WRECK!

Discussion in 'Boat and Accessory Building' started by woodensoul, Sep 5, 2007.

  1. RobertNPruden

    RobertNPruden Paddler

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    Your Rebuild is looking good!

    I godda good feelin' about it - looks as good as mine did at the current step that the images are showing. Wish I had the images of my rebuild, you'd be surprised at how similar mine were to the ones you are showing now.

    Robert N Pruden :D
     
  2. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    thanks Brad.

    Robert I am starting to appreciate how you must have felt after loosing all your pictures... Hope you still have the boat though?
     
  3. RobertNPruden

    RobertNPruden Paddler

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    Nope!

    I don't have the boat any more...the ex got it. I gave it to her after I modified it so that she could use it years ago. The divorce didn't change anything - she keeps it. I have no worries about it - sooner or later, I know that I'll get it back again. She'll never use it and it was never completely rebuilt so unless she sells it to a builder - she'll have to give it away.

    Robert N Pruden
     
  4. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    The next shots are of the underside of the deck. Now that the mosaic is tacked back into position I am filling the holes from the inside using the same technique I used for the hull. I took a mold off the edge of the rear deck, sorry no pics, and am using this to reconstruct the missing front bits. This pic is of the mold screwed into position and ready to glass.
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    This pic is of the glass layed down, and using the same rounded plank used to reconstruct the cunnels to press out the cloth on the inside curve of the mold.
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    OK, so we go away for the weekend and come back to this...
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    Apparently there was a bit of a windstorm and I am starting to think this boat has a big red bulls eye painted on it! After some serious hacking, there appears to be no additional damage. Whew!
     
  5. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    OK, back to the deck repair. here's a picture of the deck after running my little mold around the outside to repair the outside rim. It was about 5 sessions to get the missing edge pieces replaced. There is now some structural integrity in the edge of the deck, but it's still badly broken down the middle...
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  6. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    Missed posting a couple of pics that show the results of the molding of the first hole...
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    and the outside...
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    There will be some filling to do, but the edge is looking greatly improved!
     
  7. Astoriadave

    Astoriadave Paddler

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    Pretty amazing work, WS. I figured that boat was toast. :shock:
     
  8. Miklos

    Miklos Paddler

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    Your dedication to this project is inspiring. It is amazing how well you are able to reproduce the missing lines so accurately.
     
  9. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    It still maybe, I won't know until it's back in the water weather it's true or not. :)
     
  10. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    Miklos I am leveraging the fact that on this boat that there is a lot of symetry from front to back which is allowing me to create molds. This is getting rid of a lot of the 'free hand' stuff. It would be tougher on many yaks...
     
  11. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    OK, bit of work to show some incrementa progress. The next shot is of the underside of the deck and shows what remains of a tubular support member which now only runs part way along the underside. It's difficult to see, but right on the centerline. It is in the way of facilitating any repairs to the holes in the middle of the deck.
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    So the next step is to remove it. From the school of brute force and ignorance, and angle grinder made short work of this...
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    the next shot is of my trusty form sitting on the back deck. The molds for the edges worked so well, I am going to use the same strategy to get the shape back in those holes in the middle of the deck. You can see earlier pictures of how I created the form when working on the hull.
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    Underside of the foredeck deck after mold has been used to place another patch. Note that the hole is larger than in previous pics, as I ended cutting away a lot of rotten glass before molding the repair.
    [​IMG]Shot of the top of the foredeck. I have some wood bolted to the rails to hold proper shape whil I am glassing holes. It's hard to see the details of the raised spine down the center of the boat because of lighting, but the repair looks pretty true to the corect shape.
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    That was the largest hole in the deck, there are now some smaller ones to chase down. I'll trim the mold dwon for each succesively smaller hole as I move forward on the deck.
     
