Kayak: large paddler

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by HoodCanal, Aug 30, 2013.

  1. HoodCanal

    HoodCanal New Member

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    I built two Spring Run Kayaks from Redfish three years ago. These boats work well for my wife and other normal sized human beings but I need something larger.

    I'm 6'3" 255 lbs. I've looked at the Redfish Return and thought that was the boat I wanted to build. While it is a longer boat with a higher weight capacity I don't think it was designed for a larger paddler.

    I started looking at some of the Guillemot boats from Nick Schade and I'm interested in his designs for larger kayakers.

    I'm interested in opinions from larger kayakers who have boats that work well for them. This build will be a cedar strip.
     
  2. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    As you're strip building from plans, you can fairly easily slightly increase the building form's spacing and of course resize the cockpit to anything you want.
    It also is quite easy to get a print service to copy and increase the form width slightly while keeping the height as is (ie not change too many parameters). In any case, you'd want a conversation with the designer to keep your loading/sizing in the region desired.

    You also could check out oneoceans kayaks (http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/) as I think Vaclav has some larger load kayaks which are quite nice also.
    ie the cape ann might be a candidate:
    [​IMG]
     
  3. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    I can vouch for the Cape Ann as a nice all-rounder for a big paddler. I am not quite your size but mine feels best loaded somewhat, so it should match you pretty well. My size 11.5 feet fit fine under the regular deck. You might also want to look at the Laughing Loon kayaks, but I have not paddled one.
     
  4. JimmEh

    JimmEh Paddler

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    Nanoose bay, BC
  5. newfie in Alberta

    newfie in Alberta Paddler

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    A skin on frame could be built to your exact dimensions, excuse for another boat.
     
  6. HoodCanal

    HoodCanal New Member

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    Thanks for all the replies so far. My size 12 feet most definitely don't fit inside of the Spring Run. I end up taking my shoes off about an hour into the paddle. My wife paddles on like a duck out there and I just can't get comfortable.

    This boat will definitely be a cedar strip. I've got some clear 20' cedar logs waiting in the wings.
     
  7. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    You've built a few strip boats already, so you won't have a problem with scaling a design. Within reason, you can mess with the deck height without ruining the handling of the boat.
    My advice would be to try to find a hull you like, and that can support your weight ( enough displacement to not get down on its lines), and then raise the deck enough to make your foot/leg position comfortable (though sz 12 is not that big). It could require as little as one extra strip at the sheer, mid-boat. If you have the time, (once you decide on a hull with the paddling qualities you like), you can always build a quick/dirty 'middle of the boat' and experiment with deck raising, cockpit, etc...

    I don't think you said whether you are looking for a fun day-paddling boat that fits you, or a big/long/high capacity 'expedition'-type boat.

    I know what you mean about foot position - I wear size 10 neo boots and some kayaks feel tight on me. When some designers say: "fits size 12' they mean with your heels jammed together, feet/legs splayed and toes pointed forward. Taking some cross-sections of commercial boats that DO fit you will give you some idea of how much room YOU need.

    You can always mill strips from your logs to pass the time while working this out! :D
     
  8. HoodCanal

    HoodCanal New Member

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    I think for now most of my kayaking will be day trips. I would like a boat that is fairly stable and designed mostly for straight travel.

    I understand that I can modify the deck height but I would rather try something that has already been designed to fit a large person. I'm open to any ideas. There are much more experienced kayakers here than I.