Cedarglass canoe - repair, keep, sell?

Discussion in 'General Paddling Discussions' started by Blue Sky Presents, May 16, 2017.

  1. Blue Sky Presents

    Blue Sky Presents New Member

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    I have a gorgeous, feather-light Coaticook cedar strip/glass canoe by Great Canadian Canoe (RIP) that is languishing more or less unused in storage, and am looking for some input from canoeists before I decide what to do with it. It seems absolutely criminal that this canoe isn't in a lake at least 6 months of the year, if not hanging in someone's living room like a piece of art.

    Between shipping it across the country and taking the thing in and out of the water in rocky areas the hull has suffered some unsightly scratches, though none above the waterline and none seem to have gone through the fiberglass. If I am going to sell it, the beauty of the boat being a big part of its appeal, how can I determine if the repair of these scratches is worth undertaking?

    If the repair is too pricy, and the damage brings the resale value down sufficiently I would likely keep it, in which case I'd love to connect with some Lower Mainland paddlers who have some patience with a novice and may want to share use of the boat either in exchange for storage, lessons, good company, what have you. Thought this part of the forum might be a good place to start although I know I'm touching on a few different topics here.
     
  2. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    If the damage hasn't even gone thru the glass, the boat is easily fixable. If you don't want to do it yourself, take it [or phone up] to Rod Tait of Orcaboats [http://www.orcaboats.ca/] who will give you a reasonable estimate of repair cost as well as steps to take to fix it your self.
    Show us some pics of the damaged areas and there are a bunch here who can give good guidance.
    Sheesh, I've paddled whitewater beside decent strip canoes. They get bashed up a bit, but even wood damage is just wood and can be repaired - but just the skin? heck, you're laughing.
     
  3. Pawistik

    Pawistik Paddler

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    Saskatoon, SK
    I agree with Mick, yours doesn't sound too bad off.

    Cedarstrip canoes & kayaks are much tougher than they look, or at least they can be. It depends on the build, of course. As long as the wood isn't wet, it's not a big problem. If the wood got wet and stayed wet, then there are bigger issues. But scratches are fine, and even deep scratches can be repaired.

    The problem with selling them is that people look at them and see fragile, and most don't want fragile. Plus, usually only the builder really appreciates the blood, sweat and tears that went into the build, so it's hard to recoup their value when sold. Finally, build quality varies greatly - from works of art to workhorses to poorly-built beasts. Buyers might shy away from the unknown quality of a strip-built boat. Those with the knowledge of what it's worth and know how to assess the quality are usually also builders, who would just as soon build their own (or harbor dreams of building more, even if they don't). But, with some patience you may very well find the perfect buyer for the perfect canoe.

    So fix it or get it fixed (I agree, Rod Tait would be a good place to start), but get it back on the water whether that's with you aboard or someone else.

    Cheers,
    Bryan
     
  4. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Someone built it from raw materials. Someone can fix it. And a couple scars from battles with barnacles and boulders should be worn proudly.
     
  5. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    to Blue Sky,
    [did you notice that] Rod Tait of Orca boats is offering a perfect opportunity for you to find out the next logical steps.