Varnish

Blackhawk

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May 27, 2020
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I'm getting to that point. Recommendations on type? I've seen recommended:

Petit 1015 Captains varnish

Petit 2015 Flagship varnish

Interlux Schooner varnish

My priorities in order:
1. Ease of use. I'm a beginner.
2. Finish.
3. Cost.
 

Kayak Jim

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Mar 5, 2016
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Comox Valley BC
I used the Captain's Varnish and was satisfied with it. It has stood up remarkably well. Both the Pettit products are listed as "easy to apply". I didn't need the "highest level of UV protection" of the Flagship as my boat isn't exposed to the elements 24/7. And the Captain's is more middle ground price wise.
 

Blackhawk

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New York
I used the Captain's Varnish and was satisfied with it. It has stood up remarkably well. Both the Pettit products are listed as "easy to apply". I didn't need the "highest level of UV protection" of the Flagship as my boat isn't exposed to the elements 24/7. And the Captain's is more middle ground price wise.
Thanks.
About how much do you think is needed? I'm thinking 4 coats? Is a gallon overkill? 17' Arctic Tern.
 

Oldpro

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Jan 21, 2006
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Placitas, New Mexico, USA
I used Flagship on all three of my boats. Probably didn't need the ultimate in UV protection when I lived on Puget Sound, but here in New Mexico I surely do. Now if the recreational boating sites would open up, I could actually do some paddling....
 

Blackhawk

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Realistically I only have until late October to still use it this year. It gets cold enough here that the Hudson is often frozen solid. 1/4 through sanding. Then varnish, finish the seat, hardware, and done.
Part of me just wants to do another fill coat when I'm done sanding and just use it until the weather turns bad. Disadvantages? Should I just be patient? I also saw a Guillemont video where they only varnish the deck. Good compromise?
 

JohnAbercrombie

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Victoria, BC
Part of me just wants to do another fill coat when I'm done sanding and just use it until the weather turns bad. Disadvantages? Should I just be patient?
When you are finished sanding and have a matte epoxy surface ready for varnish, there's no point adding more epoxy fill. It will just add more weight IMO.
You can add a couple of thin coats of varnish (If I have to varnish, I use a good stiff varnish brush, a soft brush lays down a too-thick coat IMO) in a day or two and then do the deck rigging and get on the water. Next winter (assuming you have a warm-ish shop) you can strip the deck rigging and work on adding more varnish. Hopefully by then you will have some scratches in that boat!
Warning: I'm not a 'work of art' guy; I'm a 'it's just a boat' guy! :)
 

Blackhawk

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The basement temperature is pretty consistent- high 60s to low 70s.
I think I will do your suggestion. Just frustrating to be sanding while boats are zipping up and down the Hudson within my view.
 

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Blackhawk

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When you are finished sanding and have a matte epoxy surface ready for varnish, there's no point adding more epoxy fill. It will just add more weight IMO.
You can add a couple of thin coats of varnish (If I have to varnish, I use a good stiff varnish brush, a soft brush lays down a too-thick coat IMO) in a day or two and then do the deck rigging and get on the water. Next winter (assuming you have a warm-ish shop) you can strip the deck rigging and work on adding more varnish. Hopefully by then you will have some scratches in that boat!
Warning: I'm not a 'work of art' guy; I'm a 'it's just a boat' guy! :)
:thumbsup::thumbsup:

Post launch pictures, please!

Enjoy your new boat, and paddle safely!
I will be taking some lessons and discuss limits with the instructor. Also, I grew up wearing PFDs while sailing and will do so kayaking.
 

Blackhawk

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May 27, 2020
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Frustrating. I can see a little glass on the hull. This is that 1” where the deck meets the side panel and is on the side panel. Need another fill coat on the strip? If so, my thought was to finish sanding, fill coat the side again. After it has cured to where it is hard, tape off the side panel and varnish the deck. Once that's done, sand the upper side panel again, then varnish the side/keel.
Thoughts?
 

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JohnAbercrombie

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If it were my project, I would leave it as-is and keep moving forward.

Look at a factory glass boat - most of them have a real 'lump' where the seam tape is laid on the outside of the hull in a thick coat of gelcoat.
 

Blackhawk

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If it were my project, I would leave it as-is and keep moving forward.

Look at a factory glass boat - most of them have a real 'lump' where the seam tape is laid on the outside of the hull in a thick coat of gelcoat.
Thanks!! I'll drive on and leave it for a winter project if it still bothers me.
 

Oldpro

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I usually apply three coats of varnish along the sheer and then place the colored tape. I then apply coat after coat of varnish to the deck and the hull (not over the tape) to use up the whole can. I've found that trying to save Flagship varnish can lead to a color change over time. The vinyl tape doesn't need the protection of varnish. Rolling and tipping off is pretty economical; I think I've managed 5 coats on the hull and maybe a half dozen on the deck from a 1-qt can.
 

JohnAbercrombie

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Is the tape basic black 'electrical' PVC tape or a different product?
I have trouble keeping tape on my paddle shafts, nothing seems to stick for very long.
I don't know if it's just water or salt water that's the problem.
 

Oldpro

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I've used an automotive trim tape (can't remember the brand; last roll I bought was 13 years ago). It's also used to trim fiberglass boats and it stands up extremely well to UV, salt and fresh water. It's available in a variety of widths and colors, and comes (came) in a 50' foot roll.
Enough to do both sides of a 17' kayak with plenty to spare. Only a few dollars a roll--probably still less than ten bux.
 
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