which pygmy kit

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by wyliewesty, Jan 5, 2009.

  1. wyliewesty

    wyliewesty Paddler

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    I am going to buy a pygmy kit either a Coho hi, Artic turn hi, or qcxl. My weight is 250.#'s, 6'4" tall and shoe size 11. I have no experience kayaking and this kayak will be used mostly for day paddling and camping trips lasting 3-5 days.
    I contacted pygmy and have been told that any of these boats I mentioned would be good for me. Is there anyone here my size that has experience with either the coho hi or artic turn hi. Out of the 3 boats I prefeer the look of the coho but am not 100% convinced that it will work good for someone my size and experience. Any advice would be great .
    Thank's,
    Bill
     
  2. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Bill,

    Could be that some butt time in a "high volume" boat would help you quite a bit as far as deciding how comfortable you would be in any kayak. The QCXL is probably the best fit for you presently ... but as time goes on, you might decide the Coho HV is more fun.

    I've paddled a QCXL, and traveled with a guy about your size for a couple longer trips (1-2 weeks) who loved his. It is a cargo barge ... but I'm 5-10, 220 lbs, with size 9 feet, and I suspect the Coho HV is about right for me and my style of paddling. If I were larger and heavier, not so sure about the Coho HV. I paddled the regular Coho once, long ago, and found it a very nice boat, but it is a bit smaller than the boat I have used for over 10 years.

    If your main use were only day trips, I'd recommend the Coho HV. But, considering you plan on longer trips, I think the QCXL would be the best, safest bet.

    Oh, I think the Tern is too small, even in the HV version.
     
  3. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Dave, I'm a bit um, larger than you and I have no problem fitting into my standard sized Coho. I suspect the high volume Coho would fit wylie with no problem. Pygmy tells me that the Coho HV will accomodate someone with size 13+ feet. My son is larger than I am and he can also (just) fit into my Coho.

    Bill, are you anywhere near Pygmy's shop? The best way to find out for sure is to take their boats for a paddle. If not, it's been my experience that the folks at Pygmy are very good at giving advice over the phone regarding which boats will fit you. Personally, I've been very pleased with my Coho and would have no problem recommending it (in the HV flavour) to you if you fit it (which seems to be the case).

    *****
     
  4. B1200

    B1200 Paddler

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    I'm a little guy, 5'11 and 170 and last night was the first time I have sat in my Tern. I was crossing my fingers that the build table would hold, because I would have hated to ask Dave how to put the two pieces of the hull back together LOL, but anyways, even the HV version I think would feel pretty small for a really big guy. Now, I also have never paddled a boat, so this is all pretty meaningless info :roll:
     
  5. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    B2100, someone your size should have no problem fitting into the Tern -- I suspect you'll probably even need to pad it out a bit. The HV versions of these boats are a full inch higher -- that's huge.

    *****
     
  6. wyliewesty

    wyliewesty Paddler

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    Im in texas so pygmy is too far away for me to visit for a test paddle. I feel confident that the QCxl would work for my size but really like the looks of the coho and artic turn.
    Do you have any pictures of your friends qcxl from the trip you guys took. Pics of qcxl kayaks are hard to come by and its hard to tell exactly what the boat looks like from the pics I have found.
     
  7. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Yeah, here are a couple shots.

    However, Dan's advice may be a tipping point for you. He is ... ummm ... more substantial than I am, for sure. And if he's comfy in the HV Coho, it might be a better choice for you in the long run. An imponderable here is how agile you are, and adaptable to twisting your body. The primary stability of a QCXL is higher than that of a Coho HV, I think (Dan can give a better opinion on that). The Coho is a sleeker, better performer than the QCXL, so if you want speed over primary stability, you might prefer it.

    Sorry about muddying the waters, but Dan's judgement is pretty good on stuff like this, and he has tested many more boats than I have.

    The fellow who paddled the QCXL is very substantial, and probably more so than Dan.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    This last shot may be a telling one. Curt is heavily loaded here, both because of his own body mass, and because he is carrying a ton of stuff. Yet, the boat is by no means maxed out.

    One last factoid: the QC models are substantially less work to assemble than the Cohos, and somewhat less demanding of kayak building skills, I believe.
     
  8. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Actually Dave, my Coho is not the HV model -- it's the standard model which is smaller than the HV.

    I've never seen the Queen Charlotte models so I can't comment on that boat -- but from what I've read, the boat seems to be well liked amongst those who paddle it.

    *****
     
  9. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Bill,

    Becky and I had a discussion of what Curt weighed when those photos were taken and we think he was edging up toward 300 lbs at that time.

    I think it might be important where a person carries the weight. Curt's is more around his waist, so that the large cockpit rim on a QCXL was important for him.
     
  10. wyliewesty

    wyliewesty Paddler

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    astoriadave, thank's for the pics. I really put alot of time into finding qc pics and they are hard to find. I have found several articals about trips taken with them but few pics.
    Dan, if you dont mind telling me what is your weight and height.
     
