For the boat builders - tablesaw for sale

Discussion in 'WCP Buy & Sell' started by Steve_Fairbairn, Sep 7, 2006.

  1. Steve_Fairbairn

    Steve_Fairbairn Paddler

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    I have a Ryobi BT3000 table saw with sliding table, extension rails, two fences, two accessory tables, micropositioner, mitre slot table extension, homemade 4-foot extension table with router insert and misc bits and pieces that I'd like to sell as a package. I'm open to offers.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Komatiq

    Komatiq Paddler

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    Need more input......... :wink:

    hp, rpm, how old, cast top or alum, weight ... you know, the GOOD stuff.


    Thanks
     
  3. Steve_Fairbairn

    Steve_Fairbairn Paddler

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    Here is a link to the Users Manual. In a nutshell:
    • Blade dia. - 10"
    • 120 Volt/15 Amp motor
    • 4800 RPM
    • Aluminum top & accessory tables
    • 8 foot fence rails that are adjustable anywhere along the saw
    • Sliding mitre table that can be mounted on either side of the top
    • Built in router/jigsaw mounts on both accessory tables
    • 4 foot extension table w/Rousseau router mounting plate
    • 2 fences - these saws are renowned for their fences
    • Standard and dado throat plates
    • Micrometer fence adjuster
    • Numerous other minor accessories such as mitre guage clamp, T-nuts, various mounting brackets, etc.
    • Built-in sealed dust collection port
    This saw has a bit of a cult following. There is even a dedicated fan website.
     
  4. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Sans the extensions and the micrometer accessory, these have been mainstays for better woodworkers down here, for a while.
     
  5. Komatiq

    Komatiq Paddler

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    Thanks Steve,
    I'll look through the maual in a little more detail later this evening and get back to you..... if it isn't sold by then. :wink:

    Have to admit I haven't priced much from Ryobi other than the 13" Planer I have of theirs and it does a great job for the work i'm doing. I'd be quite serious about a purchase if I decide to lean that way.

    Are you moving up to something bigger?
     
  6. DarenN

    DarenN Paddler

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    hi all;
    i have that same saw. but without a lot of the accessories that Steve has. it's been a GREAT saw through a half dozen boats and lots of other projects. i reccomend it, highly.
    DarenN.......
     
  7. Steve_Fairbairn

    Steve_Fairbairn Paddler

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    No big rush. The rails, tables and accessories are currently in storage in my crawl space and the saw is sitting in my shop which is still under construction. Let me know if you are interested and I will dig all the bits and pieces out and assemble it so you can try it out.

    I'm selling it because I bought a Delta X5 Unisaw today.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    I think I'm suffering from tool envy. 8O :lol:

    *****
     
  9. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    That Unisaw solves the main problem with my Dewalt: won't do plywood worth a durn!

    I am definitely envious!
     
  10. Komatiq

    Komatiq Paddler

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    Now fella's, no need for envy. I'm almost positive that your local dealer would be MORE than happy to supply each of you with a shiney new Unisaw just like Steve's........ :lol: :lol: :lol:

    Astoriadave, sheets of plywood are a real pain, MDF.... well, best not go there.
    I found setting the sheets on saw horses and cutting them down with my 7 1/4" & a straight edge works pretty good and saves on hernia operations too.
     
  11. Steve_Fairbairn

    Steve_Fairbairn Paddler

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    Can you not build outfeed and extension tables for your Dewalt to handle plywood? Full sheets of plywood are always a pain on a tablesaw. I generally cut the full sheets down with a skilsaw and then trim them to size with the tablesaw.
     
  12. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Yeah, I could justify building outfeed and infeed tables if I had a larger shop and did not have to break down a setup like that in order to have enough room to move around the 20-foot power boat (here: http://tinyurl.com/zb3du ) that takes up most of the shop. I use some roller stands, mostly for ripping, but they do not do the support job needed for larger panels.

    Like Komatiq, I use a Skilsaw and a straight edge to cut panels and plywood to exact size. The straight edge I use has a clever low-profile clamping feature which allows the motor body of the saw to ride above the clamped straight edge, so I can put the fat part of the saw over the retained piece. Works well and is 100% portable; cuts four feet and shorter only.

    I still want a Unisaw, though!
     
  13. Steve_Fairbairn

    Steve_Fairbairn Paddler

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    Shop space is always at a premium and planning for space consuming shop furniture like outfeed or extension tables is always a big challenge if even possible. My plan for the new saw is to build a collapsible, folding outfeed table that will fold down behind the saw when not in actual use. The back of the saw will be facing the garage door so I can open the door to allow room for extra long outfeed. I sprung for the mobile base for the saw so that I can move it around as required.

    When I first started building my new shop I had planned for all of the bigger machinery to be stationary but, during the course of finishing off the interior of the shop I've had to move all of my machinery at least a half a dozen times and will have to move them a few more times before I am finished. Most of my machines did not have mobile bases, making it a huge ordeal but I've added a couple of mobile bases and have most everything else sitting temporarily on furniture dollies. Eventually everything is going to be on wheels except my lathe stand.

    You're going to have a lot of room in your shop when you finish that boat! I hope you're not planning on actually putting a car in there. :wink:
     
  14. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Well, I better, or certain aspects of my relationship with my fiance will cease (I'm told). :lol:

    Yowsa on mobile bases. Whenever Rockler has theirs on sale, I buy one, just to have one around.
     
  15. Komatiq

    Komatiq Paddler

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    Astoriadave, I bit the bullet and sacrificed an 8"x8' slice off a new sheet of 5/8" mdf for an 8' skil saw guide, that way you can do full panels too and you have a factory edge for the l-o-n-g cuts.

    Funny things about shops and space........ last boat building project I was involved with was in a shop that could be considered cavernous but by the time we got a 65' trawler yacht and a 40' deck/flybridge mold in there it got REALLY small all of a sudden........ :lol: :lol:

    My take is, shops are always too small cause we tend to just add more stuff to fill up any available space.
     
  16. Steve_Fairbairn

    Steve_Fairbairn Paddler

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    I think that's one of those natural laws of woodworking right after 'you can never have enough clamps' and 'every new project requires a new tool'. :wink: