SOF gunwale ??

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by mbiraman, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. mbiraman

    mbiraman Paddler

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    So i've been studying Cunningham's book and have been reading various posts on WCP site and i have a question. There seems to be a difference of opinion about the need for cutting the gunwales out of one piece of stock and i was wondering has anyone built a Greenland type kayak with randomly picked gunwale stock and did you notice any tracking issues or imbalances from it. I'm assuming that small knot select or better dimensional 1x3 or so being used. Part of the reason i'm asking this is its hard to get decent wood around here as all the mills and yards etc are set up for something else. Darren i'm hoping you'll chime in here. Thanks
     
  2. DarenN

    DarenN Paddler

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    did you mean me (Daren), or that other guy (Darren) over on the Island? :wink:

    at any rate, i'll take a shot.
    all of the SOFs i've built have been done with full length pieces of WRC. the gunwales were always cut 'mirror image' from the same board.i know that some other builders have built SOFs with gunwales and stringers that have been pieced together; (ie, scarph joined); but i haven't. that said, careful choice of lumber and thoughtful planning should allow you to get a nice fair kayak out of shorter pieces. for example; take two 2x4s 8 feet long and scarf them into a 15 foot (ish)[whatever 12/1 ends up at] length. lay out the rib mortices and rout them. then rip the 2x4 into your gunwales.
    i'm quite sure that the Inuit peoples of antiquity were not always able to find long clear lumber with which to build their Qayaqs, and they didn't have access to the high-quality adhesives that we do today, but they still fed their families.
    the most important part is to just do it and enjoy the proccess. i once built a frame just to see how small i could go and get away with. i skinned it with pallet wrap and tested it in a backyard pool. the decks were awash but it kept me afloat! :lol: to call it 'twitchy' would have been generous. :cool
     
  3. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    and to add: frame stock is small compared to the overall size of the boat, so the beams, and ribs, stringers and especially the skin, all will work together to keep or enforce a desired shape: so keep a balanced shape during the build.
    As in all build processess, it is important to keep or make alignment and balance of the parts during the build and not end up in the lousy position of noticing something out of whack near the end when it is so frustrating to have to deal with.

    so at the very least, jam a string or draw a line on the build board, etc. betw the gunwale ends so that you can sight the g/w curvature as the beams are going in. Maybe clamp a 'vertical' at the middle of ea. g/w to see if the angles are similar. Place intitial frame on floor or table to see if warped. If you notice an imbalance, fix it now by gunwale thinning or resetting the beams or whatever you have to so that balance and evenness is maintained and then problems and their consequences will be kept small.
     
  4. mbiraman

    mbiraman Paddler

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    Thanks you guys. Darren, it was you i was hoping would chime in as i had noticed you'd built a number of boats.
    Is there any preference to using face cut or VG material??. I've downloaded the F1 drawings and am drawn to this kayak for some reason but also think about raising the deck on the Greenland to better fit my body and back.
     
  5. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    I think only two of my builds have been full length gunwales, and finding clear 2X material in my area is next to impossible. The difference may be that I use fuselage construction rather than traditional, so the frames may be a contributing factor in keeping the lines fair.
    I also am enamored with the F1, and have a hybridzed design that is very similar in hull shape... I can attest to Brian's statement that it is a surprizingly fast kayak for being so short (14feet, in my case). I am planning to build the next one 5% larger to accomodate my larger, overfed body, but have paddled the first one, which I built to the original specs, and had almost an inch of freeboard below th gunwales.
     
  6. mbiraman

    mbiraman Paddler

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    Thanks stumpy. I'm 6'-205#, do you think the original drawing size would work for me??. Its possible i might be able to find 2x clear cedsr around here, trouble is the yard that use to have allot, i was the one using it for shoji screens and pretty much depleted the stock. That was six yrs ago and the market has changed around here .When you say fuselage construction do you mean plywood frames every so often throughout the length of the boat?.
     
  7. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    You might be ok, though I'd be tempted to stretch it another 6", to give you a bit more displacement and footroom, and maybe 1/2" beamier, but not much more... I have about 40 more pounds on you, and wasn't uncomfortable, though I'd prefer a bit more freeboard for myself. Yes, fuselage construction is with plywood frames.
    I've only made one shoji, a 3X5 self- contained, 4-panel unit, with the panels sliding vertically, but I used cherry for that one, and labored over the custom made counterweights :| ... looked nice, though
     
  8. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    BTW, something you should know before you start, you DO need all of the rocker in the bow, that Brian shows in his drawing, or you'll end up with a tracking monster, that needs a small stick of dynamite to get it to turn (I learned from experience), unless you plan on long, straight, one-way paddles :lol: . My first attempt only turns by sliding my GP out to the end, and sweeping it around, but it tracks like a freight train. Someday I'll launch it pointed toward Paris, and just keep paddling... never been there...