Work Table for a Coho Build

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by Doug.Gentry, Apr 14, 2012.

  1. Doug.Gentry

    Doug.Gentry New Member

    Joined:
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    Hi everyone, I'm brand new to this discussion board so please forgive me if I screw anything up.

    I'm about to purchase a Pygmy Coho .. in a box and build it myself.

    I was just looking through a slide show about a man that built his. In the slides he said he build a table 18 ft long in 6 foot sections and I think it was 30 inches wide? In the narration he stated that it was a bit narrow to lay the panels all out.
    My question is, if I build .. when I build the table what width would you make it? I have a fully heated dry 2 car garage dedicated to this. The cars can sit out side. So room is not a problem.

    I also saw that he had a few 2 x 4 that sat upright with what looked like some carpet strips nailed at the upright ends and the kayak sat suspended in that later in the views.

    Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.
    I'm sure I'll have loads of questions as I progress, right now I'm just trying to get everything set up and ready to go before it arrives.

    Thanks

    Doug
     
  2. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Doug-
    Welcome to the WCP site!

    I've built a few stitch and glue (S&G) boats, including a Pygmy Arctic Tern 14.

    I think a work surface 24" wide is plenty for this sort of work. A 4x8 sheet of plywood, and some 2x4 or 2x6 will make a 2 x 16 table. It doesn't have to be overly sturdy - just get a bag of deck screws and put it together quickly.
    You could even support it on sawhorses, and avoid making legs for the table.

    The ends of the boat can hang over the table if you are building a kit. If you need to lay out the parts from a plan (or offsets), a full-length table is better.

    With S&G you can move the work around (unlike a stripper where the boat is on forms attached to a strongback), so the work is easy.

    The carpet 'slings' are for holding the boat (with the temporary forms inside) while you fillet the seams. The Pygmy boat kits come with a good instruction manual, so you should be fine.

    Where are you located? There may well be a builder local to you for advice.
    Another forum you've probably found already is http://www.kayakforum.com - lots of kayak builders there.

    Cheers
    John
     
  3. Tootsall

    Tootsall Paddler

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    For the Coho you'd prefer a table that's at least 18' and, more comfortably, 20' long. You'll be wanting to lay tools & such around the table while you're working. 24" wide is OK, a couple inches more might be easier to work with but then you are going to be cutting a lot more ply for the top.

    It's important that the table is solid and level; makes getting the boat "true" much easier when you get to gluing up the seams and glassing. Take the time to make sure that it's "right" before you even start laying out the plywood pieces and it'll pay dividends "down the road". I made a perimeter "frame" out of 2X4 lumber deck-screwed together and mounted the whole thing on top of saw horses. With the plywood attached to the frame you then can shim and level.

    I found that stapling a sheet of heavy poly (6 to 8 mil) to the top of the worktable worked well: drips of fiberglass didn't harden into the plywood, could be easily peeled off once it had cured, and it was very easy to clean (especially when you're in the scraping/sanding stages). It allows you to "salvage" the plywood when the kayak is finished.

    I highly recommend the small, plastic "measuring cups" as sold by Lee Valley tools. They allow you to mix up small batches of epoxy and really cut down on waste. Having to buy more epoxy is expen$ive, especially in Canada. You can also buy more syringes, plastic gloves & etc. from Lee Valley.

    I am sure there are a lot more suggestions and advice you'll get but you may have to wait a couple of days: I think they're all out camping this weekend!
     
  4. Roy222

    Roy222 Paddler

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    Building a Boat, like a Coho, is broken down in to a series of small process. Concentrate on each process and the Boat will come together. Every kit supplier or builder will have slight variations in the processes. You should follow the Pygmy instructions as close as you can.
    On your first build do not mix instructions, or process from other sources. A small change to a process could throw the build sequence off. This is especially true for Epoxy Glassing.
    You should build the assembly table exactly as the instructions dictate. The boat will build better/easier if you do.
    You are far better off contacting Pygmy if you have questions or concerns about the your build.
    I am not saying that advise from experienced builders is wrong, I am suggesting that you do not vary Pygmy's build process until you have enough experience to understand how changing one small process will affect the rest of the build.

