aluminum sectional double 1944

mick_allen

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May 15, 2005
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I came across this old ww2 kayak . . . heavy but interesting . . . hatches too!

20’-0’ x 2’-3.5” [bow 4’-6”, mid 11’-0”, stern 4’-6”] x 1’-4” max depth
Wt 300# plus [bow 34#, mid 212#, stern 40#, outriggers 32#]

oh yeah, mid part is reversed for confusion - otherwise real short legs for the bow paddler!:
Cockle1944-1b-sm.jpg


another similar pic [bow section obviously redesigned for more buoyancy] showing sponsons deployed:
Mk9-1a-rev.jpg


and the cool hatch system [note exhaust/intakes for if motor utilized]:
hatches.jpg

https://nmmc.co.uk/object/boats/aluminium-canoe-3/

I don't know why it is, but I kinda like it - and oh yeah, one could call this a legit sea kayak.
 
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CPS

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Oct 27, 2020
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BC
I think they used these on Commando raids during WWII.
An interesting account of one such raid : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Frankton

Pretty funky design. The adjustable outriggers are a cool touch. I imagine these would have been filled to the brim with all sorts of equipment, so probably quite a handful to control.
 

mick_allen

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May 15, 2005
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another ww2 story: 1941- escapes from the netherlands to Britain by folders:
sad that only 25% made it.
**
back to the aluminum - a bunch of them are in museums.
A few more photos . . .
sailing setup:
Mk9-1c.jpg


engine in place:
Mk9-1e.jpg


removed:
Mk9-2e.jpg
 

JKA

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Joined
Jul 25, 2016
Messages
172
Location
Banks Peninsula, New Zealand
another ww2 story: 1941- escapes from the netherlands to Britain by folders:
sad that only 25% made it.
**

Thanks for this link, pretty sobering reading.

Google shows the direct-line distance at about 190km! With the risk of being shot if caught, and potentially a minefield at the landing.

The Greatest Generation.
 
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