Fibreglass Kayak Repair

Discussion in 'General Paddling Discussions' started by dut, Nov 3, 2008.

  1. dut

    dut Paddler

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Messages:
    69
    Location:
    Sidney
    Can anybody recommend someplace to repair a small hole in a fibreglass kayak. I'm looking for someone in the lower mainland.

    Thanks for your help.

    Barry
     
  2. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Messages:
    9,305
    Location:
    Beautiful BC
  3. thief

    thief Paddler

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    Messages:
    141
    Location:
    The North Shore of Massa-who-setts
    <object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/kIZ8sK4bWJQ&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/kIZ8sK4bWJQ&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>


    Doesn't my boss make it look so fricken easy?????
    ARGH!!!!

    but it is a good video...
     
  4. rider

    rider Paddler

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    1,743
    Location:
    Coquitlam,BC
    Keep in mind that keel line by far the easiest spot to repair and not have it look like crap. And while the job shown in the video was done probably adequately,it could've been done much stronger,especially seeing as how it's a pretty high wear/impact area.
     
  5. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

    Joined:
    May 31, 2005
    Messages:
    5,631
    Location:
    Astoria, Oregon, USA
    Totally agree. I think they slapped in some chopped strand/resin mix. I did not see any cloth or roving or mat, and I did not see any supporting release material.

    Frankly, I've done better work than that, and I have very little experience in glass work. I surely would not use the video as a primary resource. A couple years back, Sea Kayaker ran a good article on how to repair a major ding.
     
  6. trystan13

    trystan13 Paddler

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    60
    Dave and Rider. Agree that the job could have been done better, but I have seen far worse damage repaired with much poorer repairs hold up for a long time... I would not be concerned with the integrity myself.

    Dave, what do you mean by roving and supporting release material? Not familiar with these terms.

    Cheers, Andrew

    Link to Sea Kayker article for those interested
    http://www.seakayakermag.com/2006/Feb06/Gel-Coat01.htm

    Note: I believe "Airdry" is sometimes what is added for the same effect as wax. That is what I am familiar with being sold at Vancouver area kayak shops.
     
  7. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

    Joined:
    May 31, 2005
    Messages:
    5,631
    Location:
    Astoria, Oregon, USA
    Andrew, I may have been harsh or out of line, if there is more going on than I could see in the video. Roving is a heavier form of cloth. Supporting release material would be any surface underneath that mimics the hull contour but does not stick to the resin. There might be something inside like that, but I could not tell from the video.
     
  8. andreas

    andreas Paddler

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,163
    Location:
    Victoria BC
    I don't think that there was anything wrong with this repair. Using strand putty is common, nothing to worry about. And because it is wear area it actually is of great benefit to have some tough material on there. The only thing I would have done different , is, spraying the gel coat. Using a brush is not wrong by any means, it just involves more sanding and buffing after....
     
  9. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

    Joined:
    May 31, 2005
    Messages:
    5,631
    Location:
    Astoria, Oregon, USA
    Andreas,

    I am accustomed to use mat or roving as the primary structural ingredient for hull repairs. Are you saying that chopped fibers give as much strength as those alternatives? Or, maybe the advantage of mat/roving is that it will flex some, making it important to use those materials on areas which will need to flex?

    That strand putty will be extremely rigid, which would be OK on the keel line, where there should not be any flexure, I suppose.
     
  10. trystan13

    trystan13 Paddler

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    60
    Not to harsh at all... I just wanted to point out that kayaks are way tougher than most people think, and to not fear trying a repair yourself. There are probably a dozen different ways to repair the damage in the video that would be sufficient to keep it seaworthy.
     
  11. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

    Joined:
    May 31, 2005
    Messages:
    5,631
    Location:
    Astoria, Oregon, USA
    Glad you did it. I agree there are lots of ways to fix a keel damaged like that. I learned something here. I did not know about that strand paste stuff.
     
  12. RoyN

    RoyN Paddler

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Messages:
    435
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    I wouldn't get the stuff already mixed. You can get milled glass, sometimes referred to as kitty fur that you can mix with resin, then add catalyst and get the same thing.

    There's no need for a backer since the damage did not go all the way through the glass. All you need to do is replace the material that was ground off, then gelcoat over the top.

    About the only thing I would do that was different was to spray the gelcoat so there's less finish sanding.
     
  13. andreas

    andreas Paddler

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,163
    Location:
    Victoria BC
    Yes, strand putty (bought and homemade) can be stronger than a layup! Although it will be heavier than a laminate, it will be easier to work with.