WHERE DID YOU PADDLE? October 2013

Discussion in 'Trip Reports' started by mick_allen, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

    Joined:
    May 15, 2005
    Messages:
    3,069
    On the thanksgiving weekend, went out on the Thompson River in the interior for a few hrs.

    Another kayak on the river:


    Some crows checking out the action below. There were some salmon jumping in a teeny little section of current nearby.


    On the washed away bank you can see the horizontal line of ash (I think) from a volcanic eruption in the 1800s.


    Moseying along:


    Some colour mixed in with a few ducks near the shore.


    Often at this time of year up here, it’s fairly brisk - but today was a very warm, sunny, lazy day. Perfect for some turkey a little later on.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. alexsidles

    alexsidles Paddler

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    285
    Location:
    Seattle WA
    For about the millionth time, I paddled my closest local waters, Union Bay of Lake Washington in Seattle. This is an area that never gets old to me. This time of year, the ducks are finally starting to come back from their northern breeding grounds. I saw Mallard, Gadwall, Wood Duck, Bufflehead, American Wigeon, Northern Pintail, Green-Winged Teal, Ring-Necked Duck, Northern Shoveler, American Coot, Canada Goose, Pie-Billed Grebe, Western Grebe, and Double-Crested Cormorant. Other species will come a little bit later, including the two scaup species, Ruddy Duck, Canvasback, Common Goldeneye, and Hooded Merganser, though this last is already being reported here. There is a chance for passing Snow Geese and Greater White-Fronted Geese as well.

    This might not be a good time of year for multi-day sea kayaking trips, but it sure is a fine time to be out on the lake!





    Alex
     

    Attached Files:

  3. chodups

    chodups Paddler

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Messages:
    963
    Alex,
    I grew up about 6 blocks from here. I still paddle here all the time. I'm surprised we haven't seen each other.
     
  4. alexsidles

    alexsidles Paddler

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    285
    Location:
    Seattle WA
    I grew up about two blocks from Laurelhurst Park (I'm now living in Ballard). Union Bay is still the paddle I do most frequently because it's so close and so beautiful. It would be fun to get together sometime.

    Alex
     
  5. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

    Joined:
    May 31, 2005
    Messages:
    5,666
    Location:
    Astoria, Oregon, USA
    Alex, chodups:

    Spent time late 1960's-early 1970's at UW, paddled Union Bay couple times and ran the nature trails a lot. Alex's photos look like it is still beautiful and serene. Some truly cool backwaters in there. The blackbirds used to dive bomb my bald spot as I ran. Now several could land simultaneously on the fallow scalp up there! :wink: :big_thumb
     
  6. explorer777

    explorer777 Paddler

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2013
    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    Langley BC

    Whereabouts were you? Looks like Kamloops area maybe?
     
  7. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

    Joined:
    May 15, 2005
    Messages:
    3,069
    It was on the South Thompson, right in Kamloops and toward the west.
    I find it very interesting that one can paddle right in an urban area and yet because of the often narrow strip of growth on the water's edge and a paddler's low view lines obscuring the urbanity of it all - how peaceful and 'natural' it can be.
    Same thing on the Fraser River in the lower mainland - one can be right in the middle of heavy population and yet feel and be a thousand miles and years away.
    (mind you, that could just be me . . . sorta out of it anyway, heh heh)
     
  8. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

    Joined:
    May 31, 2005
    Messages:
    5,666
    Location:
    Astoria, Oregon, USA
    Streamside vegetation buffers are mandated many waterways in Oregon when outside urban areas, anyhow. But grazing animals continue to be principal desecrators in the drier part of the state. Educating ranchers to the benefits, along with some subsidies for fencing has helped. In the wet part of Oregon, unless you purposely tame it, shrubby streamside vegetation takes over, best red osier dogwood, worst blackberries.

    The shoreline on Mick's stretch looked darn good to me. :)