    Again, call Pygmy if the instructions do not make sense.

    Roy
     
  5. eriktheviking

    eriktheviking Paddler

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    Prince George, BC
    Firstly I would echo Roy222's comment about following Pygmy's procedures until you have a good sense of how things go. I had not built much of anything previously, so took a lot of time following instructions to the letter on my first build. Things went way faster on my second S&G. There are a number of issues where choices made in earlier steps impact how things work out later on.

    Pygmy has their own series of short build videos on youtube- you probably want to use those as a primary reference after the manual. You can find these listed at <http://www.pygmyboats.com/kit-construction-process.html>. They even have links to some of the Pygmy builds illustrated on this site!

    I made a work table by ripping a 4x8 sheet in half and then joining the pieces to make it rigid. It is a bit narrow but was fine for the 2 S&G's and a strip kayak I have built (so far). For the S&G's the 16 foot length was not an issue in joining the panel segments, and there was enough room to do several in parallel. The actual stitching construction was not done on the table, but on a parallel set of sawhorses, so I only had to manage the set of long panels as I moved them from the table onto the sawhorses. The table was useful when I got to the stage of removing the deck to work on the hull. The 24 inch wide table was wide enough for that. A few more inches in width would be nice, but much more than that would make it too wide IMHO.
     
  6. Doug.Gentry

    Doug.Gentry New Member

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    Apr 14, 2012
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    Thanks everyone for the responses. I didn't know the pygmy manual had anything in there regarding the table building. I was thinking I can build the table before I got the kayak shipped. This way I'd be all set to go. Now I think I'll just order the boat and follow the instructions to the letter. I'm excited about doing this and think it'll be fun. I was over looking at the Orcaboats and found those so extremely beautiful but darn it looks complicated. I'll stick with the Coho.

    And of course as I write this and find I can't scroll up to view, Someone asked where I was from. I'm from Enumclaw, Wa.

    Thanks again for all the replies.

    Doug
     
  7. Stumpy

    Stumpy Paddler

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    Just to throw in a third vote for following directions, I can speak from experience how skipping a seemingly insignificant detail can make a major difference in the final result, usually not in a good way.... especially on a first build :doh: I've gotten over it, and made several other mistakes on later builds, but they are getting closer to being good mistakes now. :lol:
     
  8. Oldpro

    Oldpro Paddler

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    Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    I built my worktable from a pair of bi-fold doors end-to-end from Home Depot on two pair of folding sawhorses. The whole rig was lightweight, rigid, inexpensive (much cheaper than plywood with 2x stiffeners), and after the builds I've found numerous uses for the doors and sawhorses as temporary worktables for gardening, woodworking, and other projects. :D

    Good luck with your build!

    Oldpro
     
  9. JohnAbercrombie

    JohnAbercrombie Paddler

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    Doug-
    My Pygmy Arctic Tern manual is 'in storage', but I don't recall any mention of worktable specs in that manual, though the current instructions may have table details.
    I built my Tern on sawhorses, IIRC.
    The Coho manual at
    http://app.doubleknot.com/openrosters/D ... sp?id=3618
    suggests building on the floor and/or supported on 3 sawhorses.

    A flat table is handy, though, and easier on the back than working on the floor.
    John
     
  10. mick_allen

    mick_allen Paddler & Moderator

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    the "boat/accessory building" section of this site has 225 pictures plus text of a coho build sequence - including table. Is/was that of some help?
     
  11. RoyN

    RoyN Paddler

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    I have a 24" wide X 16' long table that I used to build a pygmy kit on. The 24" wide table is not wide enough to join all of the panels at one time like the instructions suggest.

    Since you have lots if space on the floor, I'd end-splice the panels on the floor, then use the table to join the panels together to form the hull and deck. This will place most of your work at a comfortable working height on top of the table.