Foot pedal modifications

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by Philip.AK, Sep 3, 2012.

  1. Philip.AK

    Philip.AK Paddler

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    Where your feet rest in the boat is a pretty important contact point, so I figure some folks out there have messed with this component. Feel free to post up any mods you find comfy and functional.

    I came across a thick fiberglass I-beam at our warehouse and cut some sections out of it to make an angled pad that I bolted onto the foot pedals that came in our valley boats. While not night-and-day different than the stock pegs, it is more comfortable especially when I wear thinner-soled water slippers due to the bigger platform and more anatomically-correct angle. I just made a second set for my wife's boat.

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  2. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Good tip on the footpeg plates. Thanks!
    Reminds me of the aluminum foot plates in my Mariner.

    Off-topic, I know..., but:
    Is that your switch for the bilge pump that's visible in the last pic?
     
  3. Philip.AK

    Philip.AK Paddler

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    Yup, that's the reed switch block. You can see the shadow of the puck which contains the magnet just to the left of it through the deck.
     
  4. AM

    AM Paddler

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    In my own Mariner I often take out the footpegs and brace against the float bags. This is super comfy and ensures that I have filled up as much of the bow as possible.
     
  5. Holmes375

    Holmes375 Paddler

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    I've installed an Onno carbon fiber foot bar in each of my boats. Pat does a nice job of these accessories, they're available for rudder and non-rudder applications.

    The foot bar attaches to Yakima/Werner foot braces whose rails have been made parallel with longer hardware at the aft mount location. I modify my Yakima rails further by machining an additional adjustment notch in the ends to better accommodate my long sticks.

    The foot bar retains the ability to adjust for leg length but it is a bit fiddly to do so as compared to regular braces. I also augment my foot bar with a facing of 3/8" mini-cell foam to pamper my feet. Very comfortable, next best thing to a padded bulkhead foot rest. After I installed and used the first one I knew I'd be ordering more of these.

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  6. camshaft

    camshaft Paddler

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    The new split food pedals design looks interesting, compaired to the older design where the hole pedal rotated
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  7. Mark_Schilling

    Mark_Schilling Paddler

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    I found that the larger the foot peg, the more comfortable I was - I'm sure that's the reasoning for your 'oversized' foot pegs. So, the ultimate solution (for me, at least) was to get rid of the foot pegs altogether. I did this first on my NDK Explorer - I removed the foot pegs and rails, cut out for forward bulkhead and moved it back by nearly a foot. Well, that's not completely true - I took out the bulkhead and threw it in the garbage, then made a new one to fit its new location perfectly. I laminated a few layers of glass cloth so it was at least as stiff as the original, then glassed it in front and back before gluing a thin piece of mini-cell foam to it for added comfort. Obviously I was left with foot rail bolt holes so I patched those with glass on the inside and gelcoat on the outside. The benefits of this are not only a perfect fitting, very comfortable boat, but also less 'floodable' volume in the cockpit, and increased volume in the forward hatch (enough for about another week's food!). On the down side... well, it was a lot of work, and I might have a hard time selling the boat since no-one taller than me could fit without major modifications. But for me, the Explorer is the perfect multi-week expedition boat (still plays nicely!) so I don't foresee wanting to sell it anyway.

    My Romany was custom made without foot rails (or a skeg)... but it was made for the (tall) previous owner, not me. So, I did the same thing days after I bought it - cut out the existing bulkhead, laminated a new one and glassed it in. Fits a little snugger than the Explorer. The result is that I can now take my 'play boat' on trips up to about a week, or perhaps longer when sharing gear (we did a 2-week trip in the modified Explorer and Romany with plenty of room to spare).

    REALLY nice to have that nice big foot contact area when we have a long day on the water or when playing in surf etc.
     
  8. rider

    rider Paddler

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    I made a creeker/bulkhead ww style footbrace for my Delphin,much happier since, especially for Caitlin who sits in the boat ww style with heels together.
     
  9. Jacquot

    Jacquot Paddler

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    Now you've got me wondering... This is a question I've been thinking of posting. Should I ever decide to get a new boat, I will definitely be considering ordering one with a custom forward bulkhead given the comfort aspect noted above. As an aside, since I'm only 5'0" tall, that would definitely kill any resale value.

    At present, I use that big cockpit volume in front of my feet for water on trips. If I moved the bulkhead, water would have to go in a hatch and I must admit I don't really trust my water containers. If one should leak in the cockpit, not an issue. I might trust a Dromedary, but I just can't stand the taste of water from my kitchen faucet after it's been in one of those.

    So, if you don't carry water in the cockpit, where's the next best place to put it? I'd guess day hatch, but that's the small opening on my Romany. Squeezing containers in and out through there might lead to a leak.

    Jacquie
     
  10. Alana

    Alana Wave Seeker

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    +1 to a custom bulkhead! Nothing beats having a good solid platform for your feet, especially when you have a layer of minicell foam on it :big_thumb

    My Avocet lv has a custom bulkhead. That combined with extra minicell foam carved to fit on my thighbraces means that very few people fit in my boat :p

    As for water in your boat, I place use Dromdary bags and place them in the stern hatch, as close to the center of the boat, and the keel, as possible. I even out the weigh by putting the remaining heavy items in the front hatch.
     
  11. windancer

    windancer Paddler

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    These look very interesting, can you elaborate a little on them.

    Terry
     
  12. Holmes375

    Holmes375 Paddler

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    The foot bar is a carbon fiber board Pat makes after to spec from measurements provided by the paddler. He'll have you measure the inner dimension between the Yakima rails at the fore and aft mount positions.

    The top of the foot bar has a 90 degree bend with a soft radius. The lip is about an inch. Envision an inverted L shape with oriented toward the bow. This gives a nice top edge for the toes.

    Pat provides the hardware in a length necessary to re-mount the rails in a parallel manner. Takes a few tries before you get things aligned well enough to allow fore and aft adjustment but it just takes a bit of patience.

    I use a couple of clamps to hold the board in place on the foot braces and I use masking tape on the board so I can mark the mounting positions. I mount my boards as high as I can so I have to watch for overhead clearance regarding recessed deck fittings and such. Once I make sure I'm clear of things and the board appears even from side to side I feel the back of the foot braces to avoid running a screw through one of the structural ribs. Its quite easy to feel the back side and mark the screw locations appropriately on the front. I also mark off the board-to-brace position so I can remove the board, drill my screw holes and then clamp it back on the braces in the same position. The holes drilled in the board now serve as guides to drill through the braces. Pat supplies self tapping SS screws but I prefer to use #10 screws, washers and thread-lock cap nuts.

    Once I have the board in place and check it for full function I remove it again and fashion a minicell face for comfort. I use a Forstner bit to make the access holes for the screw heads but the thin foam is easy to work using a variety of other methods. Glue up the foam, let her sit overnight and then put it back together.

    It wouldn't be hard to make these yourself if you've done any boat building at all. Cedar-strip or marine ply panels properly glassed would work well and can be fashioned from scraps in many cases.

    If you want more information Pat is always up for a conversation about his products :) You can see the foot bar here as you'd receive it - its about halfway down the page: http://www.onnopaddles.com/components.html