SOF Seabee13 Build

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by Iwannapaddle, Sep 26, 2009.

  1. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Coaming Shaping time.............

    no suitable dowel-sticks that will bend without breaking, 36 inch ruler just not bendy enough, no available plastic thin bendy-pliable-strips, but ahhhh.....

    Some thin off-cuts of WRC soaked in a tub of hot water for 30 minutes did the trick to get the "curvature" right..... :roll: :roll:

    [​IMG]



    Hmmm a thought - I have quite a few of these cut-off strips and am toying with the idea of bending and laminating them for a coaming.....

    Although this time of year, if I soak 6 foot lengths they're liable to freeze, which won't make them very bendy :shock:

    Hmmm... the bathtub overnight :cool :cool but shhhh... don't tell Mizz Vee :wink:
     
  2. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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  3. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    We're making progress with the Seabee's - yes, we are :)

    I must post some more photos soon.

    The frames and all the pegging/lashing of the joints is almost completed - whew - now there's a long and arduous task but really satisfying and gratifying when it all comes together :lol:

    NOW - for the FLOORING....

    Maybe not a big deal to many builders and Tom Yost has some really good methods of installing flooring - as can be seen from the attached photos.......

    Tom has used 1/16" x 3/4" aluminum angle brackets and stainless steel screws and locknuts to support and secure the flooring (1/2 inch thick pine) , as follows:

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    ALTHOUGH.........
    Looking at our construction and due to the concave cutouts of the undersides of cross-sections/ribs, we would have to raise that flooring somewhat .....

    I am thus toying with the idea instead of simply using a sheet of doorskin (3/16" plywood) which lays on top of the keel and bottom two stringers??? :?:

    But am wondering if this will be strong enough????

    Any thoughts/comments?
     
  4. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Doorskin is notorious for voids and weak areas. If you use Okume 4 mm plywood (marine grade: BS 1088), it might work, but I'd lay on a thickness of 6 oz glass to be sure. Half-inch pine is a lot sturdier than doorskin.
     
  5. kelly t

    kelly t Paddler

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    Another idea is to not install a floor at all...

    In my kayak, I used pieces of floor-mat foam cut to fit tightly between the keel stringer and the chine stringer. These sit right on the skin and bring my butt up enough so that a " keel wedgie " is prevented :D
    I may add a bit more foam to create a sort of custom seat on top of this to support my thighs and lower back (while still keeping my butt and weight low), but what I have done so far was to use a short thermarest mattress folded in thirds - one third as a 'seat' the other two thirds as back rest.... It was comfy enough, and easy to stuff in and take out, which makes cleaning out water and any grit super easy with a sponge.

    Either way, best of luck with the rest of your build, and keep those pics coming!

    kelly t
     
  6. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Thanks Dave and Kelly for the info - really appreciated.
    Dave - after more delibiration, I realized the doorskin or plywood really isn't a good idea - too much flat "area" for gunge to collect under....... also to get that plywood to flex or bend to the right shape may not be that simple - I was really looking for a "more simple" answer :)

    Kelly - ahhh yes, I don't have that much "derrierre padding" :) so anything that may allow a "Keel wedgie" I will stay away from :)
    That thermarest mattress as a temporary/removable seat is clever.

    I found some good 1 x 8 Fir down at our Home Depot yesterday and I'm going to rip that up for floorboards and use Tom Yost's method of mounting.
     
  7. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Here's a few more photos of the progress of MisterBee's and MizzVee's Seabee's


    We are pegging and lashing all of the stringer/cross-section joints with 3/16" dowels, Cold-Cure Epoxy and a double-wrap of artificial sinew.

    Once the sinew is secured, all knots are covered and sealed with epoxy as well.

    Misterbee contemplating "the next move" on shaping the stern - no, he's not contemplating using that clamp as a hammer :)

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    Misterbee's from Stern to Bow - this photos is a little off-center, but yes, the "straightness" and uniform curvature of the overall kayak has been checked MANY times :)

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    A better overall bow-to-stern shot of Misterbee's Seabee

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    Some detail of the "peg-n-lash" on MizzVee's.....the keel will not be pegged and lashed - just epoxied and lashed.

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    An overall "profile" of MizzVee's from stern to bow, still lots of "lashing tails" to be trimmed off there.
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    Some more detail of the double-lashing ... some clean-up needed here before the epoxy sets...

    [​IMG]


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    A bow-to-stern view of MizzVee's - all pegging and lashing completed and ready for the floor and base-coaming to be fitted.
    The loops of sinew visible are to hold the fore-deck stringer in place while the epoxy sets.

    [​IMG]

    The bow-plate almost completed with all stringers pegged and lashed and epoxied - some fine cleanup needed there too......
    I will be leaving the lashing in place permanently on the bow as there is a fair amount of tension on those chine stringers....

