assistance in testing stoves

DarenN

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would anyone like to help me compile some data on stoves?
what i'm looking for is very simple. how long does it take to boil water?

parameters;
stove, cookpot, fuel at room temperature.
1 cup cold tap water uncovered.
light the stove, place the pot of water on it, and start the timer.
stop the timer when the water comes to a full boil.

what i would like to know is;
make and model of the stove.
with or without windscreen.
type of fuel.
time to bring to boil.

thanks;
DarenN........
 

DarenN

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Andy_Ferguson said:
What about elevation? Would you like this experiment conducted at sea level?
ultimately, yes, but if you are somewhere away from the coast just note it in your reply and i will take it into account.

it might be an interesting sidebar to the test to see what difference elevation makes.

DarenN.........
 

Dave_Barrie

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On the MEC site they list boil times for pretty much every stove. Even taking different types of fuel and p.s.i. into account. Their boil times are based on 1 litre
 

DarenN

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Dave_Barrie said:
On the MEC site they list boil times for pretty much every stove. Even taking different types of fuel and p.s.i. into account. Their boil times are based on 1 litre
Dave;
i know.
DarenN........
 

DarenN

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Trangia model 27-2
alcohol fuel
as designed. so with windscreen.
4 minutes, 15 seconds.

home made stove (based on "Pepsi Can Stove")
alcohol fuel
with windscreen.
3 minutes, 50 seconds.
 

Mark_Schilling

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I'll gladly help, but there are other variables that would skew your results. For example, if you started with a thick-bottomed pan, your time would be longer as it takes time to get that extra mass up to temperature. Also the size of the base of the pan - a larger pan will have more surface area, increasing the rate at which heat is transferred to the water. You'd want all the pans to be the same dimensions and weights - the only variable in a truly accurate test would be the stove. All other items would have to be equal.

This may be splitting hairs, but cold tap water might be colder in some areas than others. I wouldn't expect more than a few degrees difference around the lower mainland, but I'd bet that Andy's Prince George tapwater comes out colder than yours this time of year.
 

Suzy

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Even a bit of wind on your pot will also slow down your boiling time. Why are you using an uncovered pot?
 

Dan_Millsip

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What's the point of this? Dave suggested a site that has times for most of the popular stoves. Are you writing a book? I'm just curious, is all.

*****
 

DarenN

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it's a "run what you brung" test. just curious, is all.

air temp and wind are taken out of the equation by doing the boil in the kitchen.

i'm interested in how other poeples cooking equipment works for them, useing my own as a basis for comparison. i want to know if there is anything out there that is markedly better than what i am useing, and then i'll research why it is so.

all i'm asking for is five minutes of your time to set up your stove and boil a cup of water.
 

Andy_Ferguson

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DarenN said:
it's a "run what you brung" test. just curious, is all.

air temp and wind are taken out of the equation by doing the boil in the kitchen.

i'm interested in how other poeples cooking equipment works for them, useing my own as a basis for comparison. i want to know if there is anything out there that is markedly better than what i am useing, and then i'll research why it is so.

all i'm asking for is five minutes of your time to set up your stove and boil a cup of water.
I didn't see the "in the kitchen" part. Sorry but I sure won't be lighting my stove indoors. Good luck with the experiment.
 

andreas

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TRANGIA RULES :D

i think darren forgot how bad other stoves work... that's why he asked for a "kitchen test" :wink:
well darren, i think we are just spoiled when it comes to using a camp stove :roll: no pre heating, no stinky gasoline to deal with, no cleaning of anything on a alcohol burner :D , you could even use it in he tent!
man did i ever hate my msr wisperlight back in the 1800's :wink:
 

Mark_Schilling

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OK, here are my results using an MSR Dragonfly on full throttle. The stove was warmed up well before any tests started. All tests were conducted using the coldest tap-water available, and all pots used were also cooled using the same cold tap water before tests commenced, so that the pot and water would have approximately the same temperature to start (this would simulate camping in a colder environment). Also, all tests were performed using the heat shield but no lid, and with the range hood fan fully on to extract that deadly CO from my kitchen. :wink:

Small camping pot (thin stainless steel w/ copper base): 1 min 10 sec
Large camping pot: 1 min 14 sec
Small kitchen pot (very thick aluminum base on stainless steel Lagonstina pots): 1 min 36 sec
Large kitchen pot: 1 min 38 sec

Hope that helps! I love my Dragonfly! :D
 

DarenN

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andreas said:
TRANGIA RULES :D :wink:
there is one other plus to alcohol stoves. alcohol is a renewable resource, unlike petroleum based fuels. it is distilled from wood.

Mark;
thanks for your input on your stoves output. i understand that the dragonfly is one of the better white gas stoves. i also tested a couple propane two-burner stoves. yours is faster than the coleman, but not quite as fast as my little Yanes; a cheapie, made in brazil.
DarenN......
 

Chris_Hvid

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Stove Test Results - Homemade methanol stove.

Hi Darren...thanks for the invitation to test stoves (I've got <had> the bug). You re-triggered my addiction!

And my results could foreshadow the emergence of the methanol/ethanol economy, so I had better be circumspect in presenting my test results!

My test was a modification of a Supercat stove, made from a Michaels Craft Tin and a Dairyland small evaporated milk tin, using methanol fuel.
The vessel was a MSR Titanium Kettle containing one <measured> cup of cold (Sooke Lake Temperature) tapwater. I added fuel to the stove and priming pan, started the timer and lit the fuel in the priming pan.

I found that when the Supercat was max loaded with fuel, the time was considerably lower, as the stove heats up much faster earlier, increasing the pressure on the alcohol to volatilize. So it would be better on a larger volume of water. This time was 3:30 to boil the cup. But there was a ton of alcohol left in the stove, leaving the stove burning hot and over half full at the end of the test. When test was repeated with about enough methanol to boil the cup (plus a bit extra - how much extra?) the time to roiling boil was over 6 minutes. So if the stove had exactly the right amount to boil the water the time would probably be around seven minutes, assuming linear effects throughout the scale.

I've managed to convince myself that this could be a fun extra stove to have, along with the Pocket Rocket or Windpro, using those for more control, and the methanol one for tea, rather than bringing along another cannister - just save the cannisters for fine control and simmering applications or backpacker ovens. Why not have a liter of methanol around? I'd hate to not have the fine simmer control though, which is why I haven't drank all of the methanol Koolaid (which is a good thing, given its hazards). And it is a fun paradigm shift, to consider using alcohol made homegrown from dead otherwise useless pine-beetle wood - very ecological someday no doubt. But no panacea for my cooking needs while kayaking - or backpacking. Definitely too dangerous for boy scouts to play with too (the liability thing etc.). I can easily see spilled flaming methanol running across someone's silnylon-whatever...

So I have left recovery from my methanol stove obsession lately. On to wood stoves!
 

DarenN

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Chris;
3:30 is a good time for Cat or Supercat. the problem with them is that the cans used are too heavey. they heat too slowly, as opposed to aluminum can burners.

another huge variable (i just found out) is height of the pot above the burner. i new it made a difference, but didn't realize how much. one website states that a Trangia 27 will shorten it's boil time by about 25% by raising the pot 14mm. i'm working on testing that now.

alcohol stoves can simmer beautifully, with the right type of cap for the burner. the Trangia burner simmers great! i've nailed down a simmerring cap design that works very well for the pepsi can stove. alternatively, you can snuff out your burner and replace it with a tea-light candle. this works quite well.

one more thing. titanium pots are great, except for the fact that they are slower to boil than aluminum. i found this info online. but again. what's the rush? :D

DarenN........
 
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