SOF Build

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by paddlesores, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    Location:
    Maple Ridge, BC
    This weekend I started by fixing the coaming riser. Epoxied the split and clamped it up for a day. I also ended up using epoxy on the coaming overlap. It sounded like it was going to get a little awkward bending the flange around the coaming (the coaming itself was used as the bending form) and the last thing I wanted to do was fight the spring tension of the bent coaming.




    Next step was to dimension some stock for the flange and taper the ends of it for the flange overlap. In hindsight I could have made this piece about 4 inches longer as the tapers did not quite match up, close enough not to worry about it though. Steamed the piece for 15 minutes and then snapped it in two going around the forward end of the coaming. Made another flange and cooked it for 23 minutes this time and had no problems.



    I then clamped the flange back in place and spaced the lacing holes out at inch and a half intervals. Ran the lacing twine through loosely and then went back over each section, tightening it as you go around. Rounded off the sharp corners and it’s ready for oil.





    Doug
     

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  2. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    As tight as I tried to get the coaming flange laced on there was still a little bit of movement between it and the riser. I know this would have got to me so I took the lacing out and glued the flange to the riser. Then went back and laced it again. Smoothed out the rough edges and oiled it. Also took out a little material on the bottom of deck beam #6 as it was digging into my shins a bit. Touched up a couple other spots on the boat, reoiled the touch-ups and now can officially call the frame completed. Although it will probably go down as the slowest ever SOF build, I’m pretty pleased with the results so far and am looking forward now to skinning it.






    Doug
     

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  3. mbiraman

    mbiraman Paddler

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    The build looks great. There's no race, you've done it in your time, the way you want.
     
  4. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    staten island, new york
    When you're 3 miles into your first 6 mile crossing, the last thing on your mind will be, "couldn't I have done the build on this kayak faster?"
    And, 50 or 60 years from now, when you're finally ready to stop paddling, you can un-skin it, and hang it on the wall, as a beautiful decoration! Great job, Doug! :clap:
     
  5. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    Maple Ridge, BC
    Thanks guys. You're both right about the time. Wouldn't have enjoyed it half as much if there had been a deadline.
    Here's a couple pics of the finished frame and its final specs.



    Overall Length - 18' 5"
    Beam - 21.5"
    Weight - 33 lbs.

    Doug
     

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  6. Jurfie

    Jurfie Paddler

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    Gorgeous! :clap:
     
  7. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    Today I started skinning the boat. I decided to skin the boat using a method by Corey Freedman of The Skinboat School. His method produces a flat seam down the center of the kayak.
    First step was to flip the boat upside down and lay the material (12 oz. nylon) along its length. Sewed a pocket around the bow stem, lifted the pocket off the stem and moved the material back 3 inches, and sewed another pocket around the aft stem. You then unhook the aft pocket, rehook the bow pocket and stretch the fabric back to grab the aft pocket again. Then pinned the length of the material along the keel line to keep it centered.



    Flipped the kayak right side up and installed temporary battens along the centerline in order to keep the seams straight. Used a soldering iron with a knife tip to cut off the excess nylon, leaving about 4 inches of overlap on each side. Then, starting from the cockpit, ran a running stitch towards the bow, pulling and tensioning the skin as I went. Kept the deck wet as I sewed as it is suppose to relax the material and will then tighten up as it dries. The front took quite a while to complete, that learning curve again, but the aft end went quite a bit quicker.







    Doug
     

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  8. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    I’ve got a question about skin tension. Is it possible to damage anything by over tensioning the skin? After sewing the skin up while wet and then letting it dry, it really seems to have drawn up pretty tight. I don’t have any experience with this so I don’t know what is normal. If I wet the deck down again and then take an iron to it for the shrinking process, can any harm be done?
    Thanks, Doug
     
  9. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    I have yet to warp a frame so badly that it doesn't spring right back as soon as there's a few drops of water inside the kayak, though some of my skins are tight enough to show that little bit of pull on the stringers, there's usually enough water from your feet as you get in, to relax the nylon just that little bit.
    That's all part and parcel of paddling a skin on frame boat... they move and change, as though you're paddling a living thing... that's what I love most about them!
     
  10. DarenN

    DarenN Paddler

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    i use a slightly different method. i sew the skin on dry, pulling it tight as possible. when the skin is sewn and the cockpit sewn on, i soak the skin down really well, and then let it dry naturally. i've heard the frames creaking and groaning as the skin drys and shrinks. never had any trouble. the frames i've built have all been in the Greenland style; as is yours.
     
  11. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    Thanks guys. I don’t think I will take the iron to it after all. Like Daren suggests I’ll just soak the whole boat down and let it dry on its own.
    Daren, those creaking noises were the reasons I was a little concerned. It was pretty cool hearing the wood do that but I wasn’t expecting it and was just waiting for the boat to implode. Glad to hear it’s normal, next time I can enjoy it a little more. Sit out in the garage with a beer listening to your boat dry, there’s an afternoon to look forward to.
    Thanks, Doug
     
  12. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    Today I finished the seam down the length of the boat. First step was to trim off the excess material on the port side, leaving about a 3/8” flap. Second step was to trim the material off the starboard side, leaving about a ¾” flap (talk about being careful with a soldering iron at this point). You then fold the longer starboard flap over the shorter port flap, press the material flat and run a stitch along the edge. Works out nice as this stitch virtually disappears.