    All the lashings will be sealed over with a coating of epoxy to help prevent abrasion.

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    The completed "baidarka-style" stern-plate completed. Here the lashing will stay in place permanently too...

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    Well, these will have to now wait for a few days - a good time to let all that epoxy cure .....
    Only because I have another "SEATING" project to do here at home - I had to rip out the toilet in the house and replace all the seals and the flooring as the "throne" was on the point of falling through the floor after years of leakage - aaargh.... not an easy task in a small 3ft x 5ft toilet........ :shock:

    HERE'S WISHING ALL YOU GOOD PEOPLE AND HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR :p
     
  8. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Those are looking very nice. I am impressed with the care you are taking with the lashings and their protection.

    It looks to me that the scantlings for the MrBee version are substantially herkier than for the MsBee. Is that a correct impression? Just wondering how much heavier, if that is the case, and how you decided how much heavier to make the masculine version.

    Keep up the great work. It is a real treat to see these boats come up in "real time!"
     
  9. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    That took me a little while to look up the meaning of
    :shock: :lol:

    MisterBee has followed the Tom Yost plans to the "T" and is building a qajak to planned dimensions, erring somewhat slightly on the herky side for all plywood scantlings :)

    MisterGee on the other hand, who tends to lean more to the "Iwannamakeitdifferent" decided ih his wisdom to raise the fore and aft-deck dimensions of the MizzVee Seabee by one and one half inches - providing additional aft-hold storage area (to be accessed through the deck-hatch modification) and some additional foot-space in the fore.... :shock: :cool
    Thus the ribs/sections are a little more on the scant side to save on weight !!!!!!!!!

    It will be interesting to see the difference in completed weights at the end of the day?

    Well, back to the royal-throne repairs which have taken priority right now.
     
  10. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Ahhhh - at long last - the repairs to the "Royal Throne" have been completed, together with a total re-paint and flooring and trimmings of both the bathroom and toilet - thank goodness that's over :)

    So now it's back to kayak's yay........

    Here's a few more progress photo's to date.

    The flooring has been fitted as per Tom Yosts's plans - a few very minor changes but very much was Tom has done.


    I used some nice clean Fir for the flooring - knot-free 1/2 inch thickness.

    What I did add though was add some nuts on the bolts coming through the bottom of the aluminum angle brackets (securing the bolts) - figuring that if I ever want to remove or replace the flooring - having locknuts on top of the wood - those bolts may be too tricky to get something underneath to hold the bolt??

    I have cut recess in the underside of the flooring to accommodate for these nuts ....

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    The completed floor fitted with the locknuts:

    [​IMG]

    Next - onto the coaming rings........

    Definitely not the easiest task to get all those coaming rings the same shape :shock:

    Although I found - cutting out and trimming one of the coaming rings first - getting it as near as perfect, then using this as a template for the rest of the rings....
    This is where the router table fitted with a 1 1/2 inch flush-trim finishing bit came in really handy.



    The bottom coaming ring was made a little wider than the center two rings - the skin will come up and over this ring, so I made this ring 1 inch wide - just a little more strength as I don't want the skin to pull that ring out of shape when it shrinks.......

    The stanchons have been fitted too, to the inside of the guwhales to provide some additional support for the coaming.......
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    The other three coaming rings have been epoxied together........
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    A bow-to-stern photo of the MizzVee Seabee....

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    A stern-to-bow view of the Misterbee Seabee, looking really good :)

    [​IMG]


    Misterbee has taken care with fitting these stem-plates...
    Week 1 all the stringers were carefully trimmed to size and epoxied and clamped...
    This weekend once the epoxy had set, all the stringers were pegged onto the plates.....

    [​IMG]

    A wee bit of cleaning up of excess epoxy there needed, but otherwise looking REALLY good..........

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    A few more progress pics......

    Looking towards the rear with the coaming completed, hatch-ring fitted and the rear floatation:

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    The completed and epoxied coaming - still needs a sanding and a couple of coats of polyurethane.

    A "slight" deviation from Tom Yosts's plans here:
    The bottom ring, which is fitted and will be under the skin is 1 inch wide as opposed to the 3/4 inch width of the other rings - to give a little more strength.

    The top ring is also 1/2 inch plywood as opposed to the 1/4 inch plywood suggested by Tom Yost - the reasoning being - heck - we have LOTS of 1/2 inch plywood.
    I have chamfered the outer edge by about 1/4 inch to finish it off.



    I am still wondering which would be the best and most durable polyurethane to use to seal the coaming as this will get the most abuse?

    A good laquer-based poly or just a few coats of WB Poly?

