Go Pro best practise

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by pad1982, Jul 20, 2016.

  1. pad1982

    pad1982 New Member

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    Hi folks. I've just inherited a used second hand GoPro from my nephew. I've been paddling for approx 18 months now but have never incorporated it with my passion for photography for fear of water damage to my camera. I am totally new to GoPro's but appreciate that they are waterproof and designed for exactly this kind of use without fear of damage. My question is what have others found to be the best way to mount their GoPro while paddling? Is it best to mount it to the kayak or head mount it to one's self? (see photo) It's all new to me so any tips or advice would be much appreciated.
     
  2. pad1982

    pad1982 New Member

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    I did a search for kayak mounts for GoPro and it seems there are numerous options. What have others found to be the best angles to mount at?

    https://www.google.com/search?q=gop...ved=0ahUKEwjOtKSthIbOAhVGGpQKHcA3AmoQ_AUIBygC
     
  3. scott0_1

    scott0_1 New Member

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  4. pad1982

    pad1982 New Member

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    Thanks for the pointers scott0_1. The video was especially helpful in giving me an idea of what to expect. I'm thinking that kayak mounted rather than head mounted is going to prove the better route to go.
     
  5. scott0_1

    scott0_1 New Member

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    Way more comfortable! The suction cup also lets you move it around your boat to get different angles.
     
  6. Peter-CKM

    Peter-CKM Paddler

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    Some random thoughts.

    Suction cups work great with composite (and likely thermoformed), but not with rotomolded plastic. No matter how you attach it, make sure you leash it.

    If it is not a version with a remote, you pretty much need it to be within reach so you can turn it on and off. Helmet definitely works. Maybe in front of you, but within reach. Or on a mast, if you can move the mast around to turn on and off.

    The cameras have very wide angle lens on them. Don't bother trying to capture anything more than a boat length away. And waves that are huge in real life look tiny on these cameras.
     
  7. Ninja

    Ninja New Member

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    Besides being somewhat uncomfortable, a head mounted camera "looks around" too much unless you really concentrate on using your head as a camera mount. A front deck mounted camera on a quick-release gives you the option to grab the camera get a shot when that whale breaches. I use a chest mount on my bike to solve the "looking around" problem but I've never tried it in my boat. I'd think the paddle would be in the way and I'd still be looking around.
     
  8. Philip.AK

    Philip.AK Paddler

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    I've made a few videos, and watched a lot more. Variety is the key. You can't explore too many angles. Get innovative. I think making a short PVC pipe mast behind the cockpit with the camera looking down and forward so the paddler is in the foreground would be very cool (in conditions that would allow such a setup). I've sunk cameras to the sea floor looking up and paddled over them. I've made propeller-head contraptions so that the camera can spin around me. I've placed the camera on rocks, etc. Just seek variety, and then be prepared to toss most of the footage. :doh:

    See if these give you any ideas:
    https://vimeo.com/46725100
    https://vimeo.com/16879009 (actually a mountain biking video I made, but it incorporates all my tricks)