Multitool that won't rust in PFD pocket??

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by JohnAbercrombie, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    A number of years ago, when I was just getting started in kayaking, I was in a class when one of the other students discovered a jammed skeg problem at the launch. The instructor pulled a multitool out of his PFD, flipped it open to reveal needlenose pliers and removed the offending pebble.
    I thought: "I want to do that!".
    Several multitools and a lot of $$ later, I don't think it's going to happen for me!
    mini-DSCN2913.JPG
    Before anybody suggests it, I will state that I'm not going to get the tool out and soak it in fresh water (after opening out the many implements within) after every paddle. Every season, maybe...

    This (Leatherman 'Stainless' (sic)) tool has been completely disassembled and cleaned a couple of times already. It's not just appearance- the pliers are rusted shut.

    Any hints or recommendations will be appreciated!
     
  2. Pascal

    Pascal Paddler

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    John:
    If you don't rinse with freshwater after every paddle, then keep the tool inside a couple of strong zip-bags? Doesn't make the thing much bulkier once rolled up. Problem is the tether line if you insist on keeping it.
    The only SS object I have on my PFD is my knife and even with a shower of all the gear everytime I get back, it still gets rusty spots here and there, easily managed with WD40 and smooth sand paper though. My Pelikan tool box (plier, wire cutter, screwdrivers, etc.) stay inside the boat. I don't use multitools.
     
  3. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    I think you are out of luck, John. Of the various kinds of stainless I know of, even the better grades demand good exposure to well oxygenated water to maintain the veneer of chromium (III) oxide which protects the underlying iron atoms. When the tool is closed, some of the surfaces are deprived of oxygen, causing the protective layer to degrade, and the iron reacts with water, ultimately forming rust, aka iron (III) oxide.

    My memory on this is sketchy, so I may have some details wrong. Someone else with more knowledge might be able to flesh this out. I know that stainless steels also can lose their corrosion resistance if improperly tempered.
     
  4. drahcir

    drahcir Paddler

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    Do titanium multitools exist? My titanium knife does well. It's not just titanium coated.
     
  5. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Well, delve into the details ... part of this one is titanium. Best I could find.
    https://www.leatherman.com/charge-tti-7.html
     
    JohnAbercrombie likes this.
  6. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    That's what sprang into my mind when I checked the titanium knife on my PFD just a few hours ago...similarly neglected and not a spot on it. Still looks new.
     
  7. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    :) I don't care if the handles rust...and it seems that's the main place for Ti in that tool. And the price..ouch!
    But thank you for looking for me!
    Maybe I'd be better off with a small Pelican box with some regular tools in it, like Pascal uses.
     
  8. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    John, that's basically what I do. A small roll up piece of fleece, sewn to hold a collection of tools I know will fit about every fastener I have on my boats. Because, I find a multitool has everything I need, but sometimes I want two of the parts on opposite ends of something I am screwing on/up!

    It is buried at the bottom of my small inside the cockpit drybag. When I need those tools, the repair demands land. On the other hand, the "lunch knife," a circa 1978 Swiss Army knife, rides in a ziploc with the cheese, the salami, the bagel, and all its other edible friends, with a small lanyard on it for times when I might lose it forever.

    The lunch knife has a cousin, "the dinner knife," somewhat more elaborate with a slightly different selection of goodies, which is in the cook kit/stove bag, loaded last into the aft hatch. While the lunch knife needs some Corrosion Block love every other trip in its arthritic joints, the dinner knife only gets a loving lube job once a season, if that.

    I love tools. :) ;)
     
  9. Peter-CKM

    Peter-CKM Paddler

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    If having access to something to clear skegs (the original use talked about in first post) is all that is needed on the water, a dive knife or similar attached to a PFD would work. Even a flat head screwdriver could do fine. I have an old, rusty dive knife attached to my PFD (inside pocket, under front zipper, on my Kokatat MsFit), and that does fine for clearing skegs, popping out stuck buttons on Werner paddles, or cutting fishing lie from birds (the main uses I have for it). Only use I might like it to do, but can't any more, is spreading peanut butter.

    I keep the mutli-tool and other parts like that in a dry bag, and that dry bag goes in day hatch. I can't recall a time I needed to use the tool on the water. If I did, it would be accessible ion day hatch. But because the call for the tool is so rare, and not urgent, I don't carry things like that on my PFD. Added benefit, they don't corrode as fast.
     
  10. Roy222

    Roy222 Paddler

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    You might try making an aluminum sheath from a beer can. The Aluminum should be sacrificial to both SS and steal. Magnesium would work better but a lot harder to find. It worth a try, as this method has been used on outboard motors .

    Roy
     
  11. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Generally, stainless does not respond well to conventional "sacrificial" anodes. The reason is that the chromium oxide layer on the exposed stainless is destroyed by anodes. That layer protects the underlying iron and other ferrous alloys from corrosion, much in the same way aluminum oxide, either from anodizing or from ordinary weathering, protects underlying aluminum. Stainless requires oxygen exposure to retain that layer of chromic oxide.

    This is a lucid introduction to corrosion of stainless steel: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientists-explain-why-st/
     
  12. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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