pvc cart

tim_in_bc

Paddler
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
Messages
46
Location
Victoria bc
Great looking WEB site, hopefully it will be successful. Seems to be a strong lack of communications between West Coast Paddlers.

I was looking at the PVC cart and was wondering where the pins to hold the unit together can be found.
 

Mark_Schilling

Paddler
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
4,552
Location
"Home by the Sea" - Nanaimo, BC
After a lot of searching in the Victoria area, I finally found some at Acklands-Grainger. Here is a link to their web site; click on "Branch Locator" at the top to find locations.

My cart is significantly different than the one shown (smaller and can easily be stowed in my 9.5" round hatches) but the pins are essentially the same, just smaller.
 

Dan_Millsip

Paddler
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
9,297
Location
Beautiful BC
tim_in_bc said:
I was looking at the PVC cart and was wondering where the pins to hold the unit together can be found.
Tim, I found the pins at Princess Auto in Langley (they were about a buck apiece). You can likely find them at most automotive supply stores or at industrial supply stores (such as Acklands, as Mark mentions). I'm not certain of the actual name of them but I called them "D-pins" and the sales clerk knew what I was asking for. I also purchased the pneumatic tire wheels at Princess Auto (for $10 each).

I'll be updating the cart album (as soon as I have time) with some more specifics (measurements, etc). I should mention that a wooden 'plug' was inserted in the pvc "T" joint to increase stability of the axle (which were stainless steel threaded stock). We were fortunate to have the use of a wood turning lathe and turned the plug to fit snugly inside before drilling a hole for the axle. Some sort of plug to reinforce the axle is probably a good idea.

For the yellow foam, we used an inexpensive pool noodle -- the inside diameter of the hole needed to be increased to fit the PVC pipe -- to increase the hole, I took a 36" piece of PVC and tapered one end on a grinder (about a 45 degree taper), then put the PVC pipe in a vise. I then inserted a dowel through the pipe to use as a guide for keeping the noodle centred while using a twisting motion to push the noodle. Once the noodle was centred over the tapered end of the PVC pipe, the dowel kept the noodle centred for the entire cut (see the diagram below) -- this worked very well and produced a consistent wall thickness in the foam. Don't use glue on the plugs that hold the noodle on the pipe -- you may need to replace the foam later -- a friction fit of the plug seems to work fine (haven't had one fall off yet).



*****
 

tim_in_bc

Paddler
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
Messages
46
Location
Victoria bc
fantastic!

Thanks for the details. Looks like you have taken all the confusion out of the picture.

This solution seems as good as any you can buy.
 
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