Tuilik

Discussion in 'General Paddling Discussions' started by Layback, Dec 4, 2016.

  1. Layback

    Layback Paddler

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
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    Location:
    Burnaby, BC
    I was going to post this in the thread about Paulo's videos. But, I figured that was getting off topic.

    However, that thread provides a good opening to comment on the tuilik that I bought from Paulo earlier this year. Bottom line is that I really like it. Combined with two fleece hoodies (one light, one heavy) that he also made for me, I find that I can adapt to most weather conditions.

    The number one reason I bought the tuilik was to make it possible to practice rolling year round. I used to do a bit of rolling in the summer, making slow progress. All this would go out the window in November, aka brain freeze month. Somewhere in spring, I would start all over again. I wanted to find a way to keep rolling through the colder months, retaining the skills I had built up through the summer.

    Is it working? Well, I was out paddling Indian Arm on Thursday. At the end of the day, I tightened up the hood and did a few rolls. The water (and the air for that matter) was very cold. I wish I had taken the time to switch from the light fleece hoodie to the heavy one. I did get a bit of brain freeze through the eye brows. It's possible to bring the hood right down in front to deal with that. But, all in all, everything was good. I was dry. I didn't blow any rolls. My form was a little off. I was rushing a bit, likely due to the cold.

    It's been a while since I've blown a roll. If I can carry that through the winter, that's a big step forward.

    The tuilik is now part of my main kit. I took it on all my trips (six, I think) this year. Some of them were in warm weather and some in cold. Thought the tuilik worked well at all times. I still have a dry suit, but I'm not sure how often it will get used.

    The one minor negative I have about Paulo's design involves the use of nylon fabric instead of neoprene. The nylon 'skirt' sags, filling up with water. In cold weather this can be annoying. Basically, you are paddling around with a blob of cold water in your lap. My fix has been to twist the skirt so that the front point is off to the left and the rear edge is off to the right. This tightens the fabric and creates a series of ridges. Water is channeled down the ridges and off the skirt. Voila, no puddle. And, no, I have not noticed a bunch of water flooding in during rolls, so the skirt rand is still properly sealed.

    I haven't tried any other tuilik designs. So, I can't make comparisons. But, I have used Paulo's tuilik for most of this year and find it very comfortable.
     
  2. AM

    AM Paddler

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Vancouver
    Thanks for that review, Layback -- very helfpul.

    My only experience with a tuilik is with the Brooks neoprene design. That's a really specialized garment, too hot and heavy for ordinary paddling, but good for rolling practice or for keeping skinny kids warm on a cold day (my primary use for it). Paulo's breathable tuiliks are attractive because they could presumably be used for actual paddling. Some questions based on your review:

    1) Exactly how do you use it when touring? As your primary overlayer? As a backup?

    2) Do you wear a pfd with it? I ask because I see a lot of photos of people going without pfd when in a tuilik.

    3) Regarding the water pooling, have you ever been in conditions where the skirt has imploded?

    Thanks again for your info.

    Cheers,
    Andrew
     
  3. tmgr

    tmgr Paddler

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2010
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    Location:
    Comox
    I have the Reed Chillcheater tuiliqs, which I really like. chillcheater.com They are made of a lightweight, wind proof,waterproof fabric with some stretch. They come in three styles. The tent style, for Greenland cockpits, one with a fitted spray deck, and a combo style that can fit both. I use them practically all of the time. What I wear underneath depends on the weather and water conditions and the kind of paddling I am doing. Either a drysuit, or Reed aquafleece paddling pants, vest and merino or fleece tops. The aquafleece/tuiliq combo keeps me warm and mostly dry in the summer, even after an hour or more of rolling. In the winter, or in more challenging conditions, I always wear my drysuit underneath. I actually find it comfortable to paddle in most of the time, to me neoprene would be impossible, but not everyone does. Highly recommended...
     
  4. Pawistik

    Pawistik Paddler

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2010
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    Location:
    Saskatoon, SK
    Thanks for the comments on the tuilik, I definitely have one of those on my list. I see myself using it in winter over a drysuit in (Saskatchewan) winter, as well as over lighter paddling clothing in summer, depending on water temperatures. I am probably/hopefully doing a 10 day or so trip on a northern Saskatchewan lake next summer (Reindeer Lake, it's massive and chock-a--block full of islands and bays, except for the wide open parts). The weather and water in August will be too warm for a drysuit, but of course I still want good protection. I was thinking a tuilik might just be the way to go, combined with clothing that makes swimming comfortable.

    Cheers,
    Bryan
     
  5. Layback

    Layback Paddler

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
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    Location:
    Burnaby, BC
    I was really tempted to buy a Reed Chillcheater tuilik. My name is Reed, so having my name splashed across the tuilik would have been perfect!

    Definitely cannot see paddling in a neoprene tuilik through the summer. Would have to repeatedly roll to blow off heat. Mind you, that would be a good way to improve technique.

    AM 1) I wear the tuilik all the time. As Paulo points out on his website, when conditions allow in hot weather, the hood can be pushed back, venting heat around the neck. I find the tuilik more comfortable in heat than my dry suit. The only caveat I would add to this, is that getting the hood up in place is easier with two hands. Also tightening the strap at the back is a one handed operation, but the chin strap requires two hands. So, thinking ahead is a good idea. If conditions are slowly getting rougher, raise the hood into place while it is still easy to do so. Don't wait until you might need the hood to consider raising it.

    AM 2) I have been wearing the rigid pfd. I have a North Water Pfd Vest, which goes over a pfd and adds pockets. It can't be worn over an inflatable pfd. I want the added pockets for my GPS and small camera, so by default I have used the rigid pfd. I have tried the inflatable pfd over the tuilik. It is really very comfortable. If I come up with another storage option, such as a deck bag, for my GPS and camera, I might switch over to the inflatable design.

    AM 3) No. I have had water rolling across the deck, but, nothing like a big wave crashing down onto the skirt. It is held onto the cockpit rim by a heavy stretch cord, which can be tightened.

    Hope that helps.
     
  6. Man in qajaq

    Man in qajaq Paddler

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2014
    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Victoria, Vacouver Island
    I own the comfort paddling tuilik (waterproof breathable nylon) as well as the Brookes tuilik (neoprene ).
    I use Paulo's tuilik regularly for paddling year round. I find it comfortable wearing it I with either inflatable or a rigid PFD.
    i find theneoprene tuilik is only comfortable for cooler temp. too hot for most of the year. it is great if only going out for a rolling session. there are some rolls that are easier since it provides a little more flotation than the nylon tuilik. I find it too bulky for wearing a pfd with it so only wear it when having a rolling session.
    I find Paulo's tuilik a more versatile paddling garment. he also offer pants that can be used with the tuilik to offer a nearly dry combination if you wet exit.
    if cosidering a tuilik please be advised that they are not an equivalent to a dry suit. they keep you dry while rolling but not if you need to swim.
    some wear dry suits beneath their tuilik but I find that uncomfortable.
    if wearing a dry suit and want to roll year round, get yourself a surfers hood. they work great.
    hope that helps