Pygmy Borealis XL Build

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by Whidbey, Feb 13, 2010.

  1. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    The tape is insurance against an inadequate bond between the thin bulkhead and the hull. After tacking the bulkhead in place with a few dabs of thickened resin (and cure), I usually do these as one process, finishing the bulkhead/hull attachment with a good fillet of thickened epoxy, and then applying the tape while the resin is very wet. The tape gets some wetout from underneath, and I dab on more resin as needed to complete it.

    I don't know that the tape is essential, but I really want the bulkheads to remain attached. There is some hull flex in use, especially in surf, and strong bulkheads reduce that.
     
  2. Steve Deligan

    Steve Deligan Paddler

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    I ended up installing strips of tape... "tabs" if you will... on the cockpit side of the bow bulkhead and on the aft side of the stern bulkhead. Both where they won't be noticed tooooo much. I'm convinced that they will hold more than sufficiently. I don't do surf and the hull will never be subjected to any pressures that would break the bulkheads. Pygmy even says that you really only need to tape one side.

    Today I did the upper coaming strips. Tomorrow I'll route the inside edges. Lots of pictures on my blog at http://pygmykayakbuildblog.blogspot.com/.

    Thanks,

    Steve
     
  3. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Agree. Tape on one side is ample.
     
  4. Steve Deligan

    Steve Deligan Paddler

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    Rounded over the cockpit coaming today. Looks good so far. I'm going to try something different on this boat and paint the coaming. First I'll use epoxy filler for a few coats and sand that super smooth, and then I'll spray on epoxy paint. A few coats of varnish later will protect it from UV. Should look good... I hope!




    As always, more pictures on my blog at http://pygmykayakbuildblog.blogspot.com/.

    Thanks,

    Steve
     
  5. Mac50L

    Mac50L Paddler

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    As always there are different ways of doing things, not necessarily better but different.

    We build our cockpit rims roughly, stacking the bits of ply such that they are wider than needed and built on/clamped to, the hull but not glued to it. Once built up enough they are taken off and finished "on the bench", cut back to the correct width, rim fitted and any glass reinforcing added. They are then fitted and glued to the hull.

    Doing it this way uses waste plywood as there are no long bits with the resulting wastage.

    The alternative method is a former to the shape of the hole. Vertical short bits of timber/plywood, much wider than the height of the finished rim, with grain angled off vertical, alternatively, are fitted round the former, basically making up a plywood ring. The "ring" is put on the deck and a pencil run round to mark. The mark is touching the bottom edge of the ring where the gap is greatest and that height up where the ring touches the deck. This is cut and a similar cut about 20 mm up. We now have a ring which then has the rim fitted to it and then all glued to the kayak.
     
  6. Steve Deligan

    Steve Deligan Paddler

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    Here is my deck rigging plan. I drew it onto pictures of the Borealis so I would make sure that it would work out. The idea is to have a continuous perimeter line of shock cording running the entire boat and also make up the "X" patterns. I want two "X"'s forward of the cockpit and one aft. I also didn't want to have any single section have a doubled-up line. This plan seems to work. It uses two sections of line. To make it easier to figure out I used two colors; one for each line. On the actual boat they will both be red shock cord.

    Anyone see any issues?



    Thanks,

    Steve
     
  7. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    You don't want to use shock cord (bungee cord) for perimeter lines as the stretch can be detrimental to rescue situations. Bungee cord is fine for deck lines in front of and behind your cockpit so that you can store stuff underneath but you want non-stretching cord for your perimeter lines.
     
  8. Steve Deligan

    Steve Deligan Paddler

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    My thinking is that 1) 99% of all Pygmy kayaks don't have any perimeter lines whatsoever, so this is better than nothing, 2) it's a clean look, 3) it enables me to have retractable toggles that don't flop over the side, and 4) I can use any portion of it as a paddle keeper. The people I paddle with like them because they can grab my boat and yet have a bit of flex so that our boats don't constantly bash into each other on a raft-up.

    Most of the professional perimeter lines I've seen are rarely very taut. Most have stretched out quite a bit and no longer afford the advantage they used to. In order to flip a partner's boat you usually can't rely on just their perimeter lines as such.

    You are correct, my lines are not as proper as non-stretch line, but I'd say that they're better than nothing.
     
  9. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    But now you're learning better - from one or two here. Take a minute or so to re-ponder the situation. There may be or must be other ways to achieve what you desire and still perform the function.

    Now that is not a great idea as shock cord will stretch to 2x its length [or so] - so one could grab the cord and get huge stretch if it's continuous. If you must go this route [we're trying to convince you not to but], fix the cord at each fitting in some manner.

    You can get black perimeter non stretch line that is a sim diameter to bungee. Maybe be clever with the fittings so that one appears to meld into the other.

    edit to add: your line layout looks simple, so what about separate perim lines going thru the same fittings as the X bungees. Nobody'll know that they're 2 separate systems by appearance alone.
     
  10. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    And then again you might be creating a hazard that wouldn't otherwise be there.

    Here's a link to a previous discussion about perimeter lines with some photos of how I did mine on my Coho:

    viewtopic.php?f=7&t=3775
     
  11. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Steve,

    I'll add my endorsement of the value of perimeter lines of polyester line, not shock cord. Same rationale as others have mentioned. Pygmy sells perimeter line which is a good match for their shock cord, if I recall. Their shock cord seems better made than other types I have used, as some is more easily degraded by UV.

    FWIW, most folks find that the cross deck shock cord needs to be stepped up in diameter from what Pygmy provides in their kits, if it is to be fully functional in securing a paddle blade for the paddle float outrigger self rescue technique. Otherwise, the blade can slip out, embarrasing and possibly a threat during self rescue. This is easily substituted in after you have done some practice self rescues in rough conditions, if you want to use same diameter stuff for now.
     
  12. Mac50L

    Mac50L Paddler

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    Non-stretch decklines are like safety belts in cars. A little slackness is good for getting an arm under the line on each side if you are the rescuer, to grip if being the rescued.

    Any rescue descriptions showing holding the cockpit rim are done by those who have not had to do it for real and in cold conditions. Go out in a do-it-right or someone dies situation. Do the rescue with the rescued in the water for less than 30 seconds with waves, wind and cold <10C water.
     
  13. Roy222

    Roy222 Paddler

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    Steve,
    I am going to chime in on your bungee cord perimeter lines. The layout is very clever, but that layout doubles their overall length and makes them twice as unsafe.
    That layout would probably make non stretch perimeter lines non functional as well.
    I used bungee cord forward and aft of my hatches and it proved to be a big mistake. I can't use the perimeter lines to help load my boat. Just when I need a handle to grab, it is not there.
    Because your boat has a hard edge between deck and sides you might consider adding a friction modifier to the edge. Maybe a high friction paint that is sometimes use on boat decks. That way you could use your line layout and still add an extra safety factor.

    Your craftsmanship is spectacular!


    Roy
     
  14. drahcir

    drahcir Paddler

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    Keeping perimeter lines taut is routine maintenance. I also string wooden beads on my perimeter lines to make them easy to grab, even if quite taut.
     
  15. Whidbey

    Whidbey Paddler

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    Professional perimeter lines are usually slack because they see use through assisted and self rescue practice. Particularly in Pygmy boats a little slack is to be desired so that it's easier to grab a line with a gloved hand where the line passes between the hatch strap eyelets.