  12. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    Finaly back on the project with some progress to show. The first shot is of the mold I created to facilitate the 'mid 'deck repairs.
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    The next shot is of the underside with all the holes filled. There were some smaller holes and cracks that got fixed freehand, but the mold was used to get back the shape on all the holes that fell into the 'gaping' category.
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    The next step is to rebuild the support structure that ran the length of the deck. If you look at previous pics you will see that it was an arch shaped structure. Nice and stong, and easy to do in a mold. I have gone with a triangular shape, also nice and strong, and easy to do without a mold. I have ripped a couple of pieces of 1/8" Baltic Birch Plywood to create a structure to glass over. The trusty glue gun has these tacked into place.
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    This is what it looks like with 6 layers of 4oz cloth wetted out and drying on it.
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  13. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    The project has finaly moved indoors! The deck is ready to go back on. First pic is the underside. I have mixed up a bunch of epoxy and glass bubble to create some 'glue'. Its liberally applied to the edge...
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    Next picture has the deck positioned in place. The seem where it was cut away is supported by blocks under the deck and screws. That's going to get glassed after the deck edges are bonded back onto the hull, I want a bit more strength before I turn the grinder loose on it. The deck edges are held down predominantly with packing tape (lots!) and the clamps are secondary.
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  14. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    Next Step is to repair the cut in the deck panel that I made when I removed it to repair the hull. I hve lots of wood blocks screwed underneath. This complicates it as I need them there to hold the shape and alignment properly. There is also a piece of deck missing out of the corner of the panels. I started this repair by grinding out and glassing spots between the screws. It won't be done in one pass...

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    After the first set of patches are dry I can remove most of the screws and blocks. There is one small section that will have to be done on a third pass. More grinding and some more patches later...
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  15. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    OK, it was busy over the winter, but started working on this thing again a few weeks ago, and have been accumulating some pictures in the camera. The deck is all patched together but is a latice work of micro fractures in the gel coat with many patches from below and above. The screw holes have been filled with patches, and all cracks have been filled with a glass bubbles and epoxy filler mixture...
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    So to tie this all together at the cost of a little weight, I have wrapped the deck in a layer of 4oz.
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    No picture of the after glassing job at present. The next step is to deal with the overhanging deck and hull edge that we rebuilt earlier. you can see that it is a sharp ragged mess.

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    Much better now...
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    It's time to flip it over again and get back to the hull repairs... Fill the screw holes, level the high spots and with a filler mixtre of galss bubbles and epoxy fill all the low spots and imperfections...

    [​IMG]
     
  16. woodensoul

    woodensoul Paddler

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    OK, I have been quiet on this for quite some time. Partly because all the intersting things were done and it was getting down to the painting. The other reason was that I spent a lot of time stewing about what to use to finish the hull. This is essentially a polyesther boat that is gelcoated. It is repaired with epoxy, as polyesther fiberglass does not to a great job of sticking to old polyesther glass. The issue is that there is a real phobia about putting polyesther gel coat over epoxy... When I went down and talked to the experts at my local fiberglass shop they categorcally stated 'Don't do that!'. However when reading through the West Epoxy web site, they state that Gelcoat can be used over 'well cured epoxy, that has been cleaned of amine blush'. Given that the hull had been sitting for a year and thouroughly sanded I was not too worried about the blush. The other option was a poly urethane paint. I liked the idea of the gelcoat, as it would likely do a better job of filling in any of the tiny imperfections that are part of an old hull, where the PU would just show these off. I broke down and bought the West How To manuals and decided on the gel coat root...

    Spraying Gel Coat is not diffcult, but it has its own requirements. Its not great to spray through HVLP guns as you need a really large tip. They reccomend a 2.5 mm or larger tip. I managed to get a 2 mm tip for mine, but was concerned enough that I bought a cheap pressuized spray pot at Princess Auto. I thinned the gelcoat down by 10%. This worked fine, but unlike PU paint, the pot time of the mixed gel coat (pigment and catalyst) was the same as the flash time of the sprayed gel coat. So basically after every coat I had to throw out what was left in the pot. Given that the pick up tube does not pick up everything in the pot I ended up having to mix more than I needed for each coat and then throw out the excess. So after 5 or 6 coats, I had probably thrown out 1 liter of gelcoat.

    The gel coat did a great job of filling minor imperfections. It could be layered on quite thick, and the slump sanded off to provide a decent surface. I did a thorough sanding down to about 180 grit after the 5 coats to get the surface perfectly flat before the finish coats. I did see a hint of 'funny paint behaviour' on one of the epoxy patch areas that made me wonder if I was having an adhesion problem to the epoxy, but it seemed fine after the first coat. Next time I did this I think I would use a roller to prime all the spots that needed priming, then sand them flat before spraying the whole thing. This would be a better way to get the gel coat on heavy where you wanted it and result in less being thrown out.

    I put the final two coats on with an HVLP gun and my new 2 mm tip, again thinned down 10%. I was tired of throwing out the excess gel coat after each application. It went pretty good, but it was not as good as the pressure pot, there was a bit of orange pealing.

    This was followed by sanding with an RO sander and hand with wet paper from 150 grit down to 1500, followed by polishing with a polisher and wool pad. Finally with a quick coat of auto wax.

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