can you roll on both sides?

how many sides can you roll on?

  • one side only

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • two sides

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • bottom side only (ie roll out of the boat)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

Doug

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May 9, 2006
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195
Location
Vancouver
I'm curious as to how common it is for sea kayakers to be able to roll on both sides.

thx
 

Maddie

Paddler
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Jan 30, 2008
Messages
148
I have rolled on both sides.. although my offside is pretty sketchy :D
 

Ken B

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Joined
Mar 27, 2008
Messages
558
Location
Campbell River, B.C.
I actually just learned to roll consistantly well 2 weekends ago (Dubside Clinic).

My 'Strong Side' is close to being Bomb Proof...my 'Off Side' needs lots of work.
 

lance_randy

Paddler
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
568
Location
Victoria
Yup. both sides are pretty much bombproof I think.

It's funny though, most of the rolls that I know, I'm equally good at on both sides, a couple are easier on my dominant side (right) and the new ones I'm working on, chest sculling, and the forward recovery rolls, are actually easier on my left side.

I think this is because I have spent so much time doing layback rolls on my right side, and less on my left, that it is easier for my body to learn new tricks on it's non-dominant side.

So many times when I'm trying to come out of chest sculling on my right, I automatically go into the layback position, it's kinda frustrating, actually

:oops:
 

waverider

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Oct 8, 2006
Messages
671
Location
langley
I can roll one side no matter what, "other side" terrible, but doesn't matter if all else fails I just "hand roll " :p
 

GordB

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Joined
Apr 27, 2005
Messages
165
Location
Ladner, BC
Yep both sides.

Left is bombproof ( first time.. every time ), right is getting there. If the right doesn't work first time it does on the second, tho it still doesn't have the snap that my primary onside has. It can be a bit mushy sometimes.
 

windowshade

Paddler
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Messages
21
Location
St. John's, Newfoundland
I can roll both sides. Being able to do so is important, at least if you paddle in rough conditions or surf your kayak at the shore. In those situations, rolling "with" the waves means you roll up fairly easily, while rolling "against' the waves means you probably don't make it up. Thus, you need to be able to roll on which ever side is "with" the waves. Being able to "switch sides" underwater is important.
 

cory

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Joined
Jun 3, 2008
Messages
15
Location
Victoria B.C.
both sides are equally "bombproof" (when can we stop using that word )

I agree that its so important to be able to switch, especially if you are relying on rolling to overcome obvious shortcomings in paddle skill :)
 

Doug

Paddler
Joined
May 9, 2006
Messages
195
Location
Vancouver
wow, I'm really surprised at how many people can roll on both sides compared to just one side.

I never learned to roll on my left side, but I might have to now after injuring my right shoulder.
 

Mark_Schilling

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Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
4,552
Location
"Home by the Sea" - Nanaimo, BC
If you learn to roll because you paddle in more advanced sea conditions (or want to, or plan to), it's important to learn both sides equally, as many above have stated. There are lots of scenarios that will dictate you have to roll up on one side rather than the other - capsizing in surf, rolling up where there's an obstabcle (another boat, rocks, etc.) on one side, or perhaps you've injured a muscle or joint on one side of your body during or before the capsize, and need to roll up to utilize your uninjured side. Most people find it harder to learn an off-side roll once you have a good side, so it might be easier to learn both together. I still have an off-side in one boat (the Pygmy Tern 14) but can roll in the Explorer quite well on either side. It wasn't always this way - I found the best way to eliminate my off-side was to do twice as many rolls on that side as on my good side.
 

mikec

Paddler
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
601
Location
Sept-Îles, QC
the best way to eliminate your off-side is to stop referring to it as such. "alternate on-side", "secondary on-side" or any variation there-of will help with the mental game that holds most people back.

bilateral practice, though making for slower progress allows a greater degree of skill aquisition in the end. the old tortoise and hair analogy applies here.

as for an answer to the poll, yes, roll on both, bombproof anywhere anytime in a variety of fashions.
 

mikec

Paddler
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
601
Location
Sept-Îles, QC
for anyone doubting the power of changing how we refer to the off-side, please have a chat with GordB about his results!
 

Doug

Paddler
Joined
May 9, 2006
Messages
195
Location
Vancouver
For sure I know why being able to roll on both sides is important, coming from a WW background. I plan on improving my rolls later this year or next year, whenever my injuries get better. I'd really like to improve my sculling and bracing too, those are crucial and go hand in hand with rolling.

cheers
 

inpayne

Paddler
Joined
Feb 15, 2008
Messages
158
Location
Victoria BC
Ahhh, but the bigger question is of who have a WW background or not.

.......When first introduced to the rolling shows at paddlefests it was slightly amusing at what basics got the audience riled up. ;)
 

Doug

Paddler
Joined
May 9, 2006
Messages
195
Location
Vancouver
inpayne said:
Ahhh, but the bigger question is of who have a WW background or not.

.......When first introduced to the rolling shows at paddlefests it was slightly amusing at what basics got the audience riled up. ;)
I'm not sure I get you. Can you give some examples?

thx
 

inpayne

Paddler
Joined
Feb 15, 2008
Messages
158
Location
Victoria BC
Doug, among too many in the sea kayaking community rolling is considered some magical dark art. Among others, it's an unexceptional fundamental.
 
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