Camera or GoPro?

sofstu

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I turn my Hero 7 voice activation off for that same reason and stick with the tried and true!
Sound recording inside the gopro wp case sucks.
I know some people record sound on their bluetooth smart phone and edit it together with the video footage from the gopro.
 
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cougarmeat

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Though won’t work with tight waterproof cases, this might work with a looser “bag”. ... One of my older cameras has a mic input port. Wireless mics are easy to find on various e-stores. So if you are making a presentation, you can set the camera up at the best distance and have the mic right on your lapel. But, never having made a recording, I don’t know if it is easier just to get the video and add the narrative during “production” at home. The looser bag would be a waterproof something that enclosed the camera and had room for the small wireless receiver. Now that I think of it - that’s pretty old school. I’m guessing these days such a connection would be made with built-in BlueTooth.
 

Tongo-Rad

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Sound recording inside the gopro wp case sucks.
I know some people record sound on their bluetooth smart phone and edit it together with the video footage from the gopro.
I wonder if that's the case with older GoPros (no pun intended!), but the GP Hero 7 is natively waterproof to 10 meters. I use a snap on case which provides mic holes on either side, a tripod mount and a lanyard - which is handy for snorkeling. On the kayak I've found the mic sensitive enough to pic up casual conversation from paddling partners. I think GP is at version 9 now, which means latest-and-greatest-tech-folks are often selling their 7s with accessories for under $200.

There's some great free editing software out there too. I started to use iMovie simply because it was already on my Mac and found it definitely adequate without a steep learning curve. I highly recommend the free tool, Handbrake to compress it afterward for sharing files that aren't gigantic.
 

VIP

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I wonder if that's the case with older GoPros (no pun intended!), but the GP Hero 7 is natively waterproof to 10 meters. I use a snap on case which provides mic holes on either side, a tripod mount and a lanyard - which is handy for snorkeling. On the kayak I've found the mic sensitive enough to pic up casual conversation from paddling partners. I think GP is at version 9 now, which means latest-and-greatest-tech-folks are often selling their 7s with accessories for under $200.

There's some great free editing software out there too. I started to use iMovie simply because it was already on my Mac and found it definitely adequate without a steep learning curve. I highly recommend the free tool, Handbrake to compress it afterward for sharing files that aren't gigantic.
Hi Tongo, i agree, the mic can p/u the sound very clear unless you dunk it in water, then it's a bit muffle. I like using imovie too as it's very easy editing app on my iPad Pro. One of the nice feature I enjoy is when I connect my GoPro via a USB-C directly over to my iPad Pro, it charges my camera and the rate of transfer is very fast compared to using Bluetooth for videos and photos.
 

CaliPaddler

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FWIW the newer GoPro remote button is pretty slick, can pair with multiple cameras, is waterproof, and works better than previous generation. I find it easy to wear on my PFD… and spare my friends the sound of me shouting “stop recording“ at the gopro on my bow.
 

PhotoMax

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Interesting topic!

There are a ton of options here. Creating a kit for photos/video/audio is a huge arena.

Creating a compact dry camera kit for say sea kayaking adventures is a specific challenge. Very doable if you have a specific goal in mind plus how important the end project is to you.

Couple of pointers:
If you hope to create a killer video with sound of a fun weekend adventure don‘t even try to capture long video camera sessions with perfect video and sound. Long camera shots are boring! Instead put your effort into capturing brief moments that can be edited into a sequence.

Try to capture the same brief scene from different camera positions. Move your camera from the front of your boat to the back of your boat and over to your paddling partner. Experiment. You can repeat a specific scene to achieve this. You can then mix these shots into a sequence. Wany more interesting!

Mix up the viewpoint: Hollywood movies have quick moving changes from wide shots, medium shots and closeups. Try to mix it up and your sequence will be way better.

Bad sound is way more annoying than bad video. Big time. About the only sound that is captured in feature films is dialogue. The rest is created in Foley Sound studios. It is easier to record bits of audio separately and use them by adding them to your video segments. The Zoom H1 recorder is a killer compact microphone package for less than $100. Putting it into a condom will keep it dry and still capture way better audio than most cameras.

You can build your own audio library of sounds: waves, birds, paddling, dragging a kayak on the shore, camp fire, distant voices, even quiet “silence”, etc, etc. No one will ever know your audio was not captured “in camera“. Audio from a handheld action camera is usually horrible.

Learn to capture B Roll: little bits of video and audio that you can mix in with your main footage. Landing, exiting your kayak, setting up camp, tying knots, hatch covers, lighting fires, cooking, anything.

You don’t have to record everything. Enjoy the outing without feeling pressure of creating a cinematic masterpiece. But capturing short planned shots can be way easier and way more interesting than one ten minute video with the camera running constantly…
 
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cougarmeat

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A note about what PhotoMax said on audio timing. Once a TV network filmed their “Survival of the Fittest” competition (decades ago) at our Smith Rocks climbing area. While there, they had a group of locals stand near a large rock (for sound bounce and echo) and cheer. Then, when the episode was shown on TV, you could hear cheering as runners passed some waypoint. But that cheering didn’t happen during that actual event. it was dubbed in from the cheering footage they had recorded separtely.

As an aside, it was interesting to see the politics involved. The show had focused on Lyn Hill (elite rock climber in her day) as a potential winner in the women’s category; most footage was of her and her close competitor. But in the last event, she made a mistake and went off course. Early on, competitors who went off course were disqualified. There were volunteers who would shout to the runners, “This way!” to keep them oriented. But the network couldn’t end with Lyn being disqualified so it came down to this … Because the route she took didn’t shorten the course (was actually a tad longer) and because, unlike other competitors, she had a helicopter overhead making a lot of noise, she was given a pass for going off route. Note that her close competitor was in the same circumstance and somehow had managed to stay on track. So Lyn Hill was not disqualified and was declared the winner.

What you see on TV is carefully engineered.
 

YYJ Paddler

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Hi all

Sorry that I haven't replied. The problem is that I just haven't made a decision! I'm off to the Broken group in a few days, but fortunately(?) I found an even older(?) camera than my original tough. I have a Panasonic LUMIX which is meant to be waterproof. Hopefully it still works above the water at least! Not sure I'll try to roll with it, but I'll give it a go until I can make a decision and put up some new money.
 

Tongo-Rad

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Here's a timely [30 min] video on kayaking with a camera that just came out a few days ago by Ken Whiting, including tips on resolution, frames per second, and so on. One thing not mentioned is that the GP takes great quality photos too.

 

chodups

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Here's a timely [30 min] video on kayaking with a camera that just came out a few days ago by Ken Whiting, including tips on resolution, frames per second, and so on. One thing not mentioned is that the GP takes great quality photos too.
Thanks for posting. Very helpful.
 
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