WHERE DID YOU PADDLE? October 2006

Discussion in 'Trip Reports' started by glock, Oct 2, 2006.

  1. glock

    glock Paddler

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    Got up early and paddled out to the Little Group off of Sidney to do some habitat restoration in the Golf Island Marine Park with Fester. First stop was one of the Little Group Islet's where Fester climbed out of his boat and up onto the top of the rocky islet. Once on top he smashed one of those stupid inukshuts that more and more people are building.

    What happened to Leave no trace?

    Next up was Dock Island and it was my turn. I must admit to a certain boyish joy in smashing these things down. In the old days I would have shot them to pieces. But I'm now more carefull about what I shoot up. :lol:

    Maybe one of our American friends could sneak in some of those bomb bursting in air 4th of July pyrotechnics and we could go about the islands blasting these things back into the stone age. :twisted:

    Why do people feel compelled to build these inukshuts? Unless it's above 60°N and you are an Inuit there is no need to build these things. To my way of thinking these people, back in the urban environment, would be little more then graffity vandals.

    Building these things is the very same as carving intials into a tree.

    After the smash up we headed back, checked in on John's Passage, flat calm. And finished with some rolls and stuff at Sidney. I tryed to do a somersault reentry, something I use to be able to do in a wet suit, my first attempted ended with about 60 Lbs of air trapped in the legs of my dry suit. Think of the Micheline man, stuck upside down in a kayak.:lol: The weather was great and the sense that we'd done some important work to preserve the environment warmed me right through - for about 20 minutes.

    You know, if there was a militant arm of the environmental movement, I could get used to being green.
    Glock
     
  2. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Somersault reentry? What's that?

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  3. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    thanks for that.
    these things are a blot on any natural landscape and turn my stomach as well. i break them down (whenever i feel that it is safe, heh heh) as well.
     
  4. Kasey

    Kasey Paddler

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    Thanks Glock, never thought of that....I've only built one near the top of a mountain (where 4X4s frequent so I don't feel as bad) and I do agree totally with the "no trace" principle so thanks for making me think!
    A Reformed Inukshuck Builder :oops:
     
  5. glock

    glock Paddler

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    With your kayak upside down place your paddle next to the cock pit coaming on the side you like to roll up on. Get the paddle oriented as if you are setting up for a roll. I'll come back to that in a moment.

    Next take a breath go under and resurface with your head inside the cock pit. There's lots of stale air in there to breathe. Don't do this if you eat a lot of beans.

    Turn your head to face the stern. You should be able to kiss the seat back. Firmly grip the coaming. Your strong side hand will have to hold both the coaming and your paddle.

    Take a deep breath of that stale air. Now start a backward somersault, as your legs and feet pass over your head and between your arms they will slip right into the cockpit. Of course now your head is totally submerged. Skirm and wiggle your but into place, grab the paddle with both hands, and initiate whatever roll you prefer and up you pop.

    Folks with good breath control can even attach the spray deck to minimize the amount of water that gets captured in the cockpit as the kayak rolls underneath the kayaker. I've never done that part, but I use to be able to somersault into and roll my Arctic Tern. Last Sunday was a disaster due to too much air trapped in the dry suit (I forgot to burp after a pee break) and on the 2nd attempted I smacked the back of my head into the keyhole section of the coaming and started to laugh even harder which lead to total chaos.

    Glock
     
  6. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    That summersault reentrly sounds like it would be a lot of fun -- but I'll hold off on trying it until I get my roll down pat first. 8)

    Last weekend I took my youngest daughter out to Buntzen Lake for her first paddle in her own boat.

    The boat is a Perception Acadia Scout and unlike most rec boats, this boat is a miniature sea kayak that's ten feet long and 23 inches wide. Needless to say, my daughter absolutely loves this kayak -- she was zipping all over the place and had a blast.

    Over the past several weeks, I've had both of my daughters out in kayaks by themselves and it certainly is quite enjoyable. It's been a lot of fun in the double for the past several years but watching them paddle off and explore on their own is certainly rewarding.

    For those who might be wondering, the paddle is a Werner that is specifically designed for kids and has a smaller diameter fiberglass shaft and plastic blades.

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  7. Dex

    Dex Paddler

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    Re: Where did you paddle in October 2006

    No its not. I do not condone these things but carving your initials into a tree is quite a bit more permanent and destructive than piling up rocks.
     
