Waters Dancing Anuri-16 Build

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by eriktheviking, Jul 5, 2009.

  1. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    After seeing some wood kayaks on a trip to the Gulf Islands I decided to build one for myself. I chose the Anuri-16 from "Waters Dancing" in Edmonton as I was intrigued by a hard chined boat and I wanted to support a small Canadian outfit.
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    I never took shop classes in High School and my construction abilities are fairly limited. When I was a kid I built balsa wood airplanes, which was about the limit of my craft experience. The instruction manual from Waters Dancing is quite extensive (nearly 150 pages in total) and Don available on the phone or email when needed.
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    One nice feature of the Waters Dancing boats is the wood seat that Don has developed. It is also used as an educational tool in the build- you can try the build techniques out on the seat before tackling the more visible hull and deck pieces. Another feature of these boats is the asymmetrical puzzle joint used to join the panels, so it is not possible to misalign the pieces. The inside of each panel joint gets a piece of fiberglass epoxied on and it is ready to go.

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  2. DarenN

    DarenN Paddler

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    i'm looking forward to watching your build, Erik. i've heard good things about Don and his kayaks.

    Daren.......
     
  3. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    The build is a fairly standard stitch and glue, using bare copper wire supplied in the kit. One feature of the Anuri is the bottom panel that gives a flatter bottom on the hull than with the Pygmy Arctic Tern. The large hull panels of the hard chine boat require quite a lot of stress on the panels, and I had a struggle to get the bow panels pulled in. I had to add quite a few extra stitch holes, and had lots of broken stitches before the wood complied. It was a relief to find that the panels lined up very well. The hull is built around a set of seven bulkhead forms, of which three will be used in the final product.

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    After the hull is stitched together and checked for alignment (I wish I had heard about the laser pointer idea in retrospect) the hull panel joints are epoxied, and several strategic pieces of fiberglass taped are placed in reinforcement positions inside the hull. Some generous epoxy fillets (thickened with wood dust) smooth out the wood seams inside, adding strength and also some interior comfort.

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    Next the deck panels are loosely stitched together and placed on top of the hull. The deck panels are somewhat fragile as the hatches are already cutout as supplied. The deck is stitched to the hull and made to conform to the bulkheads in place. There is no cutout behind the cockpit, so there is some torturing of the wood here to make the transition. I built a large clamp from 2x2's, steel wire and foam to bring down the deck panel behind the cockpit.



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  4. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    Once the deck is in the right shape, its seams are epoxied and then it is carefully removed so it can be reinforced on the inside using fillets and a set of fiberglass tapes. The inside of the deck that is not taped gets coated and tipped off with epoxy.

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    Another butterflies-inducing step is putting on the hull exterior fiberglass. In the Waters Dancing manual, it is laid on the sanded but otherwise bare wood. There seems to be some semi-religious battle about he relative virtues of applying fabric to primed vs bare wood. I did not have any trouble with this step in the end, aside from fiddling with the fabric at the bow and stern.
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    After curing the exterior, it was time to glass the hull interior. I had to use two overlapping pieces at this point. I wish someone had warned me about how hard it is to remove masking tape from the bare fiberglass, which I had used to keep the two pieces lined up.

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  5. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    There was some additional epoxying to do. A 4" wide keel strip goes along most of the length, and then a set of additional decreasing width strips on the bow and stern of the hull. I opted for the maximum suggested- 6 on the bow and 4 on the stern. I also added an additional strip along the prominent panel joints bow and stern as this seemed a likely location for hitting things in the water.

    I did an end pour on the stern in case I ever decide to add a rudder (unlikely but easier to do now). A fill at the bow is aided by a styrofoam insert that is cut into rough shape to fill most f the volume .

    At this point the deck is put back onto the hull for the final time. I had the front bulkhead moved up from its former position, and as it turned out I probably should have moved it another inch at least- the cockpit is probably not long enough for a paddler much taller than me. Two bulkheads are positioned just behind the cockpit, so that a day hatch can be placed just behind the paddler. A support strut is placed under the rear deck so that it is strong enough for self rescues and such. Then it is time to put the deck back in place.

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    Inevitably things had moved a bit since the previous fitting, so some stitches were required to pull things into alignment. I also needed my "big clamp" again to pull the deck down behind the cockpit. A putty knife was very useful to get the edges to meet up just right all the way around. Some straight epoxy held the deck in place, removed the stitches and then a generous fillet of thickened epoxy sealed it up.

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  6. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    The deck fiberglass was laid over top and trimmed to hang just below the hull seam. Electrical tape 1" below the seam with the hull marked the extent of the deck glass overlap on the hull. This was trimmed along the tape a short while after applying the epoxy so it had thickened a little. The trickiest thing was keeping the wet epoxy from lifting up around the sharp corner from deck to hull. Finally it looked good and I watched for drips for a while but it was late. The next morning I was greeted with extensive drip lines down onto the hull from the deck so I was in for a lot of rough sanding here.

