Charts on your iPhone

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by DarrenM, Nov 11, 2009.

  1. DarrenM

    DarrenM Paddler

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    Im assuming the phone is tower and the gps is satellite.

    Although the iphone has a stock gps and digital compass. Its just like another gadget you have.. Obviously dont rely on it as your main piece of equipment.. That kinda goes without saying.... Im not suggesting we need to get rid of our paper charts, compass and VHF.

    Im HOPING to bundle my cell, GPS, iPod etc into one gadget.
     
  2. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    The charts are available from Navionics for anywhere on the planet ranging from $10 up to $50 per region (most regions are around $10). There are also maps available for inland lakes.

    I need to upgrade my iTouch.

    And, I can use my Solio charger to refill my (soon to be) new iPhone when the batteries wear down. :big_thumb

    *****
     
  3. DarrenM

    DarrenM Paddler

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    <------Adds this to wish list :lol:
     
  4. Rootman

    Rootman Paddler

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    I have TideApp for the iPhone. Free and it works great. Does nice tide charts.
     
  5. Mark_Schilling

    Mark_Schilling Paddler

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    The GPS operates independently of network coverage. In short the answer is no, the GPS location is not via triangulation from cell towers - it's an actual GPS. So even if you have no network coverage, the GPS is still active. Also gives much better accuracy this way. There were some issues with Google Maps and Telus Blackberries before the current BB operating system, whereby Google Maps used cell tower triangulation by defaut. My usual accuracy was between 1000 and 3200 metres so it had me literally miles away from my actual location at times. Now it gets 3m accuracy as routine, even sitting in my office or (like now) on the ferry.

    There are some great possibilities with having an internet-enabled device mixed into the same device as a GPS and camera. ie I can show any of my Google contacts where I am by turning on an option in Google Maps with my GPS enabled. Plus enabling location-specific information incorporated into a photo taken with the device, and the usual stuff you see on the ads (for example, find a restaurant near your current location, and access their website or call them for reservations etc. with the click of a button).
     
  6. DarrenM

    DarrenM Paddler

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    OK. this app ROCKS! still playing with it, but so far so good. And the GPS in the iPhone is WAY more accurate then my old blackberry (even inside my house)
     
  7. DarrenM

    DarrenM Paddler

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    side note, downloaded topo maps Canada/US.
    $6.99 its just scanned topo's (not vector) nice to have on my phone but not worth the price.... so mho don't bother...


    Now pocket guitar.... thats some cool shit :)
     
  8. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    I just bought it!

    Maps are very detailed.:D
    You can click on a Navaid to find out what it is. I am trying to figure out what all the wavy red lines are for? When I touch on them it says it is the "Tidal stream(ebb and flood)", so must meant that is the way the tides flow?



    I have used Google maps(on the iphone) to to drive around Victoria and it worked great! I didn't know if it was using the cell towers or GPS to place me on the map, but it was accurate!
     
  9. The GCW

    The GCW Paddler

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    POWER

    Wonder what 8 day paddlers do to keep it juiced.

    Is there a solar type gizmo for an iphone -to keep it charged? Can an iphone spare battery be had?

    Also, is it mind bending to learn to use an iphone to begin with?
     
  10. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Re: POWER

    http://www.solio.com

    It's remarkably intuitive. Probably one of the easiest devices to learn -- it's extremely well designed (and most likely the main reason that they are so popular).

    *****
     
  11. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    It is easier to use then my old BB.
    Screen is better, connection to Internet is faster. Web pages are easy to read just by pulling your fingers apart on the screen. Itunes with ipod. Text messaging is simple easy. You can do voice memos or voice dialling. Unlimited number of apps for whatever you need to do. I don't have games on my but quite a few utilities I used daily.
     
  12. DarrenM

    DarrenM Paddler

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  13. DarrenM

    DarrenM Paddler

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    No one will ever want to come camping with me ever again! :lol:

    I want one of these.
    http://www.3m.com/mpro/

    to watch the this is the sea movies of course....
     
  14. jipstyle

    jipstyle New Member

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    Sadly, this is not true.

    I have owned an iPhone 3G for the past year and some months .. since Sept 08. I recently drove across Canada from Halifax to Vancouver using my phone as my map and GPS and was sorely disappointed with the performance of the phone as a GPS unit. In fact, I've since purchase a stand-alone GPS for my jeep.