  11. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    I'm 5"11" and weigh 230lbs (for now).

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  12. B1200

    B1200 Paddler

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    Aw heck Dan, I lost 30 pounds in under 90 days to get to where im at, hmm...just add another month and you will be right there!
     
  13. Dan_Millsip

    Dan_Millsip Paddler & Admin

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    Actually, I was thinking of putting a few more pounds on. :lol:

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  14. Dana Gustafson

    Dana Gustafson New Member

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    Bill,
    I have been visiting this board for a couple of years now but this is my first post. I am a novice paddler at best and dont have near the paddling or boat building expertise that the regulars of this site have, but I thought I could give you some input to help you choose a boat since I have built seven Pygmy kits over the past several winters, each a different design. I have built an Arctic Tern 17, an Osprey Standard, a Queen Charlotte XL, an Osprey Triple, a Goldeneye Hi, a Coho, and an Osprey 13. All of the kayaks paddle quite differently from one another except for the Osprey Standard and the Goldeneye Hi, which share the same hull. Also, I have not tried to paddle the Osprey 13 because I am too big to get into it. I am 5' 11'' tall, about 240 lbs, and size 11 shoes. All of the full sized Pygmies have plenty of volume to carry my weight and paddle well, although I have never had the opportunity to load them up and go camping, but I think any of them could easily carry a lot of gear even with my weight. Naturally the QSXL and the Goldeneye Hi have the most leg room, but I don't feel cramped in the other boats at all. Over all, the Coho is my favorite of all the boats that I have built. It just seems to have the right combination of speed, tracking, turning, and stability to suit me. I actually think that the QSXL is a little too large, even for someone my size, but it is still an excellent, good paddling boat, turns much quicker than the other boats when leaned, but is more affected by the wind. Good luck in choosing your boat. All the Pygmies are great!
    Dana
     
  15. oldsailor

    oldsailor Paddler

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    That sounds like a lot of building experience to me. :)

    Before I got the mothership bug I had given a lot of thought to building the Osprey Triple. At about 60 lbs this is probably one of the lightest triple kayaks out there. A triple makes a valuable safety boat for a group because an incapacitated paddler can always be put in the middle cockpit and it makes a valuable load carrier for a group because of its capacity.

    But I've never paddled an Osprey Triple (or built one) and even though it's unlikely now that I'll put one together, I'd like your impressions of the build and how the boat paddles.

    Craig
     
  16. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Craig, I'll jump in on that Osprey Triple ... although I built the Double: Same hull, just different distribution of cockpits, and no center hole. I paddled both before I opted for the Double. We liked them both, but the Double won out for three reasons:

    1. The bow paddler is waaay out front, and would have a much rougher, wetter ride.

    2. Weight distribution is skewed toward the ends ... each cockpit being 8-10 inches closer to its respective end.

    2 (And this was the deal-killer.) Significantly less dry storage, because that 8-10 inches of shift for each cockpit cut into the roomiest part of each bulkheaded compartment, leaving the Triple with about as much dry storage as an average single!

    Doubles have less dry storage per paddler than singles, anyway, so the Triple really suffers. We paddled the Double quite a bit before I sold it (one of my worst decisions ever!) and liked it. For multiday tripping, we had to deck-load in the center to make it work for us, stashing the tent and two bulky sleeping pads there to free up space in the ends.

    Becky really liked its light weight for carrying, as did I. It is not as fast as the CD Libra XT (we own one -- a replacement for the Pygmy), but plenty fast enough.
     
  17. Dana Gustafson

    Dana Gustafson New Member

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    Craig,
    I believe the Osprey Triple was the fourth Pygmy kayak that I built and it went together quite easily just like the others, but it sure is big. The reason I decided to build the triple over the double was so that my wife and I could take our dog with us when we paddle. Like Astoriadave said, with the front and rear cockpits moved toward the ends to make room for the center cockpit, the bow and stern storage areas aren't real large. I chose not to put bulkheads and hatches in this boat because we didn't plan on taking any trips or camping out of it. I figured that if we ever did we could just put everything in dry bags and stuff them in the ends and the center cockpit. This probably wouldn't be the best choice for the ocean or any other big water, but it's O.K. for how we intend to use the boat. One other benefit of the triple is that it can be paddled solo, which I have done a couple of times. Once I paddled solo on a calm day for about 12 miles , but it was a pretty good workout. Once you get the boat moving it is surprising how easy it is to maintain your speed, especially with two paddlers, but you sure wouldn't want to paddle it solo on a regular basis unless you were really big. It is an extremely stable boat that would be very hard to accidentally capsize. I didn't install a rudder and steering has never been an issue either solo or double, but there again if you were to put it on big water with tides and/or strong winds it might be helpful. Although the triple is supposed to weigh around 64 lbs., the actual weight of mine is 77 lbs. If I were to build it again I think I have learned a few things that would allow me to build it a little lighter, but that still isn't bad for a boat this size. All in all it is a fun, safe boat to paddle and a lot of fun to build.
    Dana