Looking for a good night's sleep(ing bag)

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by Jurfie, Apr 24, 2008.

  1. Kasey

    Kasey Paddler

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    :lol: :lol: :lol: Sushiy....you almost killed me here! ROFL :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  2. ken_vandeburgt

    ken_vandeburgt Paddler

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    Great idea. I think though that I'll stick with the rule where the sleeping bag doesn't get wet ...
     
  3. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    This has got to be one of the best gear threads ever. Sushiy, you're too funny. :lol:

    But it's an idea that would make good sense if you were in a situation where your sleeping bag (of the synthetic variety) is wet and you have to get through the night -- I suspect that one could get a reasonably good nights sleep despite a wet bag if they were able to keep warm. Brilliant stuff, Sushiy!

    For what it's worth, when I was a kid I was in a tent that got swamped in a downpour -- I ended up in a synthetic bag that was wet from the knees to the feet. I can't recall if I was specifically cold, but I do know that I didn't sleep well at all.

    *****
     
  4. sushiy

    sushiy Paddler

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    Ken, I totally agree that we should pay good attention to keep the bag dry.
    I thought about these for " just in case" for the peace of mind, and willing to experiment with wet bag in my backyard when my cold is gone.

    I 'm pleased with the result of first trial with pad in the moist bag. I have to see what temperature I can take with it.

    My friends,please
    Just remember to read my signature :wink:
     
  5. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Hey, I'm not responsible either. :lol: :wink:

    *****
     
  6. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Only sushi would take on the task of job-testing a wet sleeping bag. You go, girl! I have a friend who chastises me as a "measuring, calibrating fool" for my retentive ways ... now I have met my match. No way am I going to wet my bag and try to sleep in it on the living room floor. :roll: :roll: :wink:
     
  7. ken_vandeburgt

    ken_vandeburgt Paddler

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    Sushiy, the ideas you've put up are really good survival suggestions. If ever I get stuck on a deserted island I'd hope to be stranded with someone as resourceful as you.

    Though I'd hope they wouldn't keep living in the drysuit for weeks at a time.
     
  8. ken_vandeburgt

    ken_vandeburgt Paddler

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    How do manufacturers come up with temperature ratings for sleeping bags?

    The only story I've read on sleeping bag ratings was about a US Marine sleeping bag standard.

    The standard was that the marine's fingertips had to be kept at a certain temperature when the bag was used in extreme conditions. If I recall the fingertips for a marine in a minus 30 bag had to be maintained at about 60 fahrenheit in minus 30 temperatures. That doesn't seem to be comfortable standard, so the bag rating is just meant to be a temperature where the bag will keep a person alive and capable of fighting.
     
  9. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    REI used to have a "thermal man" -- a thermister-equipped copper torso and legs which was used in some way to quantify bag ratings. I've never found much rhyme or reason to ratings ... because of variability amongst manufacturers and among sleepers.

    I think it is a big guessing game.
     
  10. Jurfie

    Jurfie Paddler

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    Thanks for all the replies in this and the tents thread...lots to think about!

    8)
     
  11. sushiy

    sushiy Paddler

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    Alright bros,
    I slept in the wet synthtic bag last night on my back deck ( of my house). I did not tell my husband about it, so he was worried what was wrong with me :lol:

    Bag- REI's Zepher rated +15F dgree,
    condition- lowest at 50F degree, no tent, nothing between my bag and the stars. Sleeping pad in the bag.
    I was wearing- thermal undershirt, fleese ( Polartec 200 jacket and pants), fleece cap.
    Bag was washed and spined in the machine, so it is not dripping wet.

    I am sure it is not as warm as bone dry one, but warm enough so I had to stick my arm out of the bag sometimes.
    And I did not have any chill, I woke up a few times because it was too warm but slept well untill dawn. And the bag is fairy dry in the morning already.

    I am pleased with the result, and happy to see I made the right choice for the bag. "warm even when wet" was the only reason to chose synthetic over dawn for me.

    Happy camping :D
     
  12. oldsailor

    oldsailor Paddler

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    It was gratifying to read Sushiy's test and to have at least some of what we believed about synthetic sleeping bags confirmed.

    Like kayaks, I have collected a plethora of sleeping bags over the past 38 years including several down barrel bags from the 1970s REI era (the "Skier" models) in various weights of down (summer, fall, winter, etc). I have slept on the balcony of a ski hut at Snoqualmie Pass during winter in one of these and stayed comfortable. Actually, more comfortable than if I'd been inside.

    The boat I like to use most is only 21-inches by 16-feet so I have to be able to pack small. For kayak camping I have a synthetic (micro tek) mummy bag rated +5F I bought at Big 5 a couple of years ago that packs down small in its compression sack and is ok to sleep in; a bit warm during summer nights in eastern washington but fine on the coast.

    I have an REI Campbed 3.5 pad because I've discovered that at 65 I no can no longer ignore the rocks. It's fantastic and would be perfect in a Hennessey I think. (My next camping purchase.)

