Dionisio Park on Galiano Island

Discussion in 'Trip Reports' started by kayakingkarebear, May 24, 2012.

  1. kayakingkarebear

    kayakingkarebear Paddler

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    If anyone is looking for a nice quiet place to paddle to I recently visited Dionisio park on Galiano (north point of the island facing Porlier Pass). I hiked in with family and we only saw one other couple. There is no vehicle access to the park for the public so the plentiful sites were all vacant on the long weekend. There even appeared to be a rack for kayaks! This park is now on my paddling bucket list! I'll post the pictures when the computer gods allow.
     
  2. Peppermint Patty

    Peppermint Patty New Member

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    Hi ,
    I'm kayaking with a group of 6 people to Wallace Island in mid June and we wanted to camp at Dionisio park for a night. We haven't been there and have heard mix reports about how difficult it is to land ( inside beach verses the outside coast beach) and to get to the camping spots ( I read the camping is up on a hill?) Appreciate any intel you can provide.
    thanks, Patti
     
  3. AM

    AM Paddler

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    Inside beach is nice and sandy. Outside beach (the one with the kayak racks) is shelving rock. Could be dubious if the wind waves are up since its exposed to the Strait.

    Not to be a "kayak mom", but do check your current tables. I say this because I ran into some people on Wallace a few years ago who were thinking of paddling out to Dionisio for the day. They had no idea of the currents in Porlier Pass.

    Nice trip. One of my favourite areas.

    Cheers,
    Andrew
     
  4. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    Just curious- how did you access the park? As I recall, the trail from the end of the road on the west side of the island passes through First Nations land so is not allowed without permission. There is a road, but last time I was there, it has a gate on it since it passes through private land and the landowners do not want people getting to the park that way. I did see people riding bike on the road to get to the park IIRC. BC Parks says that the only access is by boat.
     
  5. kayakingkarebear

    kayakingkarebear Paddler

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    Hello All!
    To answer the first question: There are two beaches and one slab rock area for landing, but only the outer beach facing Porlier Pass is suitable for landing a kayak. The inside beach had a large semi-exposed reef at low tide and the slab rock would be dicey on a rough day. The campsite pads are up on a bluff but there are other places to throw a tent down closer to the water without risking terrain destruction.

    The second question about access: We hiked in down the private land road past the gate. We talked to a local and she said her hiking group always uses it and in all the years have never had an issue with being confronted for trespassing.
     
  6. kayakingkarebear

    kayakingkarebear Paddler

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    this view is from the bluff with Porlier Pass in the far distance
     

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  7. kayakingkarebear

    kayakingkarebear Paddler

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    another beach pic
     

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  8. kayakingkarebear

    kayakingkarebear Paddler

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    kayak racks?
     

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  9. kayakingkarebear

    kayakingkarebear Paddler

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    this shot looks directly at the entrance to the inner beach-looking somewhat northeast. This was at low tide.
     

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  10. kayakingkarebear

    kayakingkarebear Paddler

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    This shot is of the much preferred outer beach. The relatively sheltered bay lends itself to landing and launching but beware that Porlier Pass is just outside the mouth of this bay and currents can be a real hazard.
     

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  11. Peppermint Patty

    Peppermint Patty New Member

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    Thanks Kayakingkarebear for posting the photos & info about the beaches. I'm heading there next week :D
     
  12. designer

    designer Paddler

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    I spent two days there this summer. First - VERY IMPORTANT - Though you might plan to go through the pass at Slack Current, the wind might have other ideas. When we went through, at the benign time, we had at least four foot swells - the kind where you don't see your paddling partner when you are in the trough. That said, the next day (and later the same day) it was as smooth as can be.

    Second - if the pass looks dicey, there are many bays along the north edge you can rest in and wait it out.

    When I asked my partner why we didn't put in there, he said it would have been a long carry to the campground at that end - plus leaving the boats so far away.

    Once we got around the corner and down the east side, it smoothed out a bit. But still, if you are planning on camping at Sandstone Camp (the one with the boat racks) you will not be landing on sand/shells, etc. It is a rock shelf. And low tide, with swells wasn't fun. At a higher tide, you can slide up to smoother rock higher up.

    Note that you will be unloading your boats there and carrying the gear a bit uphill to the tent area. You might want to have some stay at the boats and maybe relay the gear to the base of the steep part - having someone take it from there.

    AFTER the boats are empty, you can carry them up the same hill to the racks mentioned in previous posts.

    There is a warning/suggestion (not a mandate) to boil the water for 5 minutes but the camp host said he been drinking it straight for months with no problem. He said it is tested every two weeks and if there is more than 1 ppm of something, they issue the warning. He said that "something" came in at 2 ppm which he considered acceptable risk.

    We had the whole SandStone camp area to ourselves. I think it is a little less than a half mile round trip hike from there to the water source at the northern end.

    Fantastic Views East from the camp.

    Paul