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Camp Sites - US Waters

sbourgoin

Where the paddle takes me
Joined
Mar 2, 2019
Messages
100
Location
Port Alberni, BC
Has anyone come across a US equivalent of BC Marine Trails for Camp Sites? Looking for North of Prince Rupert into Glacier Bay and to Skagway. Cheers
Thanks
 
You're free to camp pretty much anywhere in the Tongass, so it's just a matter of finding spots that seem appealing. I'm in the midst of planning the same portion of my trip.

My plan is a combination of looking at charts to find potential sites while double checking with available aerial imagery, and of course winging it while actually paddling. Gotta keep some of the sense of adventure.

 
Sorry, I can't help you with your specific question. But this might be helpful.

Land ownership in Alaska is complicated. The big dog is the US government, in SE AK that mostly means the Tongass National Forest. If Glacier Bay National Park is on your agenda, they have very specifics rules for campers/kayakers. The State of AK also owns chunks of land and access is usually even more permissive than for most federal land (except for the National Park Service). Other important land holders include Native Corporations as well as Native Villages. There are Joe citizen private holdings too. Just to muddy the water a bit more, Native entities (Corporations and Villages) are still making selections of lands under the Alaska National Lands Interest Conservation Act of 1979.

This is the best place to do research on who owns what is the Alaska Public Lands Information Centers. https://www.nps.gov/anch/index.htm

The Forest Service and the State are really laid back. The NPS is the polar opposite with rangers that are constantly looking for campers without the appropriate permits. Native land is usually posted if they don't want you on it. Anything that looks like a mining operation is best given a very wide berth. Miners are highly protective of their claims and most really like their assault rifles..... But that's more of a problem with placer miners in the Interior.
 
A couple of other thoughts.

If you use a mapping program on your smart phone, Onyx has far more land ownership info than Gaia GPS or Alltrails.

Most of the Native Corporations allow you to purchase a permit for access to their lands for recreational purpose such as camping or hiking.
 
For getting a gerneral view of locations/regions of interest, Shorezone could be really helpful:

Shorezone.jpg


https://alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/mapping/sz/
oh geez, just re-read that CPS had already noted that site, duh. Sorry for stepping on your toes, CPS.

**
maybe to redeem myself somewhat:
Here is a jpg and the kmz locations that I think the FON group used in Alaska from the border to Skagway. Notation is mine and not complete: names are explanatory: numbers are 1,2,3= good, med, lousy ldgs, then 1,2,3 good, med, lousy sites, E= exposed, P=protected or small fetch - to my first,quick estimation.
FONgrouptrip.jpg

 

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And to compare with the above, here's the waypoints of the Denis Dwyer 2008 Alaska portion to Skagway. It's interesting to over lay the FON trips waypoints on the Dwyer waypoints.
Dwyer2008trip.jpg

Denis's website with the info:

and the kmz file
 

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  • DenisDwyer2007,8.zip
    7.6 KB · Views: 49
For getting a gerneral view of locations/regions of interest, Shorezone could be really helpful:

View attachment 15054

https://alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/mapping/sz/
oh geez, just re-read that CPS had already noted that site, duh. Sorry for stepping on your toes, CPS.

**
maybe to redeem myself somewhat:
Here is a jpg and the kmz locations that I think the FON group used in Alaska from the border to Skagway. Notation is mine and not complete: names are explanatory: numbers are 1,2,3= good, med, lousy ldgs, then 1,2,3 good, med, lousy sites, E= exposed, P=protected or small fetch - to my first,quick estimation.
View attachment 15057
Thanks for sharing this! Great to find some used sites. Looking forward to adventuring into Alaska in 2025!
 
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