shortening a paddle

Discussion in 'General Paddling Discussions' started by Longwing, Sep 28, 2015.

  1. Longwing

    Longwing Paddler

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    anybody ever shortened a carbon fiber paddle?
     
  2. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    no, but if you can get an adjustable ferrule, you could use that for shortening. I used one for shortening an old wood paddle.
    Otherwise you could just cut the centre to length, chamfer the ends, and wrap a splice around the outside and/or plug on the inside. Main issue would be a good clamping system to keep alignment.
     
  3. tiagosantos

    tiagosantos Paddler

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    I've shortened a wood paddle using these: http://www.duckworksbbs.com/hardware/mi ... /index.htm

    With carbon.. Well, that's on my to-do list. I have an old 1-pc paddle I want to convert to a 2-pc for a spare. The ferrule will work, but you need a splice between the carbon (or fiberglass, whatever..) shaft and the ferrule. I haven't been able to find the appropriate diameter tubing to serve as a splice.. And it doesn't look like it'll be particularly cheap. Here's some similar stuff - https://dragonplate.com/ecart/categories.asp?cID=80

    I have a feeling I'll end up machining a piece of aluminum to fit inside the shaft. Not as strong/light as carbon, but it'll probably work for a spare...

    edit - these guys might have something that fits, look for the inner ferrule section: http://www.carbonfibertubeshop.com/medium%20tubing.html
     
  4. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    No. Although I paid Werner to shorten an older epoxy/glass paddle. Cost 40 bucks, circa 1995. This was a two piece paddle with one feather angle choice and an un feathered choice, also. If your carbon paddle has an elaborate joint, might be best to have the manufacturer do it.
     
  5. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Yes.
    I shortened a couple of (older, US-made) Lightning paddles- the shafts were carbon or carbon hybrid.
    I cut down the 220 paddles to something in the 210-212 range, IIRC.
    All the 'shortening' was done on one side -the 'female' side of the joint- and the maximum length removed was restricted to the round section of the shaft; the minimum was the amount to cut off the old holes.

    If you have an expensive (Werner or Epic) paddle, I'd second Dave's advice to contact the manufacturer.
     
  6. designer

    designer Paddler

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    I paid Epic to shorten my two piece (so I go from 205 to 215 instead of 210 to 220). An addition benefit is they had improved the locking collar so that was installed too. Well worth it for guaranteed work on something you don't want to fail.
     
  7. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Update:I just contacted Werner about shortening a 2-piece paddle, and got the following reply:
     
  8. JKA

    JKA Paddler

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    Necro post, but yes.

    I had a Lendal modified-crank with Nordkapp N12 blades, two-piece, 220cm.

    It has sat in the shed for years as I use shorter Lendals with smaller, carbon, blades. I decided I wanted to use it for a surf/rock gardening paddle, and a visiting friend promptly amputated the blades with a Swiss Army Knife! I'm not joking, it was traumatic. :shock:

    He took the parts away and cut 5cm off each end of the shaft, which was as much as he could do before getting into the area of shaft that curves. He then cut closed-cell foam and shaped it to fit inside the blades and shaft, running down into the curved area. He laid carbon weave over them using epoxy, making spigots that fitted perfectly. This craftsmanship was beyond me, but having seen it done I'd now give it a crack.

    I then got all the parts back and glued on the blades using West Systems epoxy. Once that had cured I wrapped strands of epoxy-saturated carbon, pulled from the weave, around the join and wrapped that with electrical tape. Several days later I removed the tape, lightly sanded the area, and marvelled at how tidy the join looked. :D

    I then cut 6cm out of the middle of the two-piece shaft, which was just past the hole drilled for the joining pin. This paddle was made before Lendal came out with their Paddle-Lok system.

    The paddle is simply taped together for the moment, while I confirm the feather. When I'm satisfied I'll drill another hole and replace the lock.

    I now have a very strong (stronger than the original as on inspection the blade/shaft join was very lean on glue) paddle that is 204cm, with big blades. It should give me a faster cadence for surf and rock gardening, while being tough enough to withstand the fend-offs that come with the job, at least the way I do it!

    It was pretty scary to have a good paddle chopped up, and the thought of making carbon spigots seemed beyond me, but like most things with kayaks they can be done by the average bush-carpenter.

    Cheers

    John