    Doug
     

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  13. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    If you put your ear up to that little hole in the coaming area, can you hear the ocean? :lol: Nice straight seam, and well done! I used to think such straight seams were impossible for me, when I was using 8oz nylon, but sunce I switched to 12oz, they seemed to straghten out... now I have to make a concious effort to make my seams meander fron side to side. Guess I got used to the look, and want to keep it.
    Looks like a launch is just around the corner :big_thumb
     
  14. Kudzu

    Kudzu Paddler

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    I have been watching your build (in silence) and just totally impressed with the quality and attention to detail of your work on the frame. I notice the small things and you didn't seem to skip over any of them. Your frame was a work of art and it seems a shame to cover it. Of course we build them to paddle, not to look at ...... but that was something to look at!
     
  15. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    David, (glad to catch your name a couple posts back) that small hole just shows how scared I am of cutting off any more material than necessary right now. How about incorporating it into a built-in spray skirt of some kind? It’s really been an interesting and fun build. There has been a number of steps along the way where I think “how is this possibly going to work” or “this could go so wrong so quick” but it’s all fallen into place so far. I know what you mean about the seam line also. It doesn’t look really natural or authentic being straight and I probably wouldn’t get so concerned about it next time. I’m hoping for a launch early in the New Year. I treated myself and ordered a Greenland paddle that should be showing up sometime in January so I’m hoping the arrival of that and the completion of the boat are pretty close. Wouldn’t seem right to use a Euro blade with it.
    Thanks Jeff. I watched your videos on bending coaming strips and was ready to go that route if that first piece of oak didn’t cooperate. You appeared way more relaxed bending those strips than I did. A few people have said it’s going to be tough to skin it but I didn’t give it much thought. It wasn’t until I actually sewed it up that I realized how much I really liked looking at the frame itself. Oh well, Q2 and Q3 are not far away.

    Doug
     
  16. Kudzu

    Kudzu Paddler

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    After 4 or 5 skinning is no big deal! :wink:

    One thing to watch on the coaming, assuming you're going to fold the skin over to hide the cut edge when you sew it on. Don't leave it long! You will end up with the edge peaking out from under the cockpit at the bottom. I have found that if I trim mine even with the top of the coaming it leaves it just right to fold and not be exposed.

    I have shifted from Nylon to polyester for most of mine and that has been like starting over. Different techniques and different problems. But after 4 boats I finally have my my methods worked out.
     
  17. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    Doug, There's absolutely nothing wrong with a straight seam, as I said, I've even gotten better at them since I changed to 12oz nylon. I used to use 8oz, and, between carpal tunnel and arthritis, can only sew a few feet before my hands need a break, so, with the lighter fabric, I tended to go all over the place. (though I do admit to wandering intentionally at times :wink: )
    Funny you should mention the idea that things could go so wrong so fast... too many very experienced paddlers often forget that same phrase, then end up in serious trouble for no good reason. :shock:

    Looking forward to the launch,
    David Mills
     
  18. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    So this weekend I got the coaming attached. For some reason this process stressed me out more than just about anything else on this build. I was nervous about accidentally cutting off too much material when trimming the opening to fit the coaming.
    First step was to drill a series of holes around the coaming, just underneath the flange. I spaced them 1” apart and used a piece of hardwood as a guide to set them all at the same height.


    Next was to position the coaming on the masik and aft deck stringers and clamp it down. Tightened the straps until the coaming actually took on the shape of a potato chip. Kept expecting to hear it crack but it surprised me and held together. Then came the stressful part for me. Cutting out the material inside the cockpit until it was trimmed up flush with the top edge of the coaming. At this point I really didn’t want to slip with the soldering iron and trim too much off or puncture the skin. Once it was trimmed and clamped to the coaming I inserted nails through the skin, slightly below each hole, and then started the nail in the hole and levered it up and in to tighten the skin a little more. Once I had a bunch of nails in place I was ready to sew the coaming in place.




    Took the top cut edge of the nylon and folded it down against the coaming, pulled the skin tight and started lacing it together. After you’ve gone around the coaming once you then go around a second time, in and out in the opposite direction to fill in the gaps. I did accidentally cut the black twine lacing on the flange and ended up redoing it with artificial sinew as it is easier to keep the sinew taut while lacing.




    I’ve now soaked the skin down and am waiting for it to dry so I can apply the poly coating and coloring.
    Doug
     

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  19. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    Looks terriffic, Doug! Seems as though you'll have no problem making the January deadline, and should have a kayak to be proud of for years to come!
     
  20. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Beautiful BC
    Gorgeous boat! :clap:

    Like the blue straps too. :wink:

    *****