Another Arctic Tern 14 build.

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by Papacliff, Jul 16, 2007.

  1. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Cliff, that tear-out is very unusual. I suspect tape with a more controlled release might do the job. Be very careful sanding those out. You might be better off filling them with resin (unfilled) if you plan to finish the boat bright. If you plan to paint, then fill with wood-flour-enhanced resin (thin mix) after the saturation coat of resin, sand to a fair surface, then glass.
     
  2. Papacliff

    Papacliff Paddler

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    Long Island NY, USA
    Dave,

    Yes I'm varnishing, so I will be careful. I think it was caused by humidity. The grain lifting in damp weather and getting pulled off by the tape. It looks deeper than it is, but the odd thing is that some of it was caused by blue painter's masking tape. Fairly low tack, good controlled release.

    The weather has dried out a bit, I'm hoping that there will be minimal additional "tearing". I will lightly sand, and see what happens with a saturation coat. If I still have issues before I glass, I'll try to figure a way to fill it.

    Cliff
     
  3. Papacliff

    Papacliff Paddler

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    Ok gentlemen (and ladies--I know you're out there, sushiy), here is today's question.

    Actually, I have two questions.

    The first: When taping the inside of the deck, I ran into a problem. When replacing the deck on the hull to cure, apparently the tape at the bow end pulled slightly off the deck. I've got some air bubbles and gaps for about three inches at the end. I figure that I've got to remove and replace the tape there, what is the best way? If you think I don't need to replace, that's okay, I'll accept that answer. Unfortunately I don't have pictures of it. If I have to, I can post a pic later tonight or tomorrow.

    The second: I'm thinking of putting handles on the deck instead of the toggles through the hull. This eliminates the end pour, and the drilling of a big hole in the hull. Also, I just like the look better than having the toggles hanging off the ends. If I attach the handles to the deck, is it strong enough to lift the boat, or do I risk breaking something? I could put a couple of braces across the hull at or just below the sheer, and attaching the handle to that through the deck. Any thoughts on this?

    As always, thanks in advance.

    Cliff
     
  4. Batstar

    Batstar Paddler

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    I can’t help you with the bow toggle as I followed the standard Pygmy method (end pour) for my AT17. When it came to attaching the stern toggle, I used a waterproof u-bolt. The u-bolt came with a steel plate for additional bracing under the deck. Naturally, I always hoist a loaded boat by holding the bottom of the hull as main support and sometimes use the rear toggle to stabilize my hold while carrying the boat. I also the u-bolt as a pass through for a cable lock.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Papacliff

    Papacliff Paddler

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    Ok, I've definitely decided to use top mounted handles instead of hanging toggles. I know the kayak should be lifted from the bottom, not the handles, but I don't want to take any chances that something might break.

    I had thought of putting a reinforcing plate across the hull just below the sheer, and bolting the handle through that. It would take the load off the deck, and transfer it to the hull, but I think that may cause another problem.

    The deck is attached for the entire length of the sheer. The plate (made of the same plywood used for the forms during the build) would only attach for its own length, which would be about 12". Should I be concerned about concentrating the load, ripping out the plate and causing more damage?

    I could reinforce the deck by putting in plates along the centerline like the ones in front of the cockpit. That would strengthen the deck, but (a) not transfer the load to the hull (a bad thing) and (b) still carry the load along the length of the sheer (a good thing).

    I don't normally carry heavy loads in the kayak. Thus far, my kayaking consists of short day trips. No overnight or long trips requiring equipment and provisions.

    Any recommendations, guys?

    Cliff
     
  6. Papacliff

    Papacliff Paddler

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    Long Island NY, USA
    It Floats!

    Put the boat in the water yesterday.

    [​IMG]

    It's not quite done, I still need to do hatches and bulkheads, and decklines, but I couldn't wait to try it.

    Put in at a flat river, and paddled for about an hour. Except for needing to adjust the backband, it is comfortable, and handles wonderfully.

    I'm really happy with the way it turned out, now I get to spend the winter doing finish work.

    Thanks to all for the advice and help.