Nikon announces new smaller series of camera

Discussion in 'Paddling Photography' started by Dan_Millsip, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    This is (very close to) what I've been waiting for:

    http://en.nikon.ca/Nikon-Products/Produ ... -1-V1.html

    Superior near SLR-image quality, quiet operation, interchangeable lenses, and best of all -- SMALL size.

    This, I can put on the deck of my kayak. :big_thumb

    And Canon has just announced that they will be making "a historic global announcement" on November 3rd. Hopefully this will bring more competition to the mirrorless arena.
     
  2. WaterMark

    WaterMark Paddler

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    Isn't this similar to the Olympus Pen?
     
  3. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Yes, there are similarities but some significant differences -- mainly with the image sensor. I believe image quality will be better with the Nikon sensor.

    Another really big consideration for me is the built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF) - for those of us who need to wear reading glasses the display screen on the back of the camera is a blur without glasses, the EVF takes care of this problem.

    My guess is that we're going to see this category of camera grow quite large with lots of lens selection now that the big players are jumping in.
     
  4. Tootsall

    Tootsall Paddler

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    This does look like a nice package, especially for the person who has a number of different types of camera to pick from depending upon the anticipated need of the day.

    The drawback that I see is with this style that one still will have to carry a number of lenses, depending upon the ranges they anticipate shooting at. I remember an overseas trip a number of years ago lugging a box full of (35mm) Minolta SLR and a couple of lenses, a 2X adaptor and a tripod: comparing that with a later trip having just an extended-zoom Kodak (that "almost" fit in a pocket...and I wish it would have had image stabilization) and there is no comparison (for me). The other issue for the new Nikon would be the "relatively" limited optical zoom range.

    Currently we are planning an overseas trip where I will need a lot of zoom (Africa) but the travel arrangements are such that we will have to be very light on the luggage (several flights in small aircraft). Although I'd love the unarguably higher picture quality of an SLR (especially for a "trip of the lifetime"), I'm reluctant to add to the load with anything that might require various "bits and pieces" to get the different ranges I anticipate or that would involve the inevitable "hope they stay still while I change to the right lense" issue. The jury is still out but "current thinking" has me strongly considering moving up to the Panasonic DMC-FZ100 after several years with an FZ28. There's just something about an optical zoom equivalent to a 25 - 600 mm lense that you can still carry easily and that shoots high quality video in a single unit package. (Now if it were waterproof as well....woo hooo!)
     
  5. WaterMark

    WaterMark Paddler

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    I like the idea of the EVF. I'd rather use a view finder than a screen.
     
  6. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    WaterMark -- the lack of an EVF was what turned me off of all the prior offerings.

    Having to carry and change lenses is not much of an issue for me. I'd have the 30-110 mm (81-297mm equivalent) kit lens on the camera almost all of the time on the water. If I see something that requires a wider view or more zoom, it will be in the distance and I'd generally have enough time to make a lens change. The 30-110 would suffice fine for probably 98% of the shots that I take from the water (the wide-angle pancake lens would be great for forest shots under shadowy tree canopy when off the water). If it's a bit lumpy and I can't make a lens change, I would make the most of the lens that's on the camera at the time and take the shot.

    These cameras are quite a bit smaller than dSLR cameras -- the lenses are smaller too.

    Bear in mind here that what I'm about to say is not to diminish or detract from ultra-zoom cameras -- I've used a few ultra-zoom cameras and totally get what you're saying about their utility (I currently have a Canon SX20 IS) -- one ultra-zoom lens that does it all is definitely handy and allows for some great image capture moments, however, you do pay a price for the convenience -- you pay for it in image quality. The image quality for the web and for viewing on a monitor is quite sufficient and spectacular results can be had. The vast majority of the images in our Wallpaper section were taken by Mark Schilling and myself with ultra-zoom point and shoot cameras. I've had quite a few images published in magazines and it's really disappointing to see an image that was well composed not be able be used on a cover or full page because the image quality just isn't good enough to print that size. Because I want to use my photos in a commercial printing environment, my needs are a bit more demanding than that of most people.

    Part of the point and shoot quality is lost with the sensor. The image sensor on a point and shoot camera is very small -- about the size of a fingernail. It is just not capable of capturing as much image data as the much larger sensor of a 4:3 or SLR sensor. More data means crisper images with better colour, and much better performance in low light situations. The Nikon 1 v1 sensor is slightly smaller than a 4:3 sensor.

    The following image shows approximate full size images of typical sensor size in Point and Shoot, 4:3, and SLR.



    As you can see, there's a huge difference in the size of the sensors (and the amount of image data that they can collect).

    The other part of the quality equation is lenses. One lens that is expected to perform well in all aspects of the zoom spectrum and in a vast variety of lighting conditions is a lot to ask for. Couple that with a fairly small diameter of glass to work with and you're really limited in what can be accomplished (but current results are quite amazing imho). Larger glass size and the ability to have specific glass designed for specific purposes can greatly improve the quality of the image and the capability of the camera.

    Another plus for me with these cameras is their overall size. Even with long lenses attached they are quite small -- small enough that I can carry it in a reasonably small-sized waterproof box on my deck without it hindering my ability to paddle in any way -- this is something that I don't think is possible to accomplish with a full-sized dSLR camera.

    Not sure if the Nikon is for me but it's got a lot of nice features -- looking forward to Canon's announcement on Nov 3.

    Big sensor in a compact package. My kind of camera. :big_thumb
     

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  7. Tootsall

    Tootsall Paddler

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    Yes, and that is precisely the conundrum I'm going to have to work through. I acknowledge that quality and size of the glass is important: no matter the size of the sensor, if the image put on it is crappy the picture is going to be crappy. That's why I went with the larger body and lense of the DMC FZ series and of course Panasonic uses Leica lenses so quality isn't an issue. Really it comes down to the tradeoff between utility vs reaching for the "ultimate" (ok... maybe not "ultimate" but I'm sure you know what I mean) of quality of image captured.

    I agree that the Canon announcement will be interesting: they produce good product too and if their new camera has the larger sensor and they come up with a really good zoom lense that runs into the +/- 600mm range I could be swayed. For my anticipated future needs though, any lower zoom just isn't going to cut it and we all know what a good DSLR with a 600 mm tele is going to cost (and weigh!)

    Having said all that, Dan... no matter what camera you use, you take superb photos and I really enjoy looking at them. Thanks for sharing.

    Ed
     
  8. Byron

    Byron Paddler

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    Big relative to a P&S sensor which is tiny, but small relative to everything else.

    Your diagram doesn't show the new Nikon sensor, if it did one would see the Nikon sensor is about half the size of the 4:3 sensor. And about one third the size of a typical consumer DSLR. In fact a "full frame" DSLR is almost 8 times bigger and that used to be considered "small" not to long ago! That's the rub, it's actually a very small sensor.

    But other than sensor, the announcement showcased some cool technology. It will be interesting to see what Canon announces.
     
  9. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Yes, quite true it is smaller than the 4:3 sensor (as I mentioned in my post). The sensor is not all that big, but it is bigger than a point and shoot.

    Agreed -- some really cool technology. I'm looking forward as well to what Canon replies with -- hopefully it will spec out with a larger sensor (and I'm a huge fan of the Canon interface).
     
  10. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    :oops:

    Aside from the smallish sensor, the 1 V1 has some pretty cool features and specs.
     
  11. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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