Cold feet options

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by pawsplus, Jan 2, 2018.

  1. pikabike

    pikabike Paddler

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    Paws, what kind of boots are you wearing? Have you tried a thin wool sock inside your drysuit socks (if any), inside Chota Mukluk boots? When I had a drysuit with ankle gaskets, just thin wool socks inside the Chotas was warm enough for CO cold water, which sometimes was literally just above freezing.

    That was when I paddled a plastic kayak. You do need to get something warmer before your glass boat arrives, because those are colder yet.

    When I later bought a new drysuit that had Goretex sockfeet, my Chotas no longer fit, so I just bought some 3mm booties one size up from summer fit. However, mukluks are warmer.

    Surfer shops sell really thick neoprene booties, 7mm thick.
     
  2. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    Those boots look really bulky. I think I'd be uncomfy in them. And I have a monster high instep. Also, the colors of the women's boots are terrible LOL!

    I'm going to experiment with foam I think. And maybe those neoprene footy things I posted.
     
  3. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    I have neoprene dive booties--fairly thick rubber sole. Not sure of the maker. I know they are not 7mm neo though. They are 2 sizes bigger than I would normally wear, to accommodate dry suit socks and regular socks. Both my dry pants and now my dry suit are big on me--only other option was a smaller suit that was meant for a shorter person and that would have cut me in the crotch (!!), so I have bigger clothes and that means bigger socks, and the fabric bunches up, so I need bigger booties!

    I wear a thin wool sock inside normally--put on 2 thin socks the other day, with the (useless) foot warmers. I'm just worried about those big, bulky boots. They don't look like they'd be very comfy, crammed inside a kayak . . .
     
  4. pikabike

    pikabike Paddler

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    Not sure which boots are the ones you consider big and bulky, but the Chota Mukluks fit nicely in most sea kayaks, and they are only 3mm neoprene but with a firm fleecy lining.

    It is possible that your boots have too MUCH room in the toe area. Like trying to stay warm in an average sleeping bag instead of a small-person version. Your body has to work harder to heat more space.
     
  5. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    I'm also trying really hard not to have to buy yet another thing LOL. :)
     
  6. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    I was really warm other than my feet. I had on:

    Fleece-lined leggings
    Fleece turtleneck top over tech shirt
    2 pairs thin wool socks
    Dry suit with dry suit socks
    Fleece balaclava
    Brimmed hat (mostly just in case it rained, which it never did)
    Magic gloves with neoprene waterproof mittens over them, and pogies over those
     
  7. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    No--they are pretty snug with the extra drysuit socks and wool socks in there. I have to work a bit to get my feet in with all that stuff. They are loose in the summertime.
     
  8. pikabike

    pikabike Paddler

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  9. pikabike

    pikabike Paddler

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    Re: Buying more things...good luck with that! If you can avoid buying more big items soon, you’ll do well. I mean things like more boats, more good paddles, more drysuits or full wetsuits, more electronic gizmos...oh, and VEHICLE RACK HARDWARE! I am shocked at what some of the rooftopping setups cost.
     
  10. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    Well, that's the problem. New boat was bad enough, but new boat meant I had to get a new vehicle. I have been hauling the 14 footer on the back of my ancient truck, but (1) that would be dangerous for boat and other drivers with the new boat and (2) truck is so old that I can't GO anywhere, and what's the point of having a new boat if I can't get anywhere. So I traded my tiny Toyota Yaris in on a lightly used Toyota Rav4, and now I have a car payment again. May sell the truck as well, but hanging onto it for now for farm work. And then I needed a kayak rack, and got a Hullavator. Big bucks, but I'm pretty sure I can't get the boat up on top otherwise, at least not w/out damaging either vehicle or boat. So I bit the bullet.

    End result is that I've spent a LOT OF MONEY lately and I'm trying to avoid spending much more for a while. :)
     
  11. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Paws- I didn't see that you had mentioned the air and water temperatures - was it a warm day?

    What you list above is a lot less than I would wear on a day when the air temperature was in the high 30s or 40s F.
    For me, part of keeping my extremities warm (and I get cold hands/feet easily) is to keep my core warm.
    You have listed a single lower layer and two layers on your top, under the drysuit.
    I know that people vary a lot in their insulation requirements, but you might experiment with more layers under your drysuit.
    I was paddling yesterday in Oak Bay. Air temperature was about 5C - say 40F. Wind was about 10 knots or less.
    Under my drysuit I was wearing my fleece Outdoor Research Saturn suit - a fleece Farmer John-style suit.
    In addition to that:
    Bottom:
    Heavy wool hiking socks
    Mid-weight polypro HH (Helly) long underwear
    Top:
    Thin liner short sleeve shirt
    HH 'Warm' long sleeve top
    Cashmere V-neck sweater (thrift store)
    So, two layers on bottoms + 3-ish layers on top.
    Hands:
    Thin stretch work gloves (mainly for grip and blister protection
    Neoprene Pogies (snapdragon)
    Feet:
    LvlSix boots
    Head:
    Outdoor Research brim hat with breathable outer fabric and fleece lining, and earflaps

    There's no evaporative cooling under a drysuit, so (especially on day paddles) I don't worry much if my layers get a bit moist (not wet) from sweat. I have dry clothes in the car.
     
  12. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Paws, John's garb getup is a bit more elaborate than mine, but needs vary a lot.

    You may benefit from more insulation ... whatever fits and feels good ... and whatever avoids sweating up too much. I usually get myself comfy or slightly cooler than I want, on launch, and expect paddling to warm me up. If that fails, I bail at the nearest beach and add stuff only on the upper body to help out because undoing and redoing my layers below the waist is a huge clustermess. Your cold extremities definitely are an issue. In the event of a capsize, you might lose function pretty quickly.

    Please keep us posted. You are an innovative problem solver, and fun to read, also!
     
  13. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    It was cold--in the upper 20s (F), with a stiff wind. I was PERFECTLY WARM except for my feet. I would have been too hot wearing all that stuff, once I got going paddling! My fleece linings are thick and warm and I think I am wearing plenty for any day I will choose to go out (not gonna paddle when it's 4F, so not an issue!). :)

    It really is just hands and feet I have to worry about. Hands I have covered. Feet I'm still working on. I do wish the chemical warmers worked. They have been working great for years when I paddled in the winter. That darn O2!
     
  14. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    What sort of chemical warmers are you using?
     
  15. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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  16. Tangler

    Tangler Paddler

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    I seem to recall seeing some battery operated warming socks mentioned on a fishing forum once...
     
  17. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Something new to learn every day! Thanks!
    You could try one pair of thin socks under the drysuit socks, then the foot warmer outside the drysuit, then thick socks over that, then your boots, I suppose. They can't need much oxygen if people use them inside winter boots or plastic ski boots.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018
  18. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    I do that if I'm solo paddling for a workout, or if my companions are sure to be paddling fairly 'steadily'. On a more relaxed day paddle, some folks are in slower boats, stop for drinks/snacks/look at wildlife, etc. etc. and I don't want to be the guy saying:
    "Let's get moving, I'm getting chilly here!".
    I don't want to seem to be charging out in front, driving the pace, when I'm really just trying to keep warm!
    Not that I can stay in front of many of my friends...... :)
     
  19. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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  20. pawsplus

    pawsplus Paddler

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    Footwarmer outside drysuit won't work b/c the footwarmers can't get wet. I can't help getting my feet in the water entering and exiting the boat.

    I did look at the electric sox. That seemed ill-advised, given all the water involved, but I guess if the dry suit really works . . . .! I'm going to try the insulation first. If necessary, I'll think about electric sox. :)