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    There was a lot of sanding to do, removing the drip lines and especially feathering the epoxy strips along the deck seam and bow and stern reinforcements. Under the hatches, additional reinforcement was added. The only cutout to do was for the optional day hatch. Since this part of the deck is curved, the hole is a bit tricky to cut and it requires some thickened epoxy to build up a flat-ish structure that the day hatch fits onto. The worst job was adding the interior strip along the hull-deck seam- I am a pretty big guy and fitting through the hatch holes was tough.

    One problem right at the end. Some sort of blockage developed in my epoxy pump dispenser so the mix was incorrect. This coincided with fixing the coaming to the deck. After two days the epoxy was still putty-like. I ended up scraping out the epoxy and replacing it with a good batch. In the end all seemed fine- it could have been worse (bad batch during wetting out the hull for example). Final epoxy coats an more sanding gave a pretty smooth finish. The hull bottom got special epoxy/graphite coatings. The only issue here was a somewhat pronounced ridge between the regular hull and the graphite coated region once the edging tape was removed- not sure how this could be transitioned better. I opted for a Z-spar varnish finish on the rest of the hull and deck as the application seemed more straightforward than the LPU. Perhaps when I refinish it in a few years I will try the LPU.

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  7. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    Although I had mounted the foot braces, I ended up removing them for now as my feet are close to the front bulkhead. I will probably add some velcro-ed minicell foam here for a bit of firm cushion. I drilled out holes for the deck hardware- opting for straightforward bolt fittings (backed by large washers) and using Marine Goop for sealing. The hatches are sealed by closed cell foam padding but I will probably replace this soon as I don't find the seal firm enough- trying out some wet exits and self rescues had too much water getting in. This would also be improved by adding half dowels to the covers to increase the downward force.

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    I finished the final trimmings on the Labour Day 2008 weekend. It turned out to be a very wet September. I actually drove out to the lake twice during letups in the rain, only to have it start hard again by the time I got there. Not wanting my first paddle to be too miserable I waited and did get out on Purden Lake for a first run.

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  8. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Wow. That's the fastest build that I've every seen. :wink:

    Nice job, and welcome to the site.

    *****
     
  9. Tootsall

    Tootsall Paddler

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    Wow...time-lapse photography! :D

    Erik, what did you use to obtain the contrast colour in the shear-deck panels? (paint, stain, type, etc.)

    Any estimate of the manhours it actually took you?

    Now that you've had a chance to get it out and on the water, how do you like it?

    Nice job.
     
  10. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    Yeah- I didn't discover this site until just a few weeks ago so I did my build without the benefit of all the wisdom stored here.
     
  11. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    I used a water based wood stain (Saman walnut) for the deck contrast. I tested it on some scrap before using it.

    I did not track the hours (it was certainly way more than the 90 hours)- I spent a lot of time fiddling around and deciding that I needed another tool or something. I was often wandering up and down the aisles at Home Depot. Also I was not very good at figuring out which tasks could safely be done in parallel. I started in November and finished in late August but there was a 4 month stretch that I hardly touched it (XC ski season in central BC). Since I was building it in the basement, it was actually nice and cool to go work on it in the summer.

    It does seem like a nice boat- very rapid acceleration and tracks nicely. I have found it does weathercock somewhat, but that might be more due to my larger than average frame. So far there is no temptation to add a rudder. It has great secondary stability so it can lean way over.

    The weight is pretty good- I have not weighed it but it is easy to cartop and I only bring my cart if I need to haul it more than a couple hundred meters- otherwise I can carry it on my shoulder.
     
  12. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Ah, but now you have your own wisdom that you can share with others. :wink:

    *****
     
  13. hairymick

    hairymick Paddler

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    :shock:

    WOW! Eric, Welcome aboard mate.

    That is a beautiful boat and the build superb.

    Could you please post more detail on your seat build and in particular, how you did the back band?

    Enquiring minds want to know. :D
     
  14. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    Hi Mick,

    The seat is one nice feature on Don's Waters Dancing boats. It is made to be removable as a unit, held in place by some tabs fixed on the bottom of the hull.

    The seat itself is made of a set of precut okume pieces that form the nice seat shape when stitched tight together- a really nice design. The seat back is a single okume piece that is curved by being attached to a precut backing piece. Both the seat and back are laminated with fiberglass and epoxy, and the back angle can be adjusted with a cord and lock fitting.

    You can see the seat piece layout at http://www.watersdancing.com/ToolsAndManuals.shtml and some photos at http://www.watersdancing.com/Waters_Dancing_Innovations.shtml#Choosing your Waters Dancing kit if you scroll down a bit. I padded mine differently than in Don's photo- I have an inflatable seat cushion velcro-ed in and closed cell foam on the back (NSI Seat Padz).

    Regards,
    Erik
     
  15. hairymick

    hairymick Paddler

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    Thanks for the links mate.

    Real nice looking boats there. :cool.

    Oh deah, I can feel the need for another epoxy fix coming on :D