Rescue Stirrup

Discussion in 'Gear Talk' started by AndreG, Oct 6, 2010.

  1. AndreG

    AndreG Paddler

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  2. MartinZ

    MartinZ Paddler

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    $18??? :roll:

    Purchase 10 feet of 1 inch flat web for about $3. Slings are nice, especially when assisting others. If you are having trouble re-entering your boat certainly consider one and practice with it.
     
  3. blondie

    blondie Paddler

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    I have practised using it in classes as an aid to an assisted recovery. It is very useful for people who lack the upper body strength to scramble up and onto the deck of their boat, or people who have become fatigued for any reason. Essentially, it acts as a step up into the boat. It is quite simple to use in assisted recoveries with the rescuer stabilizing the boat. I suspect that for a solo recovery you would want to use it in combination with a paddlefoat outrigger, but I have not tried this. I have meant for some time to pick up some webbing and make my own, as it would be useful to have since I do bring newbies out paddling.
     
  4. AndreG

    AndreG Paddler

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    Thanks Martin. I was thinking about making one. And going from 18$ to 3$ or maybe 4$ if you add the buckle, for the same tool, is a no brainer.

    Thanks for the info Blondie. Reasuring to read of someone that has actually used it. As for the self rescue part, will have to wait till next summer. That's when we go for the course with self rescue. But I did see how it is supposed to be used in drawings, on the company sight. Seems easy enough.

    Andre
     
  5. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    This is OK in principle but reminds me about when we used to make our own ladder slings for aid climbing (used to be a rock climber). It was possible to make something cheap and crudely functional but they never worked as well as the commercial ones, mostly because we did not work at refining our design (and my still limited sewing abilities).

    I have used the Northwater sling while practicing and it works fine for me. I suspect most home-made designs would end up being a lot more cumbersome and therefore more prone to being left behind and hence useless. The commercial units at least fold up to be pretty compact and I have mine clipped under the front bungees, out of the way until needed. I keep it with me because I do a lot of solo paddling and my fear is getting too cold in a northern lake to be able to self rescue reliably when slightly hypothermic. Not the sort of thing that I want to test extensively (i.e. self rescue when hypothermic), so I have only trained in not too cold conditions so far, both with and without the sling assist. The down side of the sling is the additional time in the water to get it rigged up, so whether one chooses to use it would be a critical decision at the time of rescue, again a reason to practice with and without it.
     
  6. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Consider threading a cheap styrofoam float onto it, and snapping a spare carabiner as well. The float makes it easy to locate the sling in a thrash, and the 'biner makes sure the low point is defined and as low as it can be, making it easier to get a foot into it. I keep mine in an E-bag snapped via short lanyard into the deck bungies behind the cockpit, so it it ready to go in a flash, and not snarled about the deck. The E-bag contains a few other necessaries that I might need in a rescue, and one or two minor items I would not mind losing in the heat of a re-entry.
     
  7. MartinZ

    MartinZ Paddler

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    Like commercial climbing aiders, sewing on a bunch of stuff to a rescue sling will leave you with more potential failure points (also used to be a climber :cool ). That said, I think the adjustment buckle would be pretty nifty. Doing it all with knots, though, really does work well and gives you the option of using the webbing for other things like as a carry strap for rock beach landings.
     
  8. AndreG

    AndreG Paddler

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    Haven't seen the North Water stirrup from up close.

    I doubt I will be trying to sow the flat web. Would more likely see if I could fine a good buckle. Strong enough to withstand the pressure from atleast 250 pounder and rust resistant.

    Also I don't see how a homemade design would be more cumbersome. The flat webbing set in a small deckbag or folded as shown on MEC' web site should not be anymore cumbersome than the industry made one.

    I will experiment and see what I comeup with, before the new season starts. Will have a buckle and most likely the float and carabiner.

    Thanks everyone

    Andre
     
  9. MartinZ

    MartinZ Paddler

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    At the risk of inadvertently re-starting the deck stowage debate, an easy way to stow the sling is to fold it once and then again. Take the bite (loop) and use it to girth hitch the sling onto an athwartships deckline.
     
  10. kate

    kate Paddler

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    I am a stirrup user, all the time as i have mentioned in another post. I find it very easy and extremely fast to get in with one. I prefer to use a piece of moderate weight floating yellow rope, basically the same stuff as ecomarine sells for their stirrup/ sling. It is knotted and kept permanently attached to a front bungie with one of those large plastice clips, i don't even take it off the bungie when using it ( ie the bungie stretches when the rope is around the coming). The flat webbing I find OK but more difficult, and it doesn't float. Just go to a marine store and buy the rope. then practice with a few lengths to see what works best for you. I have the rope knotted for me but have a longer rope than i need so others can use it. ( i am very short).

    I am sure the webbing is neater and tidier, i just like the bulkier rope when getting in the boat. and it is cheaper... i can go measure my slings length if you want ?
     
  11. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Ropes, lines, slings, they all work. I favor 1-inch webbing for the greater surface area it provides, at about the same bulk as half-inch line. Overhand bends tie up nicely in one-inch web, set well, and are easy to teach to those not knotty.