Hi!

Discussion in 'General Paddling Discussions' started by GoatBoy, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. GoatBoy

    GoatBoy Paddler

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    [​IMG]

    Screwed around with sit on tops a couple of times, best was in Mexico.

    Planning on getting started in Touring. Going to take lessons here:
    http://www.ecomarine.com/lessons/index.html

    Figuring for summer weather, I'd be wearing something like:
    Synthetic sport shorts
    Synthetic T (Underarmour or something?)
    NeoPrene Shorty
    Microfleece on top.

    Does that sound about right? Plan on buying this stuff straightaway, nothing against the retailer but sharing a wetsuit just doesn't feel right to me.

    Figure to buy the rest in bits and pieces as I go along. (Pump, Float, Skirt, etc.)

    I have a very good understanding of weather and navigation, very similar to Aviation which I have a background in.

    Anybody have any tips? Things you wished you'd done differently? Must have equipment?

    I'm a bigger guy, 6'4", 210ish. I imagine size will make finding suitable gear and clothing difficult...

    Thanks much.
     
  2. rider

    rider Paddler

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    Welcome!
    On clothing.
    I'd skip the shorty suit and buy a Farmer John suit that you can use all year-round. My guess your size would be XL-T, extra large-tall, or XXL, whichever fits right.
    Long as it's not cotton, doesn't really matter a huge deal what you wear under your wetsuit. It only matters if you wear a drytop over it. Otherwise, microfleece,thin polyester, spandex, will all be about the same when wet. Shorts are up to you, doesn't really matter when you got the wetsuit on. But it does make for a less of a "men in tights" look than just the wetsuit alone.
     
  3. ken_vandeburgt

    ken_vandeburgt Paddler

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    Not a good plan. With kayaking you mostly have to buy the gear before you even get on the water. Some of it is required by law as per the boating guide.

    http://www.tc.gc.ca/publications/EN/TP5 ... TP511E.PDF
     
  4. Redcedar

    Redcedar Paddler

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    Another safety link ... worth watching and learning just how dangerous cool and cold water is ,

    http://vimeo.com/4534662
     
  5. GoatBoy

    GoatBoy Paddler

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    Legal and basic necessities are included with the rentals for no/little extra charge.

    Float/PFD/Throwbag/etc.

    Sorry should have specified better. Will use store stuff and gradually pick up my own gear a bit at a time.
     
  6. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    Plan your immersion gear around the temperature of the water you are going to paddle in. If you can't survive an hour or 2 in the water with what you are planning to wear, it's probably not correct. Like Rider says, nix the shorty...
     
  7. Jurfie

    Jurfie Paddler

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    Welcome to the site, and welcome to the sport!

    I took lessons (PC Level 1) at Ecomarine; they're great. Just watch out if you get Gord - he likes to drown his students. (hi GordB!)

    As for clothing: I totally agree with rider. Don't bother with a shorty; go with a farmer john. Shorties will chafe something fierce with the repetitive paddling motions, making for a miserable day (and following days!). If you haven't seen a FJ, they are sleeveless and usually have full legs to the ankle. I know what you mean about communal wetsuits; it doesn't feel right being that intimate with strangers. :wink:

    MEC has some inexpensive synthetic tees for underneath. As for on top, I use a BARE Chillguard. Combined with a decent PFD, this combination will keep your core quite warm while in the water, without being too hot when dry. Obviously, if you want to do more exposed trips, paddle solo, or intend to get wet, add more layers and perhaps a drytop. The ultimate is a drysuit, but not necessary especially when you are starting out (and likely sticking with local day-paddles). Don't get all caught up in buying all the greatest gear (unless money is no object) to the point where it gets too cost prohibitive to get on the water; just be safe.

    Finding sizes shouldn't be too difficult; I'm 6'-6" and 230ish. Most of my stuff is XL, but an XL-T farmer john would be more comfortable, though harder to find. Finding a comfortable boat, however, is more difficult, depending on your inseam and the size of your feet.

    Tip: Be careful with footwear if you are size 12 or larger. I originally used a pair of Keen sandals which are great on land, but they are too chunky for many boats. Get a pair of lower profile neoprene shoes/boots and you will open up more kayak options. I picked up a pair of Deep See boots (which are flexible and fit nicely over drysuit booties) at Deep Cove Outdoors, but there are other brands out there (Chota, MEC, Brooks, etc.)

    Have fun and happy paddling! :cool
     
  8. GoatBoy

    GoatBoy Paddler

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    Thanks everybody. Farmer john it is.

    One other thing I forgot to mention. I won't have a vehicle until the fall. I'm in between right now, and sentenced to the 74 person limousine for the time being.