    For base camping (where you can move stuff in via car or boat) I have a wonderful rectangular synthetic bag with a flannel inside that is incredibly comfy. I think that a lighter weight bag for the kayak PLUS a flannel liner is the perfect solution as long as the liner doesn't wrap itself around you in the night.

    On the mutha-ship it will be the flannel rectangular bag for sure.

    The trick to a mummy bag is to not turn over in it but turn over *with* it. You wear it like a big coat. Once you learn to do that sleeping in a mummy bag becomes much less ocnfining.

    That said, there is nothing warmer than goose down as long as it's dry. Nothing lighter either. Nothing packs as compact. Nothing warms you up as fast when you first get into it. Nothing has the temperature range capabilities (keepng you comfortable when it's cold and also when it's warmer). If you can keep it absolutely dry, then a goose down bag can't be beat.

    Craig
     
  13. chodups

    chodups Paddler

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    Setsuko,

    Why am I not surprised that you really did try this?
    OK, you've done your part for research. Now who out there is willing to try the same thing with a wet down bag?
    What? No takers? Not me. I'm strictly a synthetic bag kayak camper and proud of it.

    Jon
     
  14. SheilaP

    SheilaP Paddler

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    WOW Sushi - you are amazing! Thanks for sharing that info.

    I slept in a very damp synthetic bag with wet splotches on it in Port Renfrew this spring. Our tent was leaking through the floor and made a puddle. I was warm enough through the night. The next day we got about half an hour of wind without rain and I hung my bag over a line. It was dry for the next night. (Yes, we moved the tent out of the hole! LMAO! :lol: )

    I use a minus ten barrel bag, no idea who makes the thing.
     
  15. cms82

    cms82 Paddler

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    Agreed oldsailor. IMHO down will always be the best in terms of warmth, lightness and packability but some of the new synthetics are getting pretty close. Mountain Hardwear has a bag called the Lamina 20 (-6C rated) which has ThermicMicro insulation that is as close to down in terms of feel, packability and lightness as I have ever seen. I do about as much backpacking as I do kayaking and, although I prefer my down bag for backcountry adventures, I prefer synthetic bags for kayaking, particularly for the "warm when wet" argument. Paddling should be about enjoying the scenery, not stressing about whether or not your bag will be dry at the end of the day.
     
  16. reallife

    reallife Paddler

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    New summer bag

    I just special-ordered a new summer weight down bag from Feathered Friends. A black, Osprey bag, rated to 30 degrees F, with 4 extra ounces of down fill, made to order in the eVent fabric. The bag should weigh in at 32 ounces plus the stuff bag. Cost $419 plus shipping and tax.

    Feathered Friends b/c they are quite simply the best down bags available. My first FF bag started to delaminate when it was 16-18 years old. I called them up to see about what it would cost to get it repaired and they sent me a brand new replacement for FREE. That bag had been lived in. I would guess I slept in it over a thousand nights. It had been hand washed at least four or five times. What other company would back up their gear to that extent?

    Why black fabric? Black b/c it will dry out faster on a sunny day. I have never had a problem with wet down despite many nights of backpacking and canoeing in downpours and sustained drizzle conditions. Down does get a bit damp from my own humidity and condensation but it will still loft up fine. Never let it get directly wet. Just keep it in a good drysack. I now use the Sea to Summit eVent compression sacks for my sleeping bags.

    30 degree bag b/c my 20 degree bag is a bit too warm.

    Why a new bag if I love my old FF bag so much? Well, this summer I'm going into Alaskan brown bear country and want to avoid any old food smells.

    Why not an off-the shelf bag? eVent fabric b/c it is more waterproof than traditional Goretex and more durable as well.

    Why extra fill? Extra 4 ounces of fill will make up for fill loft losses after multiple washes anticipated.

    My 20 degree bag packs into about 6 x 6 x 8 inches so I expect the new bag to be a bit smaller.
     
  17. oldsailor

    oldsailor Paddler

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    Re: New summer bag

    The shop fire also consumed my kayaking mummy bag (synthetic) plus my sleeping pad and all the tents (plus two down bags from REI we bought 30 years ago). So now, insurance or not, I'm going to have to replace some gear.

    As much as I liked the synthetic mummy I'm going to move to a down mummy because they are just so much better as long as they are kept dry. The Mariner II I just got has front and rear watertight compartments and so I can feel better about keeping a down bag absolutely dry (in a drybag too). But since I don't really kayak camp that often I'm going for a Campmor special and getting a North Face 30F down mummy for about $159.

    The temperature rating was selected in recognition that I'm never going to sleep in the snow again. But I will also carry a liner for fall and spring camping.

    For a sleeping pad I had purchased an REI 3.5 inch version but it was way too big to stow. Campmor has a good deal on a Big Agnes long mummy-shaped 2.5-inch air core pad for $65 that should do the trick. It's been well-received. This pad deflates and folds to "about the size of a Nalgene bottle". That'll work!!!

    Now I have to find a tent. And maybe a Hennesy too.

    Craig