a continuous thickness.
    So I don't know what you're thinking, but it really doesn't make much sense to put a flat lid on top of a rounded [or whatever] cross sectional deck shape . . . but if you're set on a flat lid, make a flat gasket base and use a uniform gasket.
    But horses for courses, if you wish a flat lid on a curved base, get out the silicone/urethane gasket goo and mush it on the curved base and jam on a mold released flat lid and let it set up: then you have a curved base and a flat lid - or the reverse if you wish.

    Whatever you do, it makes sense to make a careful cut and keep the cutout in case you do wish as aesthetic match down the line - ie it is always nice to have options.
     
  3. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Bert:
    Are you planning to use a commercial hatch (rim and lid) assembly like the SeaLect or the KajakSport?
    (ABS rim and rubber-y snap-on lid).
    You are correct that you need an absolutely flat surface for the rim attachment. Even a very small 'warp' of the rim will result in sealing problems and leaks between the rim and the cover.
    How much epoxy work have you done? One option would be to 'build up' the surface with thickened epoxy to create the flat surface (in the same way that Mick has described for silicone or sealant). If you tint the epoxy black and do a careful job of masking the result would be fairly 'professional' - looking. It would be a tricky job. Another possibility would be to shape a wood (plywood?) ring to match the deck curvature on the underside and then bond it in place and cover it with (tinted) epoxy.
    I would be concerned about the height of your hatch cover above the deck as it could get in the way - that's one reason why hatch covers are often recessed. This may not be an issue for you.
    Have you paddled a boat with a day hatch and find your QCC inconvenient by comparison?
     
  4. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    John's suggestion of building out a flat resting surface for the hatch would be my choice, also. To do this right, you need some epoxy and glass experience, because building up off a curved deck surface will be a bit tricky. If you go this route, you might build a mockup first, off a piece of glass/epoxy molded to the area you intend to place the hatch. Use mold release or similar so the mockup does not become a permanent fixture!

    You might research YouTube. Likely somebody has a video detailing a similar placement.

    If you go this route, please post back with pictures!
     
  5. drahcir

    drahcir Paddler

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    Should this discussion be moved to the "Boat and Accessory Building" topic area?

    And yes, OP, please send photos of what you end up as your solution.
     
  6. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    That's an excellent idea - build your (rigid) gasket on the deck, pop it off and then you can smooth it up (and fit it to the rim) on the workbench before bonding it to the deck permanently.
    "Contac'-type stick on shelf paper is an excellent 'mold release' barrier for a smooth surface like a deck section. That's what I use when I start to build a hatch recess on an existing boat. I make sure to run the plastic over a larger area so that any epoxy drips don't become a 'permanent feature' of the boat!
     
  7. semdoug

    semdoug Paddler

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    Will you also be adding a third bulkhead?

    Seems like building up the deck and adding the gasket, coaming and lid is going to result in the day hatch standing well proud of an otherwise clean deck.

    Is this a Kevlar construction? If so, things can get a little tricky.
     
  8. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Excellent point!
    Usually I need to cut out the aft cockpit bulkhead in order to fit the bulkhead aft of the day hatch.

    Adding a day hatch is a much bigger job than one might think.
     
  9. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    I don't think a raised day hatch would give acceptable ergonomics - especially as you have the choice to make it flush or recessed. For my money, the simplest approach would be of a recessed lip, neoprene hatch cover and the glass cutout lid reinforced and strapped down flush to the deck over the top similar to many other ordinary hatches on some glass boats.
    A bulkhead is a problem that most simply is accessed by what John just recommended, but another alternative is to make a small sea sock day hatch volume that makes the hatch volume sealed and separated from the rear hatch but allows all sorts of adjusting to baggage shapes from the rear hatch area. Another option anyway.
     
  10. Roy222

    Roy222 Paddler

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    Is this what you want?
    http://www.clcboats.com/shop/products/b ... lates.html

    Your deck surface might be flat enough.
    If not, you might:
    Purchase a day hatch kit.
    Hole saw a hole in the deck that is larger then the large hatch ring. Then use that same hole saw in a flat material ( like 1/4" plywood) to make a flat plug. Glue the plug into the deck opening with thickened epoxy and fiberglass reinforce from the underside of the deck. Finish the outside surface with fiberglass and gelcoat or paint. Then follow the instruction included with the hatch kit you purchase : install the hatch.
    Just make sure you are happy with the repaired surface before you cut the hole for the hatch.

    I suggested using a hole saw to illustrate the concept of a ring in a ring. Any fabrication method/tool will work.
    But if you use a hole saw to both cut the hole and make the plug, gap between the deck and the plug will be very close to constant.
    If you can't find a hole saw that same (CLC) site sells a small pull saw intended for cutting out hatches.

    Roy