finger

Discussion in 'Paddling Safety' started by fester, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. fester

    fester Paddler

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    Has anyone else noticed the right hand of the guy in the photo on page 12 of the recent issue of wavelength ?
     
  2. Komatiq

    Komatiq Paddler

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    Don't know if this is what you had in mind but if I were in a similar situation I would try and keep my fingers out of the area between the ropes leading to the bow toggle. If the other boat capsized suddenly it could make for a rather painful & potentially dangerous experience. :(
     
  3. fester

    fester Paddler

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    That was the first thing that got my attention. It is a really good example of how easy it is to put your finger in the loop. There's several other things in the picture that are quite telling.
     
  4. GordB

    GordB Paddler

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    I just had a look at that pix.

    What other things did you find telling from the pix?

    I was struck by the look of a partially inflated paddle float ( look like kid's waterwings ) and no sign of paddle.
    Surf like wave tops so where is his brain bucket?

    Those are about the only things I can see with these inexperienced eyes.

    What should I be seeing that might help in the course of my paddling?
     
  5. fester

    fester Paddler

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    Since this photo accompanies an article which reccomends "debugging" rescues I figured it's a good candidiate for critical analysis

    As you said finger in the loop, no helmet and where's his paddle? Maybe it's on a tether?
    Is that a paddle float? Was he attempting to deploy it or has it been retrieved from drifting out of his boat?
    The boat is an NDK product and unlesss retro fitted, doesn't have any rigging for a paddle float. Either way the conditions would make a successfull paddle float re-entry for anyone like me next to impossible.

    His boat is hull up and he's at the stern. With the boat hull up there's no where for a rescuer to grab hold. If upon exiting he had righted his boat and moved to the bow, the rescuer would know which end to move to, and have something to grab when he got there. This saves time when the rescuer arrives at the bow and makes contact with the swimmer and his boat at the same time. The rescuer also gets where he needs to be to empty the swamped boat

    It appears as thought he is holding an end toggle in each hand. not a good idea at any time and especially in a tide race. If the boats move apart he's going to be a human bungee. It's way too easy to put your finger in the toggle loop. Some people modify thier end toggles to a single line. This prevents injury and discourages use of the end grabs as carry handles.

    It's easy to be critical of others. I try to be as nit picky about my own behaviour. I'm sure there are thing's I've missed. My intention is to generate interest in what seems to be a good article and raise some points to help people streamline thier rescues