SOF Build

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by paddlesores, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. RoyN

    RoyN Paddler

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    Location:
    Burien, WA
    You may find you want a longer loom on your GP. The loom length on my GP is 24" and I'm 5'-1" tall. Loom length needs to be what ever is comfortalble for you.
     
  2. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    staten island, new york
    Loom length on my paddles average 17"- 20"... if you want wider, it's usually preferable to shave the shoulders down, to make it more fluid to slide the paddle for either a sweep, or a sliding stroke. personally, I like a bit of shoulder, but not too much.
    My personal paddles are 19" in the loom, with the palms of my hands on the top of the blade, it just seems most comfortable. OTOH, if you make the loom too narrow, remember thet it's always easier to shave a bit of wood off, than put it back on :yikes:
     
  3. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    Location:
    Maple Ridge, BC
    To determine the loom length on the GP I ordered, Bill had given me some homework. He had me take my regular paddle and run a piece of masking tape down its length. I then marked out the distances from its center in each direction. Then took it out for a paddle and throughout the morning just looked at my hand position and noted the marked distance between my fore finger and middle finger. We’ll see how it works out. I’ve heard some pretty good things from people who own a Lumpy Paddle so am looking forward to getting it. The paddle I’m building now will probably see more use by my wife so that is part of the reason for the shorter (and a little narrower) loom.
    David, I went and bought some 100% tung oil from Lee Valley. I’ll apply a coat of that each day for 5 or 6 days and see how it turns out.
    Doug
     
  4. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    Tung oil is great stuff! I recomend applying it very heavy, and heating it with a hot air gun for two coats, then allowing it to dry and polymerize for 3days, then rub it down with red scotchbrite, followed with one or two finish coats. That's all you need, then re-coat once a year. More than that is needless overkill, and won't protect your wood any better... the heat is the key, driving the oil into the wood, where it can polymerize inside the surface.
     
  5. west_coast_russ

    west_coast_russ Paddler

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    Stumpy, do you use 100% tung oil or polymerized tung oil?
     
  6. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    Russ, sorry for the delay, my computer's been down with a virus, but seems to be better now :mrgreen:

    I don't use tung oil at all. I use teak oil, which has a seriously low viscosity, penetrates very well, and polimerizes inside the wood. Pure tung oil is a high viscosity, gelatinous glob, which has to be heated to near boiling to be applied to any wood surface, and costs about $90US a pound. the compounds that are normally sold as 100% tung oil are really linseed oil, fortified with a drop or two of linseed oil, either raw (non-polimerized) or boiled (polimerized)... they do work well, but for my own use, I prefer the teak oil, though next paddle I make for myself, I'll probably leave it out in the weather for six months or so, to let it weather before oiling it. I like the look of a well used, beat-up paddle.

    BTW, don't use the non- polimerized "tung" oil, it is designed to not harden, and will stay sticky for a long, long time. Raw linseed oils is used in "bottom" paints for boats that stay in the water, which is painted on with the boat in a sling, then dropped immediately in the water, so the barnacles and junk can be scraped off easier later.
     
  7. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    Location:
    Maple Ridge, BC
    Boat’s done, paddle’s done, nothing but blue sky today so it was time to launch. We headed out to Deep Cove for the maiden voyage this afternoon. Really was a beautiful day to do it. Little nervous about how it would handle so spent a bunch of time with the avataq getting somewhat comfortable with the boat. It seems to paddle great, tracks nice, feels like it slips through the water effortlessly, loving it so far. Definitely going to have to spend some time working on skills though. It really is a good feeling paddling something you built yourself.






    I would like to say a big thank you to all for your help, suggestions, and encouragement. As a first time builder it’s really been helpful being able to ask questions and get direction from those with more experience. Thanks also to the administrators of WCP for providing this forum, it must take up loads of your time, but I really do appreciate it.
    Thanks again,
    Doug
     

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  8. Kheyashunka

    Kheyashunka Paddler

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    :big_thumb
     
  9. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    staten island, new york
    The proof is in the paddling :clap: Looks like a wonderful place to get it wet, too! :big_thumb
     
  10. west_coast_russ

    west_coast_russ Paddler

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    Location:
    Victoria
    Beautiful pics - great job on the boat. Thanks for the inspiration..
     
  11. newfie in Alberta

    newfie in Alberta Paddler

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    That is a boat to be proud of!!
     
  12. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    A beautiful boat gracing the waters of Indian Arm - and other waters I'm sure.
    looks great.
     
  13. Greg

    Greg Paddler

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    WOW! beautiful kayak, nice job.
     
  14. GeroV

    GeroV Paddler

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    Nov 18, 2014
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    :big_thumb :big_thumb

    Doug,
    beautiful boat and your craftsmanship and attention to detail during the build have been first rate. I just finished a Shearwater 17 S&G, but you've inspired me to build one of these as well.

    One question I had for you is what thread did you use to lash the hull together, as well as the coaming and fabric?

    Thanks, and happy paddling,
    Gero
     
  15. Roy

    Roy Paddler

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    Jun 2, 2007
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    Location:
    West Vancouver
    Nice work
     
  16. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    Nov 24, 2007
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    Location:
    Maple Ridge, BC
    Thanks Gero,

    The thread I used is called artificial sinew. It's available at Tandy Leather but I got mine from Corey Freedman at the Skinboat School (http://www.skinboats.org/) when I ordered the skin material and coating.
    Have fun with your build and be sure to post some pics here. Any questions feel free to ask, I'll help if I can and there's lots of folks here that were a huge help to me as I went through the process.

    Doug
     
  17. GeroV

    GeroV Paddler

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    Nov 18, 2014
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    Thanks for the link, Doug - this looks like one stop shopping for me :cool :cool

    Here are two pictures of my Shearwater - I couldn't stand the thought of drilling holes in it so I made maple deck bits for the bungie cords as well as a maple paddle park. Nice contrast to the sapele, if you ask me. I also made the paddle - cherry shaft with a blade of alternating maple, cherry and bubinga, with a maple blade tip.
     
  18. GeroV

    GeroV Paddler

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    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    90
    Doug,
    going back a page - can I ask you what pigments you chose in terms of color and who makes it as I like the way your boat turned out.

    I'm going to start my build shortly - need to do some workshop reconfiguration first...

    Thanks,
    Gero
     
  19. paddlesores

    paddlesores Paddler

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    Nov 24, 2007
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    Location:
    Maple Ridge, BC
    Gero,

    For the first kayak I bought a selection of rare earth pigments from Sinopia Pigments out of San Francisco. When my wife and I built our latest kayaks we bought the pigments from Corey at the Skinboat School. I would go to Corey again for all my supplies. The first kayak I used a pigment called Burnt Sienna. The second kayak, whose colouring I like better, was a mixture of two different pigments. I didn't keep track of things in much detail for the second build so I can't say what the combination consisted of. Below is one of the few pics with both kayaks together. Don't be afraid to mix them up and experiment. To get an idea of the final colour you can mix some pigment in cooking oil and put it on some pieces of the nylon.





    Doug
     
  20. GeroV

    GeroV Paddler

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    90
    Thanks Doug. I talked to my lumber supplier and should be hearing back from him on the availability of an 18' cedar 2x4. Otherwise I'll see if he has a 2x10x10 and rip and resaw that. Already have the ash for the ribs from a paddle project, so this could get underway soon.

    Since I'll be ordering the sinew and skin/poly kit from skinboats.com, I'll get the pigment there as well. I really like how yours have turned out.

    Gero