    How much of an effect will this have? Jurfie you said you took lessons at Eco, do they have anything resembling an outdoor shower or change room facilities at English bay or Jericho? I don't mind hauling wet crap around, but I don't imagine it would be fun coming home covered in dried salt water. (And I figure I'll be spending time in the water as a new guy)

    Regarding footwear, I was figuring some old low profile runners, and then make a decision based on experience.
     
  9. Jurfie

    Jurfie Paddler

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    There is an outdoor shower at the Jericho location; no curtains and no hot water! I just wore my drysuit under it; it rinsed off the salt water from the parts on me that were exposed (as well as the drysuit). It is COLD water, but at least there is good pressure.

    Oh, and during lessons, you will DEFINITELY be spending time wet! :cool

    As for change room facilities; well the answer is yes, sort of. There are individual stalls (maybe 3'x3') to change, but if you are expecting a locker room type change room, then no. There are (open) cubbies to stash your clothes, though. If you are worried about security, just get a small drybag to keep your valuables with you in the boat.

    Old runners should be fine to start out. Just be sure you can swim in them, or kick them off if need be. They won't be as comfortable wet as neoprene boots, but they'll do in a pinch. Also make sure the laces are tucked in to the shoes to reduce the possibility of hanging up on the rudder pedals/footbraces while wet-exiting (I got the bungy of my Keens caught once, and it was a scary experience). :shock:
     
  10. Jurfie

    Jurfie Paddler

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    Oh, to add to this: there are washrooms at the Jericho Sailing Club building, but I don't recall if there are proper shower facilities. It is a bit of a hike (maybe 100m?) to the clubhouse from the Ecomarine beach area.
     
  11. blondie

    blondie Paddler

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    Yes, there are public bathrooms in the Jericho Sailing club. There are showers as well, but these are for members only and are accessed by keycard. You might be able to sneak in somehow. You can buy a membership (~$70) but if you're just doing a lesson or two it might not be worth it for you.
     
  12. GoatBoy

    GoatBoy Paddler

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    OK, so question.

    A) Take the bus to lessons and enjoy paddling in the summer. (For those that have taken lessons at Jericho, can you speculate how bad this would be?)

    B) Wait until vehicle is purchased in september, lessons in the pool and put off paddling till next summer.

    Cheers.
     
  13. blondie

    blondie Paddler

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    I'm not totally clear why you would decide not to take the lessons this summer: is it just because you wouldn't have a car? Or don't want to take the bus when you are covered in salt water?

    I think lessons outside in the summer would be far preferable to pool lessons. Sure, the water might be colder and saltier, but that is the nature of the sport.
     
  14. Jurfie

    Jurfie Paddler

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    Go for the lessons now! Why wait when you can get out on the water this summer. Plus, you may as well get used to cold(er) salt water dips than warm pool sessions, IMHO.

    As for how bad it would be; I assume you mean on the bus on the way home? Well, I drove from Jericho to Steveston apres-paddle and it wasn't too bad. A refreshing rinse under the cold water outdoor shower to get the worst of the salt out of your hair and face, and you'll be fine until you get home. Just bring a towel and a change of clothes.

    Alternatively, you could not bother with the rinse-off and ensure a seat to yourself!! :lol: :wink:
     
  15. sushiy

    sushiy Paddler

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    GB,
    Why do you need a changing room and shower?
    I've never seen a guy using a changing room after kayaking around here.
    Just wear a quick drying sports shorts under the suit and by the time you catch your bus, it should be dry. Salt water? Towel youeself and you should be smelling like surfer boy, much better than office worker covered with his sweat all day in warm office.

    I'll choose salt water over fresh water anytime. Fresh water is hard on my nose, I don't have the pain in my nose with salt water.
     
  16. GoatBoy

    GoatBoy Paddler

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    Cheers folks. Thanks much, mind is made up. Will be in classes two weeks from now.

    Sorry about all the questions. I'll let you know how poorly I do on day one, should be at least one funny story.

    :D
     
  17. GoatBoy

    GoatBoy Paddler

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    A changing room to store valuables. (Car keys, cell phone, etc.)
    A shower to clean off a bit before settling in to a 90 minute trip home within 6 inches of 4 other people.

    Not required, but sure would be nice.
     
  18. blondie

    blondie Paddler

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    You can leave your valuables behind the desk at Ecomarine. They're good folks.
     
  19. lance_randy

    lance_randy Paddler

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    Just watch out for that mikec character...
     
  20. sushiy

    sushiy Paddler

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    For valuable items, I would not recomend storing it in changing room unless it has good locker, especially when whole world know where you might have those when you are on the water. :shock:
    You will need dry bag or Pelican Box sooner or later, so I would recomend to get it now and store those items in it in the hatch while you take lesson.
    If you can't find shower or rinsing hose, those baby wipes works good too. That is what I use during camping.

    Have fun at the class!!