SOF Seabee13 Build

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by Iwannapaddle, Sep 26, 2009.

  1. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    I had to give it a try - to satisfy myself :?

    Thanks stumpy - I was wondering about sewing around that........

    Nothing ventured nothing gained........

    heh-heh - spoken like a true fisherman :wink:
     
  2. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Please see my footnote/signature below :oops:
     
  3. Kheyashunka

    Kheyashunka Paddler

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    Might I suggest more of a baidarka stern, vice the rowboat ... would probably only require the addition of ply plate perpendicular to that transom.. Once you skin it will have a unique tail shape..
     
  4. DarenN

    DarenN Paddler

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    what a great idea!! :D
     
  5. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Kheya and Daren - now THAT sounds interesting !!!!!!!!

    Where? Where can I find a close enough detail of one? :)
     
  6. Kheyashunka

    Kheyashunka Paddler

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    http://www.traditionalkayaks.com/Kayakr ... lsize.html

    I think you would only have to approximate the frame tail piece. The skinning process creates the real hull shape of course.
     
  7. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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  8. kelly t

    kelly t Paddler

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    As I understand it, you had an issue with the stringers being too short to create the fair curves if you had run them out to the full length....

    One idea to create the longer end would be, as suggested the top plate as shown on Tom Yost's Nikumi.

    I would take a piece of wood and create an end form, like used in stripping a hull. That could be mortised into your 'transom' plate, with a rabbeted top plate providing lateral stability.... Just another idea for ya t' ponder....
     
  9. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Actually, in my haste, I cut the stringers a little too short :oops:

    Although all the ideas everyone has given me are just great.

    Well, that will have to wait a while now, as I stripped it all down today so as to sand down the ribs/sections properly and give them all a coat of sealant.

    We have used some Industrial Formulators 2 part "S1 Sealant" stinks like heck but hopefully it has sealed the plywood well.

    It's a lot warmer in my girlfriend's studio so they're hanging out to dry there :)

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    I have the temperature up to 22 deg C in there so hopefully I can give it all a 2nd coat tomorrow night.

    I see the sealant instructions indicate that three coats are required - although I was wondering if two would be sufficient as I am planning on coating them all with polyurethane once the kayak is assembled.

    Hopefully water-based polyurethane will take and adhere over this sealant?
     
  10. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    The S-1 requires sanding to get the next thing to adhere to it: http://www.ippnet.com/index.php/fibregl ... y-products

    S1 is an excellent undercoat primers for most paints and clear finishes. To ensure maximum adhesion, sand lightly but thoroughly to a uniform dull finish before applying latex, enamels, more epoxy, varnish, polyurethanes or bottom paints. When used as an exterior clear finish over wood, S-1 must be over-coated with varnish or a suitable polyurethane to protect the surfaces from ultra violet rays.

    Polyurethanes should cure over it; other paints, maybe not. Epoxy's amines sometimes inhibit alkyd and latex paints. Pays to test before dommitting.
     
  11. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Thanks Dave, really appreciated.

    Would you suggest a laquer-based polyurethane for coating as opposed to a water-based?
     
  12. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Whichever floats your boat. You can typically get by with fewer coats of the solvent-based one (reduce with mineral spirits = paint thinner, I believe), but it stinks. The water-based ones are OK, but take another coat or two to get the same thickness. Less odor, and nice to clean up with water.

    For a durable exterior finish on a boat, you might take a page from Dan and the others and try the System Three 2-part water-based LPU (linear polyurethane). Dan has some detail on his method of using the stuff on one of his build albums, I think. They have generated some beautiful finishes with it. For your frames, though, you just want to protect them.
     
  13. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    IMHO, the polyurethane over the epoxy on your frames isn't really neccessary, as it's only used as a uv barrier to keep the glossy finish on the epoxy from dulling to a satin sheen with sun exposure... there isn't that much uv getting through the skin, and, are you really worried about how shiny your frames are, anyway?
    I avoid the issue by skipping the epoxy altogether, and triple coating my frames with wb poly after lashing the stringers, thus sealing both the ply edges, as well as the sinew lashing. I have tremendous faith in the durability of wb finishes, having used them extensively in the furniture business for 20 years or so, without a failure to date.
     
  14. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Yeah, the sealer seems overkill to me, also. The water-based polyurethanes have come a long ways. Stumpy has done a fair number of these. Might check to see what Yost recommends, also.
     
  15. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Thanks again Dave n Dave .........

    The one coating of sealer for now will do and we'll do a couple of coats of WB LPU once everything is together.

    All the assistance and advice is really appreciated.
     
  16. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    A few progress-pics to date.....

    Mr B's seabee from the early stages...

    It certainly helped being able to draw all the rib-sections up in ACAD and print them out full size and then trace them onto the wood using graphite-paper

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    Mr. B's completed and sanded presactly to dimensions rib-sections... he sure looks a happy builder :)

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    Lining up and leveling the sections with the gunwhales prior to fitting the rest of the chine stringers

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    The beginnings of the stern-plate for Mr. B's seabee..

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    That took a fair amount of fitting, re-fitting, measuring and re-measuring before reaching satisfaction for the shape and size of the stern-plate...

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    AND AT ALL TIMES........ keep your HAT(CH) on......

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    Incidentally the first plan of mounting the hatch on a sheet of plywood on the rear deck was scrapped in favor of some lighter cross-sections of WRC pegged and lashed onto th erear deck stringers....


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    The stern and the modified baidarka kinda style stern-plate and fitting.....

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    Thanks to all the suggestions of the 'yak builders on this site :)

    That took some bracing and mounting and shaping to get those chines to fit - thus the slotted 2 x 4 to hold the plate in place...
     
  17. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    Now that's adding 20%innovation! I like it! would you consider changing the stem to a bifid bow? I've started a baidarka just recently, and am having trepidations about sewing the bow myself...
     
  18. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Um.......ehhh. nah....... Changing to a bifid bow well, maybe on the next Seabee :)

    I am still trying to figure out the technological advantages of a bifid bow? :?: :oops:
     
  19. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    So are most other people :lol: I personally think the Aleuts did it just to confuse future boat builders, and scare off skin boat sewing chickens :shock:
     
  20. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Much to the chagrin of our esteemed colleague George Dyson - methinks too they did it to scare the seals and whales :lol: :lol: