Epoxy paint for stitch n glue?

rider

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Hey. finally my project, 15 ft kayak i named Sea Turtle is relatively close to paint stage, should be there in a week or so.
I know the typical thing to do is either a pretty not-durable varnish, or a durable but expensive LPU. This thing isn't going to come out pretty enough to finish bright so i am thinking paint, didnt decide yet on yellow,orange or Necky Lime but that'll come to me eventually.
Does anybody have any experience with industrial 2 part epoxy coatings?
I painted my garage floor 4 years ago with this http://www.cloverdalepaint.com/html/cat ... =833Series and it held up great,only times i damaged it is when dropping something like a hex dumbell or a vice from 3+ft.
What do you think of this http://www.cloverdalepaint.com/html/cat ... =838Series.
?
I am pretty sure it would be durable but don't know about adhesion of that type of coating to epoxy on the hull. I like the idea of a 2 part because that eliminates soft spots in runs or the odd puddle (if i paint cockpit)
 

Jill

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Rider, I Know you were asking about 2 part paint. I have never used it, but I have had good success with a brand called Varathane colors in plastic . It rolls on great, stays nice and shiny, and is available at the local hardware store. It's probably a little tougher than varnish ,but maybe not tough enough for what your'e after. I painted the hull of my cheasapeake with it ,most of the wear is at the bow and stern. I have used tremclad on a old fiberglass row boat to get rid of the itch. The color faded and it lost is gloss but the paint was tough. Jill
 

Mark_Schilling

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I've heard very good things about the 2-part polyurethane paints. They're essentially the same thing as the clear, 'hi gloss' LPU that Dan has used on his s&g and that I'll be using on mine, but in paint form to add colour. They may not be inexpensive, but they'll give you a very tough finish.

the other option as I see it would be to apply a pigment to your epoxy before applying it as a fill coat, then finish the boat with whatever you want (ie a clear varnish or LPU) afterwards.

Not having worked with either of these techniques before, others might be able to fill you in on the advantages and disadvantages of each.
 

Astoriadave

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I have used two-part epoxy paint, in vis yellow, and it is no cheaper than the two-part LPU's.

Pigment the last couple layers of epoxy, and then varnish it -- the varnish will provide the UV protection, and the pigment will never wear off unless you go all the way through the epoxy.
 

rider

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I've used Varathane on the deck of my ancient fiberglass double last season, and was not overly impressed with it. it did the job more or less but it faded some and was pretty easy to scratch/mark up.
I thought about pigmenting, but decided i'd rather be able to see where i scuff up the boat rather than not, that and varnish is still very easily scratched and i'd like some extra abrasion protection out of the paint layer.
 

Batstar

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I decided to use the two-part ‘clear’ LPU to finish my Tern mainly because of its extremely hard drying properties as Mark pointed out. I also like the fact that it cleans up in water and that there is no solvent smell. LPU also dries fast so it’s possible to completely finish a boat in a day or less. The only drawback might be that surface prep needs to be immaculate as any imperfection would be transmitted through the high gloss.

System three recommends using a light paint color as opposed to a darker shade to avoid ‘print through’.
 

Astoriadave

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Batstar said:
(re: LPU:) System three recommends using a light paint color as opposed to a darker shade to avoid ‘print through’.
That's a significant issue for sng boats. My Pygmy single, though finished bright, and varnished carefully, showed some print through of the glass weave on the deck, after maybe five years of regular use, and time in the warm sun. Dark colors really do heat up in the sun.
 

Peel

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I've used Petit Easypoxy 1-part polyurathane enamel on my sailboat. I put it on about 10 years ago, and it's still going strong. The boat is a 24' fiberglass keelboat, so the hull flexes quite a bit, but the paint has never shown cracking (even hairline). It's easy to apply, and fairly inexpensive. West Marine has it for $32 US a quart, which will cover 150sf in a single coat.

It can be brushed on, and self levels fairly quickly, but has enough viscocity to not drip (unless you put it on REALLY thick). You can watch the brush marks dissappear within a minute after brushing it on.

Here's a couple links with more info:
Petit: http://www.pettitpaint.com/catalog_browse.asp?ictNbr=45
West Marine: http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product/10001/-1/10001/20425/10001/91/11204/4
 

rider

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Thanks ! I've actually researched easypoxy before and the only thing really stopping me was that i have doubts about it's abrasion resistance. How easily is it scratched?
 

Peel

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rider said:
...How easily is it scratched?
Like I said I've had it on my sailboat for 10 years, on both the hull and deck. It's stood up to an untold number of feet wearing the most inappropriate footwear, dropped tools, dropped bottles, broken bottles, spilled red wine, and a few atrocities I don't wish to recall. I pressure wash it a couple times each summer, and I often get people asking me if I've recently painted my boat.

The closest to a scratch I've had is where a metal winch handle was dragged across the deck and it left a metalic grey mark. This didn't come out with the pressure wash, and I thought it might have gone through the surface, but I took a buffer to it with a little extra-fine buffing compound, and it came out completely.

BTW, I used the high gloss white.
 
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