SoF dimensions

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by GeroV, Jun 1, 2015.

  1. GeroV

    GeroV Paddler

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    I built my first kayak last fall - a Shearwater 17, and I am about to (finally) get to work on my SoF kayak. I would like to be able to use it for some photography, so I was thinking of making it a little shorter and a little wider. Are there limitations with respect to length/width and a person's size (6'4", 195lbs) that should be taken into consideration?

    I'll also make an SoF in the more traditional, sleek dimensions, simply because one SoF is never enough - right Stumpy??? :cool :cool :cool
     
  2. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    It's a fairly forgiving method of building, so as long as you keep to the basic parameters of other boats that fit your wants and loading I wouldn't think it'd cause major issues.
     
  3. GeroV

    GeroV Paddler

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    Thank you Mick - that's good to know. It will also allow me to build a boat that's a bit more stable for my kids to use.

    Gero
     
  4. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    I don't think that the SOF building style will make much difference; it's the design that matters. - as Mick implies.
    If you take a hard-chine (stitch and glue) design and build it in SOF, the performance should be very similar (though you'll have quite a lot less interior space in the SOF).
    If you look around on the web, or get your hands on some reviews from SeaKayaker magazine (RIP), you can find cross-sections and dimensions that can give you some ideas.
    You can simulate your hull design with software like the old 'Hulls' program or some modern equivalent. With S&G you can build the hull and then water test it (without deck) to find the right spot for the seat, but that's not possible with SOG, I suppose.
     
  5. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    Since you already made a CLC Shearwater, I guess it'd be natural to stick with that program:


    **

    for those who aren't familiar with it, here's the "CLC wood duck" reference:
     
  6. GeroV

    GeroV Paddler

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    Mick,
    my thought was to take the elements of an SoF according to the Cunningham book, but shorten it to about 15' and make it 24-25" wide. It will mainly be for the kids, but I'd like to be able to get in with my camera and feel relative stability in the boat. The bottom would be relatively flat, and it would have additional chines to help bring the fabric around the frame. It would also have a larger cockpit. I guess, using the CLC lineage, it would be like making a Shearwater sport, only in a SoF variation.

    In parallel, I'll be building an 18' long, 22" wide SoF for myself.
     
  7. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    Sounds fine to me, but you should realize that your specs cover quite the range: wide and stable for big folk photoing and yet interesting paddling for smaller.
     
  8. GeroV

    GeroV Paddler

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    It does cover the range, but I'm also taking into consideration that my kids will get bigger (my son is already growing like a weed), and they'll be able to transition to the narrower boats. I understand that the boat will have some limitations, but that's part of the fun of experimenting, building, and figuring it out.
     
  9. Roy222

    Roy222 Paddler

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    GeroV,
    If you are building your SOF for rugged use (Kids & knock about ) consider adding a Lattice floor;
    a removable floor like "Old Town" canoes had. The floor migh add a little weight, but would help
    save the fabric from internal punch thru's.

    Sounds like a fun project, good luck!


    Roy