Kyuquot Sound, Vancouver Island, BC 1-11 June 2016

Discussion in 'Trip Reports' started by alexsidles, Jun 14, 2016.

  1. Jill

    Jill Paddler

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    Thanks Alex, always enjoy your trip reports!
     
  2. Seasider

    Seasider Paddler

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    Thanks for the help. I have recently used Paint for screen shots and successfully pasted into e-mail. It didn't occur to me at the time to use it for text. Anyway, now I have managed to edit an image in Paint with text an arrows but when I hit copy, go to the already open WCP and hit paste(which shows up bold),nothing happens :?:
    Great link for the topo too!
     
  3. Pawistik

    Pawistik Paddler

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    Seasider, you'll need a couple more steps since you can't paste images directly into the WCP posts.

    I wonder if you mean you are using the Snipping Tool in microsoft to do your screen capture? If you are, save an image through that software, paying attention to where you save it and what you call it, then open it up as a separate step into Paint (unless your version is different than mine, which it may be). You also can use the print screen function on your keyboard which has you hitting the "Prt Sc" button or some variation of it, probably while hitting the function (fn) key at the same time. Either way, you want that image in the Paint software. Once you mark up that image all you want, resize it down to 800 pixels wide using the resize function in paint. Then save that image and again note it's location and what it's called. This should keep the modified image with the labels. You can then use the upload file function on WCP to insert an image into your post.
    Cheers,
    Bryan
     
  4. alexsidles

    alexsidles Paddler

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    So many interesting things to talk about!

    MAPS: Bryan is correct that the route map screenshot comes from the mappingsupport.com website, and the labels from a freeware drawing software called Paintbrush (a near-clone of MS Paint available for Mac). I used to use Garmin topos to create the route maps in my trip reports, but I only have the Windows version of the Garmin maps, and my Windows virtual machine software is no longer compatible with my current version of OS X. I could update the virtual machine for $60, but I'm so angry that they deliberately made their software go obsolete that I refuse to give them any money. I've fallen back on the mappingsupport.com website for making my route maps.

    PUFFINS: I was disappointed not to see Tufted Puffins. In fact, I also did not see any Common Murres or Cassin's Auklets, either, and the only Rhinoceros Auklet I saw was in the Strait of George on the ferry crossing. It was a very bad trip for alcids! Pigeon Guillemots and Marbeled Murrelets were present in low numbers, but that was it. I hoped the proximity to Solander Island would give me a shot at murres and puffins, but no such luck. I can only surmise they must forage out toward the open sea rather than in toward Checleset Bay.

    WOLVES: I saw two adult wolves on Spring Island in the Mission Group. Signage on the island told me they were a mated pair that had recently birthed a litter of pups. I heard the adults howling in the evening, and the pups starting yipping loudly in response. I did not ever see the pups; they stayed in the forest. It was very cool to hear them all interacting as a family.

    The adults patrolled the beach in the morning and afternoon, sometimes alone, sometimes as a pair. For the most part they ignored me and kept a great distance. They were two brief closer encounters: Early in the morning, I was making breakfast when one wolf emerged from around a rock and trotted past at a distance of 60 feet or so. It stopped to look at me briefly but did not approach closer. It then resumed patrolling the upland portion of the beach away from me.

    Later in the morning, around 10 or 11, both wolves were again present on the beach, perhaps a quarter to half a mile distant. One of the wolves approached me on the mud flats as I was loading my kayak. It did not approach in a straight line, but rather wandered slowly in my direction in the course of patrolling along the waterline. The second wolf moved off into the forest long before coming anywhere near me. The first wolf, now alone, continued moving along the waterline looking for food in the mud. I was right at the waterline, where I was putting gear into my boat. When the wolf's path took it past me at a distance of 40 feet or so, it stopped and watched me for a minute or two, then continued the waterline patrol route uninterrupted. Other than the period of watching, its attention was focused on the ground, looking for food. The wolf was fearless towards me but was respectful of my space and did not behave aggressively. At no time did I feel threatened by the animal.

    40 feet is pretty close. It's close enough to see individual wolf hairs. The picture I posted above in the trip report is actually less than full size. (I did that to hide the less-than-perfect focus and the noise from the sensor.) Here is a crop from a full-size picture:


    The wolves of Spring Island are a known commodity. Not only was there the signage on the island, a nature film crew spent several hours in a boat in the eastern bay filming the wolves as they made their beach patrols. In fact, it was a crew member on this boat who used hand and arm signals to alert me to the presence of the first wolf I saw on the beach the afternoon of my arrival.



    In addition to the wolves of Spring Island, another wolf approached my tent in the middle of the night on the Brooks Peninsula. I did not see it; I found its tracks in the morning. It had been trotting along the tideline for about a quarter mile when it spotted my tent, came up the beach to within about 40 feet of the tent, paced briefly back and forth, then resumed its tideline patrol. As with the wolves on Spring Island, I believe this wolf was investigating an aberrance in its habitat, not sizing me up as prey.

    Although I did not feel threatened by any of the wolf behavior or tracks I saw, Sherry at Fair Harbour told me that last year (or she might have said the year before), a person on one of the islands was bitten on the arm by a wolf and had to be evacuated by boat. I did not ask what, if anything, the victim had been doing to provoke or entice the wolf. I do not buy into the theory that "if a predator stares at you, it's automatically acting aggressively towards you," but it is true that wild animals are unpredictable and on very rare occasions do attack humans.

    I personally would not avoid a beach simply because of the presence of inquisitive wolves. If I did, most of the BC and Alaska coasts would be off-limits to me! The same is true of black bears. The only animals in our region whose presence on a beach makes me uncomfortable are brown bears—those I try not to camp around, but even if I do have to camp in brown bear habitat, I simply take ordinary precautions and do not worry myself too much. Usually, they just keep their distance and I watch them quietly and happily. I have driven off nearby brown bears on several occasions with yelling and clapping, and have never come close to having to flee or fight.

    Alex
     
  5. Seasider

    Seasider Paddler

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    Got it. Thanks Bryan.

    And Alex, there is also a very small puffin colony just south of Rugged point. I see them every time I am in that area but only within a km or so of the nest site.
     
  6. Tex

    Tex Paddler

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    Wow. What an absolutely fantastic report. Thank you for sharing! The wolves are something else, and I'm very impressed by your level of bird ID. Super cool.