legal requirements for guided trips in BC

Discussion in 'General Paddling Discussions' started by pryaker, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. pryaker

    pryaker Paddler

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    I'm wondering if anyone can point me to the right resources to find what it takes to be "legal" while guiding a trip in BC. We have friends in France who run a guiding company and want to do tours on the west coast of Van isl. They are fully certified back home in France but would they also have to get BC certification? I've tried googling and found some info but was hoping some of you might have some input.

    Thanks

    Roger
     
  2. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    They might get some info from the sea kayak guide alliance of BC website - skgabc at http://www.skgabc.com/
     
  3. Comoxpaddler

    Comoxpaddler Paddler

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    David Lecovin is a paddler and lawyer. He would no doubt charge for advice but it ought to be good.

    http://www.lecovinlaw.com/
     
  4. RobP

    RobP Paddler

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    If they are going to do it for compensation then they are going to have to get work permits from immigration
     
  5. pryaker

    pryaker Paddler

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    Oh, that's one I didn't even come close to thinking of! But not sure if that applies? For example if a group of landlocked tourists come over with a guide and get bussed around BC would they need a work permit, they aren't doing business here, the business is in their home country? I wonder?

    Mick and comox, thanks also. We'd found the skgabc site and were waiting to see what we heard from here before contacting them. And the law firm you reference seems to be just what they'll need to be sure of everything, is is too much to hope they'll have someone in the office fluent in French? We'll find out.

    A big thanks to all

    R
     
  6. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Roger,

    Sent you a PM.
     
  7. RobP

    RobP Paddler

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    If they are being compensated for guiding then they are working in Canada, doesnt matter where they are paid, it is where the work is performed.
     
  8. Roy222

    Roy222 Paddler

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    When ever I crossed into Canada to visit an assembly plant the first question was always, " why can't a Canadian worker do that job?" or something like that.
    I would guess that there is no shortage of local guides.
    Group leader seems like a better job description. Any local activity ( like hiking or Kayaking) would probably be best served by local guides.

    Roy
     
  9. Kermode

    Kermode Paddler

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    If you are a visitor to Canada you may not work, at all. That even covers (for instance) doing odd jobs, painting, gardening etc for a person you may be staying with (it's classed as working!) How CBSA/ Immigration would police that however is beyond me.
    You are required to state on landing what your purpose is for visiting Canada. Holiday, business etc. To do any work you must have a valid work permit. As said previously, makes no difference where you're paid it's where tha act of working takes place. The objective is to protect Canadian citizens & Canadian jobs.
     
  10. ken_vandeburgt

    ken_vandeburgt Paddler

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    My understanding is that commercial outfitters require a user permit or license of occupation to use crown land for commercial purposes. A park use permit is required in provincial parks.

    You'd have to go to a BC government front counter office. I think its Lands Forests and Resources that looks after crown land. Its BC Parks for Park Use Permits.
     
  11. pryaker

    pryaker Paddler

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    I contacted the attorney recommended above and he also says it would be highly unlikely for a non-Canadian to be allowed to guide a trip or get any of the required permits. What he suggested was working in partnership with a local guide service to provide equipment and expertise. makes sense, the non native would be "group leader" like Roy said and the local guide would show them around. It'll be a fun trip for the guide, these are skilled paddlers looking for adventure not beginners. I'll be passing all the comments on, Thanks again

    Rog
     
  12. Reef

    Reef Paddler

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    Is the trip in question in Desolation Sound?
     
  13. pryaker

    pryaker Paddler

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    Hey Reef, no it's definitely not Desolation Sound. I'm not sure if they have an exact location yet; they're wanting to do something fairly wild like North Brooks or Cape Scott. Their idea is to bring over all their best customers for a cool adventure.
     
  14. KayDubbya

    KayDubbya Paddler

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    Have you ever heard the expression "It's always easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission"? Just a thought...
     
  15. Andy_Ferguson

    Andy_Ferguson Paddler

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    Aside from the legal ramifications, I have to wonder just how knowledgeable a guiding outfit from France would be about the West Coast of the Island?
     
  16. pryaker

    pryaker Paddler

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    KW, I think they have another way of saying it, but I think they are quite aware of that old saying...

    As far as knowledge of the west coast goes, did any of have us have any before we first went there? I know all I had was what I'd read in guide books and I've always been happy that none of them spelled every last detail out, there was always a sense of adventure, that feeling of "who knows what I might find around the next corner". These folks are just looking for a little excitement and adventure in a world class venue, pretty simple really.
     
  17. Reef

    Reef Paddler

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    pryaker, I agree with the essence of your idea, however a guided trip can be very different.
    Personal trips are different than commercial. Assumptions of risk are very different.

    I suggest the solution is easy, hire a certified level 1 guide and enjoy! Compared to all the expenses of flying from France, hiring boats/gear, etc, a guide will be the cheapest of the costs and the best value.

    I would never think that I could land in a country thousands of kms away and run a guided trip of the same quality/safety that I could run here. But on a personal trip, yup I would happily plan a trip on any continent. (having clients makes it different is my point)
     
  18. Andy_Ferguson

    Andy_Ferguson Paddler

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    If you hire a kayaking guide for the West Coast one would hope that they have some idea of "what I might find around the next corner."

    Why not drop the idea of guiding and just come out and enjoy a trip? Far less liability that way.