Fishing for dinner... Tips and tricks

RobertB

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Dec 5, 2007
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34
Location
Toronto, Ontario
This isn't about kayak fishing per se, which seems to have a following all its own. But as my trips get longer, I think it would be a neat addition to the repertoire to be able to hook dinner now and then. I've seen references to some of y'all doing just that.

So what kind of gear do I need? Should I just head over to my local BassPro and let em hook me up? (no pun intended) Should I get a rod and reel that's designed for travel, or are those multi-section rods garbage? How about the Popeil Pocket fisherman type unit? (But wait, there's more...)

It's definitely location-specific on some levels. But not all. Any pointers?

robert
 

nootka

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May 26, 2007
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Campbell River
I would suggest a multi-piece rod & a spinning reel with 8 lb test. Start simple with 2 spinners, 2 spoons, a rapala, and a surface lure for bass. Ask at the local fishing store for brands & sizes of lures. They'll want to know what species you are after & what locations. Add in hooks & sinkers so you can bottom fish for catfish.

PS: you can make a robust travel case for your multi-piece rod from 2"ABS pipe. If you sew loops of 1" nylon webbing around it (before you glue it), you can attach it to decklines.
 

Comoxpaddler

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Aug 30, 2006
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502
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Comox, BC
A low cost low volume option is a handline. 20 pound test line. Drift around on the edge of a kelp bed with the lure on the bottom and jig it up and down rapidly. I caught 4 rock cod in about 90 minutes during a trip last year. Also reduces the risk of capsize. A smallish ling cod nearly pulled me over when I caught him off the side of my (then) 24 inch wide kayak using an 8 foot rod. Can't remember the physics but a small powerful fish on the end of a long rod can pull you over.
 

DarrenM

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Mar 16, 2005
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Victoria BC
Comoxpaddler said:
A low cost low volume option is a handline. 20 pound test line. Drift around on the edge of a kelp bed with the lure on the bottom and jig it up and down rapidly. I caught 4 rock cod in about 90 minutes during a trip last year. Also reduces the risk of capsize. A smallish ling cod nearly pulled me over when I caught him off the side of my (then) 24 inch wide kayak using an 8 foot rod. Can't remember the physics but a small powerful fish on the end of a long rod can pull you over.
Excuse my ignorance.. :oops: What do you do with the line when "reeling" it in?
 

DarrenM

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Mar 16, 2005
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Victoria BC
doh! ok I get it, didn't realize there is an actual devise... (ya I need to get out more)

Thanks
 

oul

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Dec 31, 2008
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Location
Huntington Beach, CA
Comoxpaddler said:
A low cost low volume option is a handline. 20 pound test line. Drift around on the edge of a kelp bed with the lure on the bottom and jig it up and down rapidly. I caught 4 rock cod in about 90 minutes during a trip last year.
Good idea, just be careful where you grab them or put your fingers as some have teeth and sharp gill plates.
 

RobertB

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Dec 5, 2007
Messages
34
Location
Toronto, Ontario
Nootka... current paddling is primarily Great Lakes... Georgian Bay is home base... headed up to Lake Superior (your hunting grounds, I believe) for my long summer trip this year. The multi-section rod makes the most sense for packing, but I was concerned about durability.

Comoxpaddler... nifty idea with the hand reel rig.
 

SheilaP

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Jun 6, 2007
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1,012
Location
Victoria, BC
I made an awesome handline last summer. I got the tips from Bucky's Sport Shop in Duncan.

It all started with this little gizmo: http://www.hardwarestore.com/media/prod ... ont200.jpg It is a cord storage wrap. It costs about three dollars.

I purchased 'hand line' and wrapped it on. Only to the length I would need. This was to avoid tangles and losing huge amounts of line. I had a tiny tackle box that fit under my deck and quick release swivels to put my lure on and off with quickly. When not in use the 'handline' fit right beside my seat and was indestructable. (I sat on it a few times.)

When I was in the 'right spot' (day, time, etc). I would put the lure on, let the line down, and put the handline under my deck bungies in front of me. I put a bungee cord with closing plastic clips onto the handline and secured it to the deck. When I caught a fish it would come out from under the deck bungies and dangle in the water right beside my right arm ready to grab and 'reel in'. (Even small fish would make the line pop out, so I could tell when I had something and didn't drag a little fish or sea kitty to its death.)

I could jig or troll. I preferred trolling because that way I could keep paddling and not drift about. (And I happen to like salmon.)

BE PREPARED for what to do with the STINKY fish! :shock: :shock: :shock: The first good one I caught I let go because I was not prepared. An old dry bag in the cockpit dedicated to this purpose works.

Don't forget your fishing licence and to check the fisheries site for openings and limits! http://www-ops2.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/xnet/ ... creational

Communicating with group members about fishing is really crucial. Catching a fish puts you way behind when travelling. Alas, this is worth another forum. :wink:
 

oldsailor

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Mar 28, 2008
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Moses Lake, WA
Depending upon the size of the fish - and the species - boating a fish can be a serious issue. When I was a commercial fisherman in the 70s I heard of at least one case where a solo troller in Alaska was killed by a halibut he had brought aboard. There were signs of a struggle on the deck and fish blood all over. The theory was that he had brought in a bigger halibut and since they are infamous for thrashing around on deck and for their strength it was assumed that he somehow got unbalanced with the fish and either fell or got knocked overboard leaving his boat to continue on autopilot.

Craig
 

SheilaP

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Jun 6, 2007
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Victoria, BC
True true Oldsailor,

I have a knife on my PFD and my partner ready to attach a short two should I ever get that elusive big one. Jo watched someone she paddled with on a long trip reel in a 100 lb halibut that he had caught from his canoe. had to go to shore to land that one. :shock:
 

RobertB

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Joined
Dec 5, 2007
Messages
34
Location
Toronto, Ontario
The reel Nootka linked to is called a Cuban Yo-yo or a Cuban Reel. Not sure why :?

SheilaP's bungie system sounds like a good idea... you'd have now way of knowing if you had a strike trolling with a hand reel lashed to your boat...
 

nootka

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May 26, 2007
Messages
1,725
Location
Campbell River
I forgot to mention that a 3 foot ice fishing rod is a good choice for kayaking. It has enough give to fight a fish, but is short enough that it is easy to handle. They are one piece, so do not pack up quite as small as a multi piece regular rod. You won't get the casting distance of a regular rod, but it beats a handline. Very useful for trolling from a kayak, as it can sit on the rear deck, perpendicular to the kayak, but is too short for the tip to continually dip underwater as you paddle.
 

Monster

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Apr 6, 2008
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276
Location
Vancouver
The trick for me on longer trips has always been to try and only catch the smaller meal sized ones, because of course I have no means to freeze what I cant eat. In order to do this I usually fish from the canoe in shallow water however, I had good luck doing this just casting from shore on the last trip..



 

oldsailor

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Mar 28, 2008
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509
Location
Moses Lake, WA
When we were in the Sea of Cortez on our sailboat in the 1980s I decided to catch breakfast early one morning and headed out of San Carlos in the dinghy. I hadn't gone 200 feet when I caught a 5lb fish. But I wasn't done wanting to go fishing so I put my gear in the water again. Another 200 feet and another 5lb Sierra Mackeral. By the time I got back to Kibitka I had 100lbs of fish in the dinghy... all nice Sierra Mackeral (which tasted like rainbow trout when pan-fired in butter).

Like Monster, no way to freeze fish on a 32-foot sailboat so I rowed around from boat to boat in the anchorage and gave all but one of the fish away. There was a lot of good eating going on that morning. :)

Craig
 
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