    The phone works fine so long as you are within 3G coverage and you have lots of cell towers around you. Once you step outside of that ... into EDGE territory, for instance ... you run into two problems.

    The first problem is that the phone's GPS is very limited. It has a horrible time 'pinning down' your location. Often, I found that I was driving in the middle of the St. Lawrence, according to my phone, or several hundred meters into a farmer's field rather than down the Transcanada. This happens whenever the phone can't use A-GPS and has to rely on its GPS only.

    This is backwards, actually. With the iPhone, anyway. When I'm in the city, the phone can generally pin me to within a meter or two because it can use several cell towers to accurately triangulate my position. When I'm outside of cell reception, I'm lucky to get within a km.

    Another thing to note is that google maps is useless without data reception. Not just cell, mind you ... you need a 3G connection for this app to work. It doesn't store any data on your phone .. rather, it downloads the images displayed on your screen ... whether map or sat .. on the fly. So if you don't have a data connection, you've got a nice red dot on a completely blank screen.

    In the city, absolutely. Outside of a metropolitan area, I wouldn't rely on the iPhone to do anything other than play some tunes for the day.

    This brings up another crucial point: I recharge my phone every night. EVERY night. If I forget to charge my iPhone at night, I find that it will run out of juice by about 8pm the following day. This depends entirely on usage, of course, but getting 48 hours out of it in idle mode is about the maximum you can expect. If you bring your iPhone with you on a long trip, you'll have to power it down when you aren't using it.

    Since it takes about 2 minutes for the iPhone to boot up, you certainly can't use it as a camera. "Hold that pose, Mr. Seal, I'll be RIGHT with you!" It just won't work. Furthermore, booting up the phone is a fairly power intensive task .. if you do it 5 or 6 times in a day, you've pretty much nullified the advantage of powering it down.

    Don't get me wrong .. I love my iPhone and I'd be lost (literally, in some cases) without it. I do dev work for it, have sold a couple of apps (though not enough to cover the cost of the OS I bought so I could code for my phone), and have it with me constantly .. when I'm in the city.

    When I leave the city, though .. I lock my phone in my jeep. If I am heading into the backcountry or out for a paddle, I don't bother bringing my iPhone. I drop the SIM into an older phone that I keep around for 'beating up and losing', for emergency contact, and leave my iPhone safely behind.
     
  15. DarrenM

    DarrenM Paddler

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    Interesting but absolutely irrelevant for me.

    I have more solar chargers then I know what to do with
    The chart app stores the "maps" on the phone
    90% of the places I paddle are within cell range.

    But thanks for posting :)
     
  16. jipstyle

    jipstyle New Member

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    Very nice! :)

    Other than paddling, 90% of my excursions involve all the weight going on my back .. whether hiking, climbing or skinning .. so solar chargers would also stay in my jeep.

    Having an app that stores the charts / maps on the phone is a nice idea .. much better than the standard google maps application. In fact, that is what a 'real' GPS does. I'd look into it if I hadn't already dropped the money on my in-car GPS.

    Best tool for the job changes according to the job, obviously .. I'm just posting my experience. :)
     
  17. DarrenM

    DarrenM Paddler

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    I have 3 hand held GPS's wanna buy one? :wink:

    FWIW there are some light weight solar panels out there...
     
  18. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    That in itself very well might be the cause of your short battery life. I've found that rechargeable devices should be completely, or nearly completely discharged of all power before recharging -- failing to do so results in a "memory loss" of the battery. My kids have iPhones (I have an iTouch) and they run their batteries down all the way before recharging and they're getting days of use out of them -- and I think it would be fair to say that they are using them a lot more than the average user. Once the battery memory is compromised, it can't be reinstated.

    *****
     
  19. jipstyle

    jipstyle New Member

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    Nope, that isn't the problem. I'm very familiar with the way modern batteries work .. also, my battery life has been consistent since I first purchased the phone.

    I imagine the difference is based on usage. My iPhone is a mini office and secretary. I probably get more emails and calendar alerts pushed to my phone in an hour than the average teenager gets txts .. and yes, I'm aware of how many texts teens like to exchange. ;)

    Having said that, I am definitely not an average user and should have noted that in my original post.
     
  20. Mike_Jackson

    Mike_Jackson Paddler

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    I was wondering about the topo maps... what do you think?