  8. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Perhaps the inukshuk topic needs it's own thread? Oh wait, there already is one called "Leave no trace?" in the General Discussions forum. :roll:

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  9. Dex

    Dex Paddler

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    Well it is glock's thread he should be able to brink up inukshuks if he wishes, IMO.
     
  10. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    He already brought it up in another thread that he started -- I really don't think we need inukshuk discussion in every thread. :roll:

    Where did you paddle last weekend Dex?

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  11. Dex

    Dex Paddler

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    I thought it was Fester that started the other thread.

    Jen and I paddled out along the breakwater throwing out a fishing rod hoping we dont catch a 30 pound lingcod like the boat beside us. 8O it was too windy anyway so we headed for home after 1.5 hours. probablly wont be able to get out again till next Thursday :cry:
     
  12. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    You're correct -- it was. But we still don't need more than one thread to discuss inukshuks. Since the other thread was started first, it will remain the official unofficial thread for discussing inukshuks and other man-made stone objects.

    Was that 30 lb lingcod caught from a kayak?

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  13. Dex

    Dex Paddler

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    Nope it was from a 25 foot motorboat. If it wasn't so windy I wouldn't have minded the challenge. The windsock at the heliport was horizontal so it was at least 15 knots though I would guess it was around 17 knots gusting in the low 20's occassionally. I felt guilty watching Jen paddle to keep us from blowing away while i was reclinining with a rod out jigging for cod so we played around a bit and left.
     
  14. kayakwriter

    kayakwriter Paddler

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    Peddle, Paddle, Peddle

    So just for the challenge of it, I did a door-to-door self-propelled trip this past week. Loaded my bike and bike trailer with my camping gear, rode it down to the English Bay boathouse, took out my kayak, locked up bike and trailer, and paddled out to Gambier Island in Howe Sound. I faced wind and some great waves getting out to Point Akinson on Wendesday - some of the larger swell sets would have surfed me backwards if I hadn't had forward momentem.
    Once I'd rounded the corner into Queen Charlotte Channel, I put up one sail and did some of my boldest (if not brightest) sailing ever, with the swells coming in on the port beam. Twenty minutes later, the wind died and the water was like a millpond. Got to Halkett Bay Provinical Park at 17:30.
    Spent a couple of days hiking on Gambier. Sadly the trail up to the top of Mount Arbatan is now blocked about a third of the way up by logging slash.
    Came back yesterday. Got some assistance from the wind coming south down Queen Charlotte Channel, but things really kicked in nicely once I'd rounded Point Atkinson again. Put up both sails, and cruised along at speeds of up to 4+ knots, making the return to English Bay in half the time it had taken me on the way out (1.5 hours vs 3) and with no effort. Refueled with french fries from the concession stand, hopped on the bike, and was home for a roast beef supper by 17:30.
     
  15. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Very cool, kayakwriter. 8)

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  16. Duncan2

    Duncan2 Paddler

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    Twin Islands

    This Saturday we went to the Twin Islands. We put in at Belcarra, and went there for a day trip. The weather was just great.

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    We had a latte on the north island with our lunch:

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  17. glock

    glock Paddler

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    Great photos. I foolishly forgot my brand spanking new WP10 Pentax Sunday last but still got out for a great solo paddle along the east reach of the entrance to the Sooke Basin.

    This is one of my favourite places to paddle. The rock gardens are ever changing. Depending on the tide levels, the current speed, sea state and the weather you can find yourself riding through green, black, or double diamond gardens. Sunday the gardens were a benign green which gave me lots of opportunity to practice control strokes without having to deal with the adrenaline rush and fear that the next swell is going to throw the kayak up that barnacle encrusted wall.

    Still I managed to mark more then a few rocks with gell coat.

    Just after launching I inadvertently approached a river otter. I was drifting in the current but was up wind of the otter sunning himself just out of site on a jetty. I saw him first and was amazed at the size of the guy. He was a big as a fat dog. For a moment I thought he might be a sea otter, until he spotted me and a got a look at the distinctive river otter tail as he scampered into the water.