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    The hardware store PU choices are either solvent-based (paint thinner cleanup) or water-based. Neither compares to the water-based two-part LPU from System Three. Two-part LPU (the "L" stands for "linear") crosslinks when the secomd part is added, so that the coating is extremely durable and water resistant. The other PU's are nowhere near as durable or water resistant.

    the S3 WR-LPU is expensive, but worth it, in my view. Goes on pretty much like the ordinary water-based PU.
     
  13. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Thanks Dave, much appreciated - would the S3 WR-LPU be good for coating/sealing the ballistic nylon skin too?
     
  14. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Not sure. Is the hardware-store water-based PU OK for the nylon? My recollection from a buddy's build of a SOF yak many years ago was ity required a special stuff. This is what Brian Schulz says about that: Finally the whole thing is coated with spirit line's proprietary, super tough 2 part polyurethane, the only product in existance designed specifically for coating skin boats.

    Go here for more: http://www.capefalconkayak.com/The%20mo ... kayak.html

    Spirit Line's stuff: http://shop.skinboats.com/product.sc?pr ... tegoryId=1

    Costwise, looks comparable with the System Three variant, and I bet the SL standard order would have enough to do the coamings, etc. Stumpy probably knows better.
     
  15. DarenN

    DarenN Paddler

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    i've coated several balistic nylon kayaks in Varathane one part PU. the first one, i got a couple years out of, then sold it to Dan. he used it for a few years and sold it to Mike Jackson (i think), still holding out the ocean. if that kayak is still in service it would be about six or seven years old.
     
  16. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    System III is good, and should work for the skin as well, if you do the first 2-3 coats reduced 50/50 with water, to allow maximum penetration in the nylon, and apply it with a brush, or paint pad, working it thoroughly into the fabric. Personally, I use Target Coatings' # 9300 water based polycarbonate, with cross linker in the last one or two coats only. I buy it in 5 gallon buckets, at about half the price of what I have to pay for Sys. III, and the product is more than satisfactory for coating epoxy or nylon. visit www.targetcoatings.com for a retailer near you, if you're interested
    My first skinboat was finished with minwax Aquaseal exterior poly, and was unblemished for two seasons, when I decided to alter the frame, and reskinned the kayak, so I didn't do a full 5yr test on it
    Adding the cross-linker to the poly significantly shortens the working window in any wb poly, so I don't bother with it until the last coat or two, in case I should get delayed recoating for any reason. since I do hand painted artwork on my skins between the primer coats and finish coats, this allows me time to do that without having to sand the artwork before the finish coats.
     
  17. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Thanks Stumpy and Dave......

    Yes, Daren you advised me last time when I rebuilt that old 85 pounder kayak I re-finished :)

    I did also give that kayak 2 coats of high-quality Benjamin Moore's Prime Outdoor Latex as well. I have been quite rough with it and it's been scraped and scuffed a few times to the degree that the paint came off, but I can't say I ever saw any leaks at all.


    Why I asked the questions above was, if I do get some System III for the coaming etc. instead of wasting it I was wanting to use it up on the skin.
     
  18. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    That's a good way to use it up, I usually use 2/3 to 3/4 gallon to finish a kayak with wb poly, depending on how high a finish you want. The skin will be sealed, and water tight at around 1/2 gallon, but I like a fuller sheen to my boats. By the time you've put 1/2 gal on, it takes about 6- 8 oz per coat for the whole skin.
     
  19. Iwannapaddle

    Iwannapaddle Paddler

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    Not quite as eleganet as the S&G builds currently on this forum....

    Although........

    Weighing in at....... 22lbs..

    One Seabee13 Modified - raised deck and rear Hatch.......

    Ready for sealing/varnishing:

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    There's the two "floatation" thingamabobs made of blue styrofoam standing on end in the background - total weight = 2 lbs


    We are endeavouring - once completed - to "hopefully" keep the weight really close to or under 40lbs.

    Raw skin weight - as of yet uncut - 8lbs
     
  20. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    With the colorful garden, I can't wait to see what you do with the skins! Keep in mind, if you use WB poly, you can easily tint them, with acrylic paints, or Tintsall dyes, or, after the initial coat or two of thinned poly, you can actually paint them using the acrylics, but add a bit of WB poly in with the paint, to ensure bonding.
    I figure the skin/ poly adds ten pounds per boat, , so, if you want to lighten it, now's the time to attack the inside of the stringers with a router/ rasp combination. I was able to pare off 5 pounds from a baidarka frame by spending a few hours shaving the strigers down, without weakening the frame too much, but it was an incredibly dusty undertaking.
    I think I've posted my 14' Koi boat here somewhere, and I've done an 18'-8" giant squid, among others.