recommended kayak cart

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by eriktheviking, Apr 15, 2010.

  1. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    Can anyone recommend a commercial kayak cart? Mainly I would use it for portages (i.e. a loaded boat on trails) so it needs to be pretty sturdy. There seems to be a lot of comment about the inadequacies of most commercial carts for this purpose, but surely there is something out there that is reliable. I am hoping to have one that can be broken down and stowed, so the bicycle wheel variety is too big

    Has anyone tried the C-TUG? I am wondering how it compares to the other more common types (aluminum framed).
     
  2. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    I will probably buy a C-TUG this weekend, I was wondering about others comments on it too?
     
  3. SheilaP

    SheilaP Paddler

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    I plan on buying a C-Tug too! The appeal is being able to stuff it into a hatch without tools! :big_thumb
     
  4. kayakwriter

    kayakwriter Paddler

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    I've owned or used several carts over 20 years, including the C-TUG. Of these, the best by far is the Paddleboy Heavy Lifter, which I've been using for several years. It's taken my loaded boat over the portages at Bowron Lakes twice, in addition to lots of other use. It's stainless steel, and has proper bearings and solid axles.
    If you're coming to the get-together this weekend, I'll have it with me so you could check it out.
     
  5. keabird

    keabird Paddler

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    I have the C-Tug and I have been extremely pleased with it. It is tough and easy to break down. I lost the little kickstand piece and just use a paddle half to prop it up. I also use an extra strap looped through the holes in the saddle to augment the built in strap, which is hard to get really tight.
     
  6. lomcevak

    lomcevak Paddler

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    Kayakwriter, is the stainless steel construction and bearing wheels the selling point for you? I checked the few reviews there are on Paddling.net regarding both and the C-TUG seemed to get higher reviews. The Paddleboy doesn't appear to be able to fit inside the hatch, does it? Or more directly asked, doesn't the C-Tug collapse down to be more compact?

    The C-Tug website was indicating a mass of 5.5kg! Can that be correct? Their website tries to show it as a seat, too. Has anyone tried it as such? I think of the two it would get my vote. How much is it?
     
  7. rider

    rider Paddler

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  8. lomcevak

    lomcevak Paddler

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    Agreed, I've worked on a design that was more compact, but failed under weight! Oops. Still haven't found the perfect solutions. I was looking at one on here that was a bunch of rigging under tension. I liked the idea, but couldn't quite decipher the schematics of it.
     
  9. kayakwriter

    kayakwriter Paddler

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    Yes, it was the stainless steel and true bearings that sold me. Some of the lighter aluminum carts simply have a bare axle turning inside the wheel - I've had either the wheel or the axle material start to be lathed off when pulling a loaded kayak. Okay for short runs near civilization, but not for remote portages like the Bowron Lakes.

    No, the Paddleboy won't fit through small front hatches, though it will fit through the large rear hatch on my Northwest Kayaks Discovery. If you're on a longer trip, where you won't want your wheels for a week or two, you can dissassemble it even further to make less awkward shapes for packing by de-mounting the wheels from the tubing they're attached to. You'll need a couple of wrenches (which I carry anyway as part of my repair kit.) And you'll need to carefully note the order of the various spacers, washers, frame, and nuts for re-assembly. A good way to do that is to snap some pictures with your digital camera.
     
  10. greg0rn

    greg0rn Paddler

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    Heavy lifter for me, too. I like its rigid construction and bearings. Its weight at 4.5 kg is ok, but that can be reduced by removing kickstand. I'm planning to replace its 10.5" wheels with something bigger, let say 14" from Northern.
     

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  11. dvfrggr

    dvfrggr Paddler

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  12. lomcevak

    lomcevak Paddler

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    That one looks really nice! (I think!) I say 'I think' because the picture is SO small. I looked and could not find any other info on it, except that they want $120. I wish I could find out more about it, what it is constructed of, how it collapses, etc.

    Tootsall PM'd me and is helping me with information to build the one I referenced earlier in this thread. I'll make a detailed report when complete!
     
  13. dvfrggr

    dvfrggr Paddler

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    lomcevak, Just remove the cotter pin's, remove the wheel's, loosen the bolt's that secure the frames to the axel and the whole shabang will pass thru a 10'' hatch on a NDK Explorer. Pretty solid aluminum and durable product, I've stored my kayak's on this cart for the last 7 years 24/7. I live a block from the water and it's a easy ride down the street but a little bit of a pull as I make my way thru the sand to the water.

    Dave R
     

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  14. camshaft

    camshaft Paddler

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  15. camshaft

    camshaft Paddler

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  16. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    I bought the C-tug at Paddlefest and used it a few times but only over even ground, no curbs, root-balls, or rocks. It works really nice and breaks down easy with nothing to lose. Fits in the Pygmy and the Ocean Kayak Prowler 13.
     
  17. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Camshaft, we used the Wheeleez cart from MEC on the bowrons and had no issues with it at all. It worked very well with a loaded single kayak.

    *****
     
  18. camshaft

    camshaft Paddler

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    thanks dan

    Looks ok for a 100.00 bucks..
    Would be nice to build one from pcv pipe, but would suck if it broke along the trip

     
  19. camshaft

    camshaft Paddler

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    Well my experience with the Wheeleez Tuff Tire Canoe/Kayak Cart isn't great. It showing excessive wear on the wheels and alum frame. And I didn't like the foam bumpers because they didn't hold the kayak in place. Unless you over tightened the straps which in turn caused pressure points on the hull with the 4 bumpers.
    Just my .02


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  20. Rrdstarr

    Rrdstarr Paddler

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    Looks like the cart was overweight AND sand was in the bearing area of the wheel.