WHERE DID YOU PADDLE? - February 2008

Discussion in 'Trip Reports' started by Dan_Millsip, Feb 3, 2008.

  1. Maddie

    Maddie Paddler

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Messages:
    148
    Yesterday, my dad and I went for a 17km paddle from the put-in at Fort Langley to Barnston Island. Here are some of the pictures that my dad took.


    Me, a little ways into our paddle at the end of Bedford Channel just before the main arm of the Fraser.
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    A group of canoeists paddle past us with big smiles on their faces.
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    Taking a look back at Mount Baker.
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    A view of the beach at Derby Reach Park.
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    Some boat houses.
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    Me, paddling towards the construction site of the new bridge at 200th St.
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    A closer look at the bridge. Notice me paddling in front of it!
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    A look across the water, to the other side of the bridge.
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    It was a great day, which finished with a pool session later that night.
     
  2. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Messages:
    9,305
    Location:
    Beautiful BC
    Rich, nice photos! I especially like these ones:

    *****
     
  3. RichardH

    RichardH Paddler

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    138
    Thanks, Dan! I'm psyched just to be out on the water - the photos are the icing on the cake. :) Speaking of pics I couldn't get enough of, thanks for the great galleries on Indian Arm and D'arcy Island- just a fantastic photos of places I desperately want to visit by kayak (in due time, of course).

    -Rich
     
  4. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

    Joined:
    May 31, 2005
    Messages:
    5,666
    Location:
    Astoria, Oregon, USA
    Got out on the water yesterday. This was the result:

    Aldrich Point. Woody Island. Connections to the Past.

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    Pink. Fiberglass. Insulation. What's this stuff doing inside the cockpit of my main machine kayak? Oh, yeah, that big storm back in December with all the high winds. Must have released a bunch through the access panel to the attic, above the boat. Vacuum. Vacuum. Gotta be clean for the first paddle in ... ahhhh ... five months??!! Ooof. Those boats I saw yesterday on the float when I returned Surf Scoter to her trailer got me thinking about paddling. So, today I went. Aldrich Point, my fave launch spot hereabouts. Entry to the islands, to the main channel of the Columbia, twenty miles from the mouth.

    Stretch, reach, hump that boat over to the water. What's this funny bump under the neoprene? Must be too much pizza and beer. Oh, well, it all floats, no? A little breeze down the river as I slide the drytop on. At least that still fits. Slick, slick, slide, slide into the water. Move those muscles. Shit, this feels good! More fun than riding the random orbital sander express, or hooting along the epoxy wagon. Boat building is fun, sometimes mental work, but paddling is holistic food, for the mind, the body, the senses and the fingers.

    Across the channel to Tronsen, around its top, stroking down with the tail of the ebb, chasing scaups off the water, eyeballing herons on stumps. Nobody but me. All the duck hunters are gone, and it is freaking, stuff-busting, beautiful out here! Clear, open water, easy paddling, a few mild eddies to bridge, coasting along and checking out the inbound freighter and downbound tug, nattering at each other, "port to port, cap!" as they pass head to head, the odd small open skiff skittering like a water bug along the Washington shore, making that gnat noise.

    I slide ashore on Woody, my summer beach for noshing and sunning. In winter, it is a view spot for the other side, a mile distant, across calm, almost glassy water, windshields winking in the sun as fishers hunt ironheads over there. It is all in alders and second growth, concealing a hundred years of history, canneries gone, fish wheels disappeared, an entire small village bulldozed and burnt to make way for a log dump. One red-roofed set of old buildings a mile or two downstream still shines in the sun, where Chinese filleters, Slav gill netters, and Scandinavian oarsmen worked salmon runs in the early part of the twentieth century, a hit or miss way of life, with mortality an everyday reality.

    On my side, horses hauled seine nets onto the sands, so burly armed guys could toss big hogs (chinook salmon) into hoppers for the same canneries.

    This stuff is all gone, gone, gone, replaced by chi-chi float houses, decked out in fresh siding and blue-fluided Marine Sanitation Devices ... heaven forfend any human poop add to the huge volumes of otter, fish, nutria, and duck poop already here. A long-sunk ferry which used to ply the route from Astoria to Washington is under me as I glide by the float houses, each permitted and now a high value item for yuppies and the odd crawdad gatherer.

    The twigs quiver in the tide, and part when I move through them, geese scattering before me, swans and scaups and mallards making quiet noises in the distance, a panoply of satisfying, healing sounds. Better than any therapy at the hands of man.

    Kids toss rocks at pilings, squirting back and forth on their bikes along the dike on my return, to a deserted ramp, empty parking lot, bare beach, all slightly dented and scratched by the day's visitors, one intermittent mole route at tide's edge. Hope that guy can swim in there -- here comes the water!

    I'm done here, put back together, quieter, calmer, ready for rest.
     
  5. waverider

    waverider Paddler

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Messages:
    671
    Location:
    langley
    Maddie wrote :
    Me, paddling towards the construction site of the new bridge at 200th St.


    A closer look at the bridge. Notice me paddling in front of it!


    A look across the water, to the other side of the bridge.



    Pretty impressive cranes eh Maddie, the tallest one stands 80 meters above sea level (thats 240 or so feet ?) ( and people ask me why I turned down the job offer from them lol ) The lift capabilities are awsome, lifting re-bar cages in the 40 ton range is not uncommon for them.

    At a rental cost around the 30 g's a month they better be able to perform.

    Here is a link if you wanna watch them in action

    http://www.goldenearsbridge.ca/code/navigate.php?Id=1