Doug's Tern 14 build...

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by Doug, May 31, 2006.

  1. Doug

    Doug Paddler

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
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    Location:
    Vancouver
    I've been building a Tern 14 for some time now. I seem to work on it consistently for a week and then leave it for a week or two with only sporadic building.

    My blog has a Tern 14 category in it, here is a link to the blog entries: Tern 14

    Here is a direct link to my gallery, where many pictures have a little bit of building info: Tern 14 Gallery

    If you have any questions you can contact me via this forum or the blog.

    Doug
     
  2. chodups

    chodups Paddler

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    I like the black seams....

    ....adds some complexity to the job and any seam that isn't fair will be really obvious but I like the the idea and the look. Good luck with that. I'll be watching to see how that progresses.

    Ain't a good scarper the best friend ever?
     
  3. chodups

    chodups Paddler

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    What I meant to say was:
    I like the black seams. Adds some complexity to the job and any seam that isn't fair will be really obvious but I like the the idea and the look. Good luck with that. I'll be watching to see how that progresses.

    Ain't a good scarper the best friend ever?
     
  4. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    May 15, 2005
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    give a big flatfile a whirl on drips or blobs. if the drips are discrete (rather than loads of them) you can concentrate huge pressure which evens out when close to flush. i use files abt 50% of the time w/ scrapers the other.

    .
     
  5. Doug

    Doug Paddler

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
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    194
    Location:
    Vancouver

    Well, I don't think I would really recommend the black seams. It is a huge pain in the butt really. I precoated the panels with epoxy so that any extra seam epoxy wouldn't have black pigment soak into the wood. The problem is that even with masking, a reasonable amount of epoxy hits the panel outside of the seam. Scraping is tedious, and it gets quite risky if you scrape/sand all the way through the epoxy to the wood. I didn't realize there was a risk of the "halo effect" prior to doing this.

    My main worry before starting was the same as yours: that seam width changes would be really obvious. This is true, but I don't think it's a big deal. When you stand back the lines look great. Upon closer inspection you see the black seam width changes. I also have places where the black epoxy spread over the edge of the seam on the flatter seams (such as the center seam down the stern deck). The only way to completely get rid of this is to scrape/sand it all the way down, but then you run the risk of the halo effect.

    I wonder how people go about pre-staining their panels prior to building? I think they run into the same problems as I've outlined. Maybe they are just a lot better at putting epoxy in the seams!

    And yes, I love my scraper. The most used tool to date is my Sandvik/Bahlco 1" scraper.

    Doug