boat construction

What kind of boat construction do you have?

  • Standard fibreglass

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Kevlar

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Expedition or tuflam

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

Mike_Jackson

Paddler
Joined
Mar 29, 2005
Messages
591
Location
Victoria BC
I'd be interested to hear what experience people have had with various different composite boat construction systems. What I have seen seems to be available:
Standard Fibregalss - least expensive
Kevlar - 8-10 % lighter and a few hundred $$ more
Expedition or tuflam - same weight as fibregalss, stronger and even more $$
 

Mark_Schilling

Paddler
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
4,552
Location
"Home by the Sea" - Nanaimo, BC
Dan_Millsip said:
And wood -- and ballistic nylon? :wink:

*****
Well he did say "composite boat". :p

My Romany Explorer is just 'regular' fibreglass, but it's heavier than pretty much any other single boat I've encountered. Nigel Dennis uses extra lay-up to make the Romany tough enough for rocky beach landings in surf and other scenarios that would normally destroy a boat quite quickly. It's probably a bit overkill for most paddling around here, but it's nice to know that the boat can handle a bit of abuse if it needs to.
 

Dan_Millsip

Paddler
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
9,297
Location
Beautiful BC
Mark_Schilling said:
Dan_Millsip said:
And wood -- and ballistic nylon? :wink:

*****
Well he did say "composite boat". :p
Hmmm... strictly speaking, my wood kayak is a composite boat -- it utilizes a monocoque construction of wood encapsulated in fiberglass and epoxy.

I definitely can offer some opinion of my experiences with wooden (composite :D ) kayaks.

*****
 

Mike_Jackson

Paddler
Joined
Mar 29, 2005
Messages
591
Location
Victoria BC
I have a plastic boat (sirocco) and am interested in the other constructions for a future purchase. When I tried creating the poll, I had plastic and wood in there, but somehow those options did not make it through when I pressed submit. I could not find a way to edit a posting or a poll once submitted.
I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on wood/glass composites too! However, I am not sure I have the time or the manufacturing skill to make my own wood boat...
 

Mark_Schilling

Paddler
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
4,552
Location
"Home by the Sea" - Nanaimo, BC
Mike_Jackson said:
When I tried creating the poll, I had plastic and wood in there, but somehow those options did not make it through when I pressed submit. I could not find a way to edit a posting or a poll once submitted.
Some more stuff for Dan to figure out during his free time. :lol: :?


However, I am not sure I have the time or the manufacturing skill to make my own wood boat...
I'm tentatively planning on attempting such a feat this winter - I'll let you know how it turns out. If I do half as good a job as Dan has done on his Osprey Double I'll be pretty happy - not to say my standards are low; just that his boat looks darn near perfect. I've seen some other Pygmy kits that look like they were thrown together by comparison.
 

Dan_Millsip

Paddler
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
9,297
Location
Beautiful BC
Mark_Schilling said:
Mike_Jackson said:
When I tried creating the poll, I had plastic and wood in there, but somehow those options did not make it through when I pressed submit. I could not find a way to edit a posting or a poll once submitted.
Some more stuff for Dan to figure out during his free time. :lol: :?
I looked and I can't figure out what the problem is. The polls are set for up to 10 choices -- guess I'll have to take another look.


However, I am not sure I have the time or the manufacturing skill to make my own wood boat...
I'm tentatively planning on attempting such a feat this winter - I'll let you know how it turns out. If I do half as good a job as Dan has done on his Osprey Double I'll be pretty happy - not to say my standards are low; just that his boat looks darn near perfect. I've seen some other Pygmy kits that look like they were thrown together by comparison.
Aw shucks. :oops:

It's really not difficult to build your own boat from a kit. In fact, it's embarassingly easy. If you can follow instructions, operate a random orbit sander, and have a bit of patience, you can build one.

I must say that the wooden boat has proven itself to be quite desirable. It's as light and strong as kevlar (my double weighs in at less than 70 lbs, including the rudder and deck hardware!), and has proven to be exceptionally durable. While I'm not hard on my boat and avoid running it up on beaches and rocks, I certainly don't baby it either, as others here can attest to.

The boat is now nearly three years old and has a few scratches on the bottom of the hull but all is superficial. A few short months ago I hit a boomer in English Bay that scared the heck out of me -- in fact, I landed so hard on top of a barnacle encrusted rock that I thought that for sure the boat had sustained considerable damage -- when I got to the shore, there was barely a mark! I suspect that I'll get at least another full season (and maybe two) out of the boat before refinishing it -- and that would only be for minor cosmetic reasons, structurally, there are no problems at all.

I've also decided to build another wood kayak later this year -- I'm seriously considering the Pygmy Arctic Tern, a hard chine greenland style hull. You can see it at http://www.pygmyboats.com

When I build the new boat, I'll refinish my double but not before making a number of modifications. I've decided to install an extra set of bulkheads and a hatch between the two cockpits, as well as a number of small mods such as underdeck shelves, a compass mount, flattening a small spot on the stern in front of the rudder for mounting my night light, and also install a couple of paddle parks. I don't have perimeter lines on the double so I'll most likely add them as well.

That's one of the more important factors of building your own boat -- you can modify it any way you want -- and it's no big deal to do so.

The only real downside to owning a wooden boat is that you must allow about an extra half hour to get in the water because you always get people coming up and admiring and asking questions about it. But I have to admit that this is a nice downside. :wink:

*****
 

Komatiq

Paddler
Joined
Jul 23, 2005
Messages
152
Location
Vancouver Island
94 Valley Pintail, ocean cockpit, with deck pump and compass recess.
17'6" x 21" It's the old low volume version, good for a week's trip if you pack like a backpacker. :lol:

Standard lay up, diolen I beleive they call it in the UK. Little on the heavy side but a real sweet boat and friendly to Greenland style paddling and rolling.
 

Batstar

Paddler
Joined
Jul 20, 2005
Messages
347
Location
Alberta
I put my vote down for standard glass since that’s what I currently paddle in...a Necky Looksha IV if we’re naming brands of boats.

That said, I’ve got to agree with Dan. Wood boats rock!! I’m nearing the completion stage of my Pygmy build and must admit that it’s looking pretty darn good, although when finished, it probably wouldn’t hold a light to Dan’s Osprey. I guess it’s safe to say that many first time builders get the most satisfaction in saying that, ‘I built it myself’. ;)

Here’s a link to my work in progress. I’ll be sure to post further updates to the album so be sure to stay tuned. :)

Pygmy Arctic Tern Project
 
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