CLC Shearwater 14 build

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by KathyD, Dec 1, 2009.

  1. KathyD

    KathyD Paddler

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    I was afraid that you wouldn't be able to see the difference in the photos, but I could see it in person. Phrancis, if I was using non-water-based varnish I would go for disposable too since I hate using really hazardous chemicals to clean oil-based finishes. Since this is water-based, I figure I can use the more expensive brush and clean it easily.

    Just came back from coat 3 on the deck. I had the door open in the garage to help dissipate the fumes. About 62 degrees, and probably 40% relative humidity (is 30% outside the house based on my weather station reading, but I sprayed water in the garage). I could notice that the LPU dried much faster in the warmer, drier air compared to this morning when it was closer to 58 degrees, and I bet 50% humidity. I had to work fast to keep a wet edge (good thing I've been practicing!) Rdstarr, you were asking about what would be ideal humidity - I'd say definitely above 50%, closer to 60% would be even better. I thinned the LPU just a bit more and it helped, so this is another variable you can play with a bit if the humidity is lower. Good luck!
     
  2. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Good that you are paying attention to the humidity, Kathy. Forty per cent would be a very low humidity, I suspect. On thinning: avoid anything over 20%. I think once or twice I over-thinned my WR LPU and got some really shoddy films, with not much abrasion resistance. Better to add moisture to the air above the work.
     
  3. KathyD

    KathyD Paddler

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    Dave, how long do you wait until you sand the LPU (wet sand prior to final coat)? I don't want to mess it up by sanding too soon.
     
  4. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    A day is plenty. I gather you plan to wet-sand the entire boat? Go easy on it -- you only need to get a uniform glaze. I'd probaby hand-sand the whole thing, with special tenderness on the seams, probably a quick pass with 100 or 120 just to knock off the big stuff, then go to 220. It does not take very much sanding on an edge to cut into it a lot.

    I think Dan has gone to 400 and maybe 600 before that last coat. 220 is my limit.

    Have "fun" with it. :wink:
     
  5. KathyD

    KathyD Paddler

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    Thanks Dave. I was planning to wet sand at 320 or 400 prior to the final coat just on the deck to knock off the 2 runs I have. I'll put on coat 4 now, then let it dry overnight, and sand and do the final coat tomorrow since it seems to go a little better in the morning when it's cool and damper.
     
  6. KathyD

    KathyD Paddler

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    Here's the deck after 3 coats. I just put on a 4th, then will do a 5th tomorrow after wet sanding.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    I wet sand to 400 before the final coats -- and I agree with Dave, lightly (really lightly) hand sand using a sanding block -- and use special care on your seams.

    I can see a few brush marks in your second photos but they don't look too bad from what I can tell -- your boat is looking awesome Kathy.

    *****
     
  8. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    Thanks Kathy for letting me know what your RH was in your garage before you started.

    Thanks again Dave for your advice!

    This morning I did my onlay! I'll post it in my build. Tomorrow I am finally gluing the deck to the hull!
     
  9. KathyD

    KathyD Paddler

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    Here it is with 4 coats of LPU on the hull, 5 on the deck, curing for 2 weeks (!!!) until we can do the maiden voyage. I'm not sure I can wait that long, but that's what System 3 recommends. I figure I'll give it a week and then install the deck rigging and see how patient I am. The wood grain is really nice.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  10. Whidbey

    Whidbey Paddler

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    Wow, that looks very nice!
     
  11. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    I love the look of a satin finished wood deck. Gloss always distracts me from the wood patterns and grain figures, but I'm easily distracted, i suppose.

    You aren't going to take that thing outside and get it wet and dirty, are you, Kathy??? :wink: :lol:
     
  12. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    Kathy, if you are using the cross-linker in the LPU, 24 hrs would be fine for sanding before the final coat... no need to go beyond 320 grit.
    If you do decide to rub the final coat to give it a slightly higher sheen and even out the final finish, I'd recommend using scotchbrite gray pads- they technically dont cut the surface, but "peen" it down to a slightly higher gloss, From the photos, you may not even need to do that, though... it looks great from what I can see.
     
  13. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    I think your done Kathy!!! Very nice finish!
     
  14. Jurfie

    Jurfie Paddler

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    That grain pattern is gorgeous, and I like seeing the jig-saw pattern joints!

    Beautiful job, Kathy! Looking forward to seeing pics of the maiden voyage.

    :cool :big_thumb
     
  15. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Kathy, I talked with the chemists at System 3 and they told me that 3 or 4 days is enough before putting the boat in the water. They said the additional curing time would only make a difference if the painted surface (LPU is paint) were to remain permanently submerged in water.

    All of my LPU coated boats have been in the water within 4 days of applying the LPU and I've experienced no detrimental effects.

    That's one very nice looking boat you've got there. :big_thumb

    *****
     
  16. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    I agree with Dan about 72 hours for launch time. When I first started using the Target coating wb lpu, I contacted the owner, who's also kayaker, and he told me the same thing, that the 2 week curing time is primarily for boats that stay in the water, not day use kayaks, etc.
     
  17. Roy222

    Roy222 Paddler

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    Thanks

    Kathy, I really want to thank you for your LPU application method. I was really struggling trying to spray LPU. The small roller and foam brush really works well.
    Roy
     
  18. KathyD

    KathyD Paddler

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    I'm glad it worked out for you Roy. I got most of my tips from others on the forum, everyone is very helpful.

    Have been working on little details and deck rigging the past few days. I had been hoping to do the first launch this past week, but the weather hasn't been cooperating. I want my son to do the first ride and I know he'll have lots more fun it it's warm and sunny instead of cold, rainy, and windy. Too bad because it was his Spring Break from school. Maybe next week.

    I've decided to try the Moby hatch hold downs. I'll post photos of the process as soon as the epoxy is cured and I put the bungees on. The delay did allow me to search around for other details and I found an old post by Joe Greenley on knotless bungee loops that I'll try on my deck rigging as soon as I get some super glue. Here's the link in case anyone is interested (maybe someone else has tried this?) I'll let you know how it goes.

    http://www.kayakforum.com/cgi-bin/Build ... read/54933[/url]

    Also found some posts on making your own spray skirts which I might try - I've been hoping to get over to Seattle Fabrics and make a cockpit cover, but maybe I'll get some neoprene and try a spray skirt just for fun too.
     
  19. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Sounds like this winter (spring?) weather has kept you inside. I admire your pluck in attempting to make your own sprayskirts, etc. Sewing neoprene is a challenge. If you have a walking foot on the machine, it is much easier. You might check out Penny's web site on sewing outdoor gear. Several years ago she put in a crotch zipper on a farmer john for Becky, and vowed she was never going to sew neoprene again, but she may have back-slid!

    Penny (Specialty Outdoors): http://www.specialtyoutdoors.com/
     
  20. RoyN

    RoyN Paddler

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    I'm a little skeptical about the knotless bungies. Cyanoacrelate (CA) glues, aka superglue, does not do a good job sticking to already cured CA glue.