    From there on I paddled into and ever brightening sky, peace and a real nice sense of serenity that lasted right through until my return to work on Monday. On the outbound section I came across a lone male sea lion playing and fishing along the ebbing current line. He was blissfully lost in his own world and I don't think was even aware of my passing.

    later on I managed to get through some of the surge channels that are almost always impassable due to either low water or seas that are just nuts. On the return trip the sea lion was still there only this time he was surrounded by a band of screaming gulls looking for a free lunch. The lion had a huge salmon that he kept tossing in the air and ripping great chunks from. Each toss would bring down the gulls. He'd swallowa bite then rip in again and make another toss. All this was happening about 15 metres from me. He kept flicking his head in such a manner that the distance between us remained constant. I'd stopped paddling to watch. Then with the last flick he change his head rotation and the salmon landed about three metres from my kakak. I sat stunned as this huge half salmon came sailing in toward my boat. The slap of the sea lions fins brought me back to reality and I hit the accelerator to put some distance between dinner and me.

    Back at the put in I finished the day with both on and off side rolls, a re-entry and roll, high and low braces, and finally with my first half paddle roll. I've taught myself how to do this be grasping the full paddle as though it's already broken. Doing this gave me an out. Should the attempt fail I only needed to slide my in board hand back to its normal position, set up, and roll. After two successful rolls I broke the paddle apart and popped up using only half the paddle.

    I finished feeling just fine.

    Glock
     
  18. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    this last sunday, after a few wks of initially of days in bed, to crutches, to cane, to careful hobbling, I slowly placed the small blakyak on the edge of a nice gentle section of the thompson river.

    the sunlight sparkling off the burbling water seemed so friendly and thus after about 10 minutes of trepidation, I timidly slid off the shore into the slow current.

    and 10 minutes later as I began to breathe more normally, the sun shone, the air was warm, the water gentle and rippling, the trees blazed and shouted out in a kaleidoscope of vibrant colours . . . .

    just getting out is sometimes all that counts.


    .
     
  19. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Nice photos Duncan2 -- looks like you and your partner are getting lots of good use out of your new kayaks.

    Glock, too bad you didn't have your camera for the otter -- I once had a fantastic similar opportunity to photograph a beaver -- but my camera was not with me. :cry: Sounds like you had a terrrific paddle though. :D

    I was fortunate to have paddled at two locations this past weekend.

    I took my daughters to Hicks Lake (just east of Harrison Lake) on Sunday afternoon to do some car camping. The three of us put on wetsuits and paddled around most of the lake and then the girls played around in the kayaks in the bay beside the campsite. It was a lot of fun watching them fooling around -- they got into a match of throwing their paddles like harpoons and then used their hands to propel themselves to retrieve the paddles. After tiring of that activity, they started seeing how far they could tip their boat before falling over -- that was fun! My youngest daughter finally flipped over (and laughed about it) -- at that point, I figured it would be a good time to teach a T-rescue. We had so much fun doing the rescue that the girls kept flipping over so that they could do more rescues. The girls continued playing and laughing until it was dark when they got out of their wet gear and warmed up beside a fire with big smiles.

    On Monday morning we got up, had breakfast and drove to Harrison Lake where we met up with friends to do a paddle down the Harrison River. We started at the boat launch at Harrison and paddled west across the bottom of the lake to the river opening. Paddling down the Harrison is quite nice. It's an absolutely georgeous picturesque area. We paddled 22 km to Kilby Provincial Park where we had a vehicle parked to shuttle us back to Harrison to retrieve our other vehicles. There were lots of spawning salmon in the river -- so many in fact that it was difficult to look down in the water and not see any. There were also lots of dead salmon floating in the river and along the banks. Oh, and the weather couldn't have been any better. :D

    The girls enjoying themselves at Hicks Lake:
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    My youngest daugher taking a moment to lay down on the rear deck of her kayak. Could this be the beginning stages of a future roller?
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    Heading down the Harrison River:
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    We stopped for lunch and saw this crayfish in the shallows along the river:
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    Native pictographs:
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    We hiked up to the top of a bluff and had a most impressive view of the river and valley:
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    This bald eagle hardly flinched as I quietly drifted down the river past it. Note the salmon carcass in the background:
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    Nearing the end of our journey at Kilby Provincial Park:
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  20. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Duncan2 -- I'm just wondering if you know anything about that boat (behind you in the picture) with the wheels on it? Is that your partner's boat? Are the wheels permanently attached to that boat? I'm guessing that they are V-wheels for kayaks strapped to the rear deck?

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