Skin On Frame For Me!

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by LAM, Dec 28, 2012.

  1. JHA

    JHA New Member

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    Mar 31, 2015
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    Hi Lila. As I am working on my first sof,I've spent a lot of time studying your posts ( thanks so much by the way). You did say it was more "tippy" than you expected. Since I'm going for more stability than speed,I wonder if it would be a good idea to make 5 or 6 feet in the middle of my kayak flat. I would appreciate input from anyone. Thanks again, JHA
     
  2. LAM

    LAM Paddler

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    Dec 28, 2012
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    Hi JHA. I really can't comment with any reliable information on what changing the design of this SOF would do to it, or how you would go about doing that. I just followed direction and instruction when building it. I can only say that I think if you need to change the design then it might not be the kayak you are looking for. You may want to open a new post on this site and ask the many knowledgeable people here what SOF kayak they would recommend that is more stable. What I can say is that the tippy-ness of this kayak is not much of an issue after a few times out in it. Once you learn to be comfortable in it and can relax and move with it you don't feel that it is tippy. It is a fantastic kayak to paddle and responds very well and this is because of the design of the kayak.

    Don't forget to post the pictures of your build on this site.

    Lila
     
  3. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    JHA,

    Tippiness, aka primary stability, is a function of hull shape and how deeply the hull sits in the water. If Lila is a lighter weight person than you are, there is a good chance the boat will be less tippy with you in it if you outweigh her by 30 lbs or more. I own a hardshell which is pretty stable for me, but very tippy when my ex sits in it. I outweigh her by 80 lbs or so. The solution is to ballast the boat with some 40 lbs of water (two 10 Liter MSR Dromedary bags; gallon milk jugs of water, sealed with electrical tape also work fine). Then the boat is OK for her. After a couple brief tests to get the amount of ballast water right, it is important to secure it so it does not shift around.

    Naturally, when loaded for an overnight trip, the extra weight of gear, etc., will also reduce tippiness.

    Caveat, there is a limit to ballasting. Overballasting can lead to insufficient secondary stability, making laying the boat on its edge and sculling very tricky. Takes a lot, unless the boat is already on its designer specified waterline.
     
  4. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    Location:
    staten island, new york
    There is a free program available at blueheronkayaks.com that allows you to design your own kayak, with fairly predictable stability, displacement, and size to fit your personal needs. The learning curve to use it is fairly easy, and while the original intent was to design strip built kayaks, there have been many sof designs made using it, including my own. I've built several of them, and run the gamut from extremely tippy racing kayaks, to veritable barges for fishing (though they were all fairly fast). Worth a try, anyway.
     
  5. JHA

    JHA New Member

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    Mar 31, 2015
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    Thanks guys, I appreciate the feedback.
     
  6. billym

    billym New Member

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    Apr 14, 2015
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    I like your boat and your building skills...well done. :)
     
  7. LAM

    LAM Paddler

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    Thank you billym... I never get tired of hearing that :p I will be taking her out tomorrow to a local lake to practice rolling... my goal tomorrow is to get "the other